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New DOE Guidance On GSL & GSIL Backstop Timing and Certification Requirements

On October 28th, the US DOE issued new guidance for the industry to comply with the GSL & GSIL certification requirements and timing. Back in May, the DOE issued two final rules for these lamps. These rules changed which lamps have to be certified to DOE.

On October 28th, the US DOE issued new guidance for the industry to comply with the GSL & GSIL certification requirements and timing. In May of 2022, the DOE issued two final rules for these lamps:

Image: https://appliance-standards.org

  1. Expanded definition of GSL & GSIL that became effective on 7/8/22 (“the Definitions Rule”), and
  2. The prohibition of selling any GSL below 45 lm/W, effective 7/25/22 (“the Backstop Rule”).

These rules changed which lamps have to be certified to DOE CCMS. Although GSLs must comply with the Backstop Rule, manufacturers are not currently required to certify compliance to the efficacy backstop. This may become required at a future date. DOE is only requiring certification to the applicable pre-backstop standard. See the table below.

DOE will pursue penalties for GSLs that do not meet the 45 lm/W requirement, whether they are certified to a pre-backstop standard or not.

Manufacturers of GSLs must also apply the sampling and test methods of 10 CFR 429.57 for determining represented values and ratings for GSLs, including those subject to the FTC lighting labeling rules, even if they are not currently required to certify compliance to DOE.

There are seven categories of lamps that were not GSILs before the Definitions Rule, but now are GSILs and thus also are GSLs. These are: (1) T shape lamps that use not more than 40 watts or has a length of more than 10 inches; (2) B, BA, CA, F, G16-1/2, G-25, G30, S, or M-14 lamps of 40 watts or less; (3) reflector lamps; (4) rough service lamps; (5) shatter-resistant lamps; (6) 3-way lamps; and (7) vibration service lamps. Each manufacturer/importer must certify that each model of these GSILs complies with the applicable maximum wattage standards. The 45 lm/W backstop sales ban applies to these lamps, as they are now GSLs.

DOE began enforcing the certification requirements for these 7 additional lamp categories on November 1, 2022. Each manufacturer/importer must certify all basic models distributed in commerce in the United States no later than November 1. A manufacturer who begins distributing in commerce any of these additional lamps that were manufactured or imported on or after November 1, 2022, must certify that basic model before distribution. Manufacturers who continue to hold inventory that was manufactured before November 1, 2022 do not need to certify compliance for these basic models. The certification provisions require new basic models of GSILs manufactured or imported on or after November 1, 2022 subject to the energy conservation standards to be certified before distribution in commerce, annually thereafter, and when discontinued.

Rough service and vibration service lamps were subject to a wattage limit before the Definitions Rule, and IRLs were subject to standards. Now each manufacturer/importer of rough and vibration service lamps and IRLs must certify compliance according to the requirements for GSILs.

Existing certification requirements continue to apply to medium base compact fluorescent lamps, candelabra and intermediate base incandescent lamps and lamps defined as GSILs before the Definitions Rule. This requires certifying compliance with the applicable standards, using the applicable sampling plan and certification requirements.

The DOE guidance document can be downloaded here.

Source: US DOE 10/31/22 Certification Guidance for GSIL & GSL

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Novel Approaches To Fitness Center Lighting

David recently reviewed two separate case studies about Fitness Center lighting and was struck by how different the two approaches were.

I recently read two separate case studies about Fitness Center lighting and was struck by how different the two approaches were:

Image: Axis Lighting

Evolve Strength in Canada

This gym’s focus was acoustic lighting to solve acoustic challenges. Fitness centers present architects and designers with unique problems: large and open areas with few walls, tall ceilings, and often exposed ductwork—none of which is conducive to sound absorption. If noise is ignored, it can be unpleasant, which could contribute to members not coming back. Hypertension, impaired cognition, and general lack of concentration are all results of a poor acoustic environment.

Lighting is generally out of the direct visual field in fitness centers. However, it is perfectly positioned to help control acoustics. By looking for solutions that combine lighting with acoustic panels, architects and designers now have unparalleled design flexibility. Easily installed, acoustic lighting absorbs vibrations and sound, greatly reduces ambient noise, and creates a more pleasant experience, particularly in fitness centers with high ceilings and hard materials from which sounds reverberate.

Lighting can be used for wayfinding, to provide direction, and symbolize stopping points, such as at a reception area. Light fixtures can catch the eye and draw visitors. For example, by hanging geometric lighting above a reception area, visitors are informed that this is a place to which they should be attracted.

Evolve Strength installed a 41’ x 46’ system over the reception and welcome area and the café and lounge space. The acoustic lighting system serves as wayfinding, directing guests into the facility. A hexagon shape was chosen to complement the wellness and health center.

Everlast Gyms in the United Kingdom

Everlast Gyms in the UK is using a centralized system to control lighting in all 69 locations. The design uses soft, functional lights for a minimalist design. Suspended linear luminaires create geometric shapes such as chevrons, lines, and squares that help distinguish different areas, which Everlast refers to as “innovative zones.”

The gym chain is controlling each location from a central dashboard using Signify’s Interact networked control system. The cloud-based platform collects data from all light points via a connected lighting infrastructure and is displayed on a centralized dashboard. This enables comparison, monitoring, and management of lighting across multiple locations to improve efficiency.

The Evolve Strength case study is available here.

The Everlast Gyms case study is available here.

Image: Axis Lighting

 

Image: Signify

 

Image: Signify

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US Government Launching Labeling Program For Cybersecurity Of IoT Devices

The Biden administration said it will launch a cybersecurity labeling program for consumer Internet of Things (IoT) devices starting in 2023 in an effort to protect Americans from “significant national security risks.”

The Biden administration said it will launch a cybersecurity labeling program for consumer Internet of Things (IoT) devices starting in 2023 in an effort to protect Americans from “significant national security risks.”

Image: Bryce Durbin / TechCrunch

Inspired by ENERGY STAR, a labeling program operated by US EPA to promote energy efficiency, the White House is planning to roll out a similar IoT labeling program to the “highest-risk” devices starting next year, a senior Biden administration official said following a recent National Security Council meeting with consumer product associations and device manufacturers.

The initiative, described by White House officials as “ENERGY STAR for cyber,” will help Americans to recognize whether devices meet a set of basic cybersecurity standards devised by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

Though specifics of the program have not yet been confirmed, the administration said it will “keep things simple.” The labels, which will be “globally recognized” and debut on devices such as routers and home cameras, will take the form of a “barcode” that users can scan using their smartphone rather than a static paper label, the administration official said. The scanned barcode will link to information based on standards, such as software updating policies, data encryption and vulnerability remediation.

The announcement comes after the White House last year ordered NIST and the FTC to explore two labeling pilot programs on cybersecurity capabilities for IoT devices. It also comes after the U.K. government last year introduced an IoT security bill in Parliament, requiring device manufacturers, importers, and distributors to meet certain cybersecurity standards.

Read the full story in TechCrunch here.

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Product Monday: Signify Halts Sales Of Philips Hue Lightguide Lamps After 3 Weeks

Only three weeks after launching it’s new Philips Hue Lightguide smart lamps, Signify halted sales and completely removed the new lamps from its website.

Only three weeks after launching its new Philips Hue Lightguide smart lamps, Signify halted sales and completely removed the new lamps from its website.

Image: Signify

Released in three shapes — large globe, ellipse, and triangular — the Lightguide smart lamps featured interior, optical-grade polycarbonate tubes that “diffuse” light in practically any color. A reflective coating amplifies the effect. Lightguide lamps were intended to complement the decor of modern homes and blend seamlessly with other Philips Hue products. Philips also offered their own pendant cord and metal holder (sold separately), to showcase the new lamps.

However, due to an “aesthetic defect,” the Hue Lightguide lamps have been indefinitely delayed, according to the company. In a statement to TechHive, Signify confirmed:

Philips Hue has always been committed to delivering the best experience with our high-quality products. Because of that commitment, the launch of the new Philips Hue Lightguide bulbs and their matching pendant cords has been postponed until further notice. In recent tests, an aesthetic inconsistency was detected that is not in line with the experience we envisioned. We’re undertaking additional testing to ensure that Lightguide bulbs are in line with our high-quality standards. Keep an eye on www.philips-hue.com for new information.”

One customer on Hueblog.com wrote that the inside of the triangular Lightguide he received was cloudy. The full TechHive story is available here.

Image: Signify

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2022 State of the Cannabis Lighting Market Finds Record LED Usage

Cannabis Business Times released the seventh-annual “State of the Cannabis Lighting Market” report. Results from the 2022 report demonstrate the increasing usage of LED lighting technology across all growth stages of cannabis cultivation. For the first time ever, at least 70% of study participants from commercial indoor or greenhouse operations with supplemental lighting used LEDs in cannabis propagation, vegetation and/or flowering stages.

Cannabis Business Times released the seventh-annual “State of the Cannabis Lighting Market” report. Results from the 2022 report demonstrate the increasing usage of LED lighting technology across all growth stages of cannabis cultivation. For the first time ever, at least 70% of study participants from commercial indoor or greenhouse operations with supplemental lighting used LEDs in cannabis propagation, vegetation and/or flowering stages. The report also demonstrates an increase in LED usage by more than 50 percentage points since the study’s first year in 2016.

Image courtesy of Pixabay.com

The report details the connection between lighting solutions and plant growth across all stages—propagation, vegetation and flowering. Key findings from the report include:

• 83% of participants list energy efficiency as the top benefit of using LED lighting. 

• 46% of participants considering implementing or retrofitting with LEDs cite lower power usage as the top purchasing driver.

• 53% of participants named “light intensity” the top factor driving their light purchasing decisions for flowering—up 13 percentage points from last year.

• 47% of growers cite the importance of fixture-dimming capabilities and allowing for greater lighting flexibility, up from 36% in 2021.

• Among study participants representing non-LED-powered operations, 30% plan to add LEDs for flowering within the next 12 months.

• 51% of growers are interested in exploring side, inter-canopy, subcanopy or other lighting in addition to top lighting. 

There are 19 states that have legalized adult-use cannabis, and the majority of states have legalizedmedical cannabis. The 2022 “State of the Cannabis Lighting Market” study was conducted by ReadexResearch. Participants included North American cannabis cultivators. View the full report in Cannabis Business Times’ October issue.

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Sustainability And Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

A recent editorial in LD&A magazine noted that we no longer have to single out “LED” lighting projects because now almost all projects use LEDs. There is no question that LEDs have drastically reduced energy use in both new construction and retrofit projects. So much so that some are arguing if we even really need lighting energy codes anymore.

By Jeff Schwartz, LC, Member Emeritus IES  – JDS1 Consulting

A recent editorial in LD&A magazine noted that we no longer have to single out “LED” lighting projects because now almost all projects use LEDs. There is no question that LEDs have drastically reduced energy use in both new construction and retrofit projects. So much so that some are arguing if we even really need lighting energy codes anymore.

But if we take a look backward, there are lessons to be learned. When fluorescent tubes, screw-in compact fluorescents, and “PL” type lamps came out, we hailed them as wonderful energy-saving technologies. Then we found out that the mercury they contained was ending up in our landfills. It took years, and the investment of significant capitol, before we started recycling fluorescent lighting. In fact, laws were passed, and codes established to make sure fluorescent recycling got done. We got really good at it, recycling almost all the materials.

With the introduction of LEDs, we jumped right into selling and using them without a well thought out plan to deal with end-of-life. When I first started selling LED exit signs in the 1980s, I joked with my customers that these would last so long “we will both be retired before they burn out.” Well, I was right about burning out, but recent studies have shown that older LED exit signs no longer meet the standards for visibility due to depreciated lumen output. If we are to correct this problem, it means that millions (yes millions) of older exit signs should be replaced sometime soon. And our plan for recycling is?? While there are some companies offering to recycle LEDs, I have yet to find any information on how much of the material is actually recycled.

Metals and metalloids such as arsenic, gallium, indium, and the rare-earth elements (REEs) cerium, europium, gadolinium, lanthanum, terbium, and yttrium are important mineral materials used in LED semiconductor technology. Each of these is used in miniscule quantities. Are they actually being recycled, or is it just the plastic and metal? If these end up en masse in our landfills, what impact will they have on our water tables if they leak? What are the potential health risks? Once again, what are we doing to our environment?

Vermont and California have both recently moved to ban most fluorescent tubes and CFLs, in order to push forward with LED replacements. As noted, we have the ability to recycle all those fluorescent tubes, but what do we do ten or more years from now when the LED tubes reach end-of-life? We know how to recycle the glass, but what about the rest of it?

The National Association of Innovative Lighting Distributors (NAILD) recently put out an open letter in which they challenged our industry to think of sustainability in terms of components (like replaceable tubes) instead of whole fixtures that will be thrown away. While that certainly addresses part of the problem, it still leaves us with a technology that is difficult to recycle.

In summary, sustainability has to be cradle to grave, and I fear that just like with fluorescent lighting, we have not thought through all of the long-term implications for LEDs.

Jeff can be reached at – JDS1Consulting@gmail.com

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Shedding Light On Data Centers

At ArchLIGHT Summit in September, David met staff from Lantana. The company specializes in lighting for data centers, specifically linear architectural luminaires with remote drivers and PoE options. They’ve illuminated over 30 million square feet of data centers, nationally.

At ArchLIGHT Summit in September, I met staff from a lighting manufacturer named Lantana. One of Lantana’s specialties is lighting for data centers, specifically linear architectural luminaires with remote drivers and PoE options. The company cites that they’ve installed over 70,000 luminaires, 6,500 low voltage systems, and illuminated over 30 million square feet of data centers, nationally. Lantana published a fact sheet on their lighting solutions for data centers that details some interesting aspects of data center lighting:

Lantana data center lighting fact sheet

  • During the pandemic, e-commerce grew dramatically, creating a significant surge in data center construction that continues today.
  • Rising demand for high-performance computing (HPC) is causing an increase in data rack density. Servers, storage racks, and networking devices require increasing amounts of energy as computer density increases. Energy per rack has recently increased by 300 to 500%. One hyperscale data center can require the energy of 80,000 US households. Electricity for data centers includes server energy as well as significant cooling energy.
  • Many data centers have hot aisle heat conditions that can jeopardize conventional fixtures.
  • Data centers typically have no windows and flat black equipment cabinets, eliminating daylight and much of the reflected light. Poorly placed lighting can cast shadows, impairing the servicing of equipment.
  • Lighting maintenance above server racks risks costly damage to sensitive equipment. Remote drivers outside the server rooms provide easy access that protects servers. It can also avoid electrical shutdowns that could impact servers.
  • Remoting drivers can move most of the heat generated by luminaires to outside the server rooms.
  • There are different applications within data centers. The lighting requirements for a colocation (data center in a 3rd-party leased facility) differ from an enterprise hyperscale (significantly larger data centers, typically for large, high tech companies).

Download the Lantana Data Center Fact Sheet, here.

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AI Is Changing Design Fields. Is Lighting Next?

A recent New York Times article reviewed how AI is impacting creative fields, such as interior design, graphic design, filmmaking, video game development, and more.

A recent New York Times article reviewed how AI is impacting creative fields, such as interior design, graphic design, filmmaking, video game development, and more.

The article examines new AI-design tools, such as:

Image by Suelynn Shiller using DreamStudio, AI image generator. 

  • InteriorAI – AI interior design generator
  • Midjourney – AI image generator
  • DreamStudio – AI image generator
  • Stable Diffusion – AI image generator
  • DALL-E 2 – AI image generator

The InteriorAI interior design tool raises some interesting questions for the lighting industry. Interior designers can be lighting specifiers, along with lighting designers, architects, and engineers. If an AI interior design generator selects the lighting for a room or building, there are implications for manufacturers, agents, and distributors supplying the specification channel:

  • Does the AI only suggest aesthetic directions, or does it suggest actual product models?
  • If it suggests product models, how will the spec channel sell to these specifiers? Will they now have to sell their product lines to the AI interior design software developers, in this example?

With some online research, I found these additional AI interior design generators: Foyr Neo, Autodesk Maya, Autodesk 3Ds Max, Homestyler, and Planner 5D.

What about the lighting design industry? Are there AI lighting design generators? It looks like they’re coming. MaestroDMX is on Kickstarter. It’s an autonomous AI lighting designer-in-a-box that listens to music and makes AV decisions like a professional entertainment lighting designer.

And what about luminaire design? Are there AI industrial design generators? There aren’t specifically for lighting, but some product designers are using AI image generators, like DreamStudio, to generate creative product concepts that could easily be applied to lighting products. With no design experience (nor skill), I generated the cobalt crystal and polished aluminum chandelier, pictured below, using DreamStudio. It took me about 10 minutes of playing with the prompts (similar to keywords in a search engine).

After reading half-a-dozen articles on AI-generated design and playing with the software, my takeaway is that  AI design programs are useful for providing creative design ideas, concepts, and images. They’re not ready to put designers out of work………yet.

Before and after images courtesy of InteriorAI, AI interior design generator

 

AI-generated chandelier by David Shiller.

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The Traditional Office Is Rapidly Being Replaced By Co-Working Spaces

A previous LightNOW post discussed the shift of offices from downtowns to suburbs, a significant reduction in downtown office occupancy, and the conversion of office buildings to residential use. There is another significant trend in office spaces. 39% of prospective office tenants report they either already use co-working spaces or are considering using co-working space solutions for their employees.

A previous LightNOW post discussed the shift of offices from downtowns to suburbs, a significant reduction in downtown office occupancy, and the conversion of office buildings to residential use. There is another significant trend in office spaces. 39% of prospective office tenants report they either already use co-working spaces or are considering using co-working space solutions for their employees.

Image courtesy Pixabay.com

Yardi Kube, a co-working management software company, released a survey of more than 1,100 prospective office tenants. Cost savings is the main reason for leasing flexible workspaces. 47% of respondents indicated they would require no in-office attendance or at most 2 days per week for their teams.

Office tenants have rapidly shifted towards remote and hybrid work arrangements after the onset of the pandemic, sending vacancy rates to all-time high levels across the U.S. Remote work, or work from home, has dominated the workspace landscape for the past two years, but many organizations are now making a move towards bringing employees back to the office, an adjustment that must take into account changing workforce expectations. Those working remotely have enjoyed no commute times, a flexible work schedule, extended family time and a more comfortable environment, among other work-from-home benefits.

Flexible workspace solutions have been getting a lot of attention as corporate America adapts to employee requests for hybrid work. Organizations across the country are reconsidering their office space needs while trying to provide their employees with a traditional workspace that fosters collaboration and empowers productivity.

The percentage of companies planning to return to the office full-time and those planning to work fully remote is almost the same, 34% and 35%, respectively. This means that the return plans for companies differ, and each company’s needs are important when considering the ideal office solution and work dynamic. Another 12% of companies are leaning towards some of the time (1-2 days) and 19% towards most of the time (3-4 days) in office.

How do you think the growth in co-working space will impact lighting products specified? Will it have other impacts on the office lighting market? Please share your thoughts below in the comment section.

The full article about the Yardi Kube survey can be found here.

 

 

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Quick Summary Of CA Title 24 Lighting Changes For Non-Residential Buildings

Energy Code Ace has created a summary of California Title 24 code changes for Non-Residential Buildings. The 2022 Title 24, Part 6 Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Energy Code or Title 24, Part 6) updates the 2019 Energy Code.

Energy Code Ace has created a summary of California Title 24 code changes for Non-Residential Buildings. The 2022 Title 24, Part 6 Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Energy Code or Title 24, Part 6) updates the 2019 Energy Code.

The 2022 Energy Code is effective as of January 1, 2023. Any projects that apply for a permit on or after this date will be subject to the 2022 Energy Code. Information and documents are available at: https://www.energy.ca.gov/programs-and- topics/programs/building-energy-efficiency-standards/2022- building-energy-efficiency .

Below are the key lighting changes to the Energy Code that apply to nonresidential buildings such as hotels, motels, factories, office buildings, retail spaces and healthcare facilities. In the 2019 Energy Code, high-rise multifamily buildings were grouped with nonresidential buildings. The 2022 Energy Code reorganizes low-rise and high-rise multifamily buildings into one building type and moves requirements for multifamily buildings to their own subchapters.

INDOOR LIGHTING:

Lighting Controls

  • 130.1

Mandatory Requirements

Demand-responsive Lighting Controls: There is a new trigger in §110.12(c) based on lighting wattage, not square footage. When general and all other lighting is subject to the multilevel requirements of §130.1(b) for a project 4,000 watts or more, demand-responsive controls are required. A demand-response signal must be capable of automatically reducing general lighting as specified in Table 130.1-A requirements. All other lighting can also be included but is not required.

Manual Area Controls: There are new exceptions to the manual area control accessibility and location requirements.

Shut-OFF Controls: Offices over 250 ft2 have new shut-OFF control requirements.

Daylighting Controls: Secondary daylighting controls are now mandatory along with primary and skylit daylighting controls.

Power Adjustment Factors and Lighting Power Allowances
§140.6(a)

Prescriptive Requirements

Since offices over 250 ft2 now have Mandatory occupancy sensor control requirements, the large office power adjustment factors (PAFs) have been revised on Table 140.6-C.

The allowed indoor lighting power density has been reduced for many types of buildings and spaces:

  • Table 140.6-B: Complete Building Method
  • Table 140.6-C: Area Category Method
  • Tables 140.6-D, E, F, and G Tailored Methods

Indoor Lighting Alterations

  • 141.0(b)2I

Prescriptive Requirements

Changes are made to Table 141.0-F Control Requirments for Indoor Lighting Systems Alterations. Alterations do not need to meet new occupancy sensor requirements for offices 250 ft2 or larger that either:

  • Use 80% or less of allowed wattage allowance of §140.6
  • Reduce wattage one-for-one over 40%

OUTDOOR LIGHTING:

Outdoor Lighting Zones

Title 24, Part 1 §10-114

Mandatory Requirements

The 2022 Energy Code changes how lighting zones LZ1, LZ2, and LZ3 apply. In Table 8, excerpted from Table 10-114-A, there are two urban zones, and new examples are given. See the excerpt below.

Outdoor Lighting Power Allowances

  • 140.7

Prescriptive Requirements

Table 140.7-A General Hardscape Lighting Power Allowance has revised wattage allowances. Asphalt and concrete are no longer differentiated on the table.

An additional allowance for security cameras is added to Table 140.7-B Additional Lighting Power Allowance for Specific Applications. This allowance applies when a security camera is installed within 2 mounting heights of the general hardscape area and mounted over 10 ft away from a building.

The full Energy Code Ace Fact Sheet on What’s New in 2022 for Non-Residential Buildings can be found here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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