Author: David Shiller

Interview: Korrus’s CEO On The Recent Acquisition Of Circadian ZircLight

Korrus is the company that owns Ecosense, Soraa, Scuva, Tempo Industries, and now Circadian ZircLight. They focus on “Human Light Interaction (HLI),” which they define as seeking to understand human interactions with light, and creating technologies that better serve the needs of those humans.

Korrus is the company that owns Ecosense, Soraa, Scuva, Tempo Industries, and now Circadian ZircLight. They focus on “Human Light Interaction (HLI),” which they define as seeking to understand human interactions with light, and creating technologies that better serve the needs of those humans. I interviewed Mark Reynosa, CEO of Korrus, about their recent acquisition of Circadian ZircLight, and where Korrus is going from here.

Shiller: Congratulations, first off, on the acquisition of Circadian ZircLight.

Reynosa: Thank you so much.

Shiller: I was curious whether the acquisition would impact the partnerships that Circadian ZircLight currently has, providing light engines to partners like Acuity, H.E. Williams, and presumably others? Will the OEM engine play still be a focus for Circadian ZircLight?

Reynosa: Yes. We have no intention to interrupt any preexisting agreements and relationships between ZircLight and other participants in the industry. Quite the opposite. The entire thesis around our acquisition has been it supports our mission and the thesis is about enabling and creating greater awareness around solutions that deal with some of the ill effects of artificial light in the world, today.

Shiller: You mentioned the ill effects of artificial light. Most of the circadian lighting manufacturers leading the space have focused on what I consider a high cyan / low cyan, 2-channel approach. That’s been the dominant approach by multiple players. I’m curious if you envision circadian lighting moving beyond this 2-channel approach, to more sophisticated levels of spectral tuning?

Reynosa: We’ve been working really hard for quite a long time to really understand, at the physiological level, what actually works well in terms of understanding spectral energy. The kind of light that naturally occurs from morning till evening, and then asking ourselves, to what degree can we accurately replicate that spectral energy, to effectively entrain one’s circadian system. Through a tremendous amount of work, and years of research, we believe we have a technology platform that actually delivers on that promise. And you’ll begin to see our dynamic offering in that regard, begin to enter the marketplace next year. We believe it is materially differentiated from anything you’ve seen in the world, heretofore.

Shiller: So you’re saying that there are different approaches coming, beyond this 2-channel, high cyan / low cyan approach? Do you agree that something more sophisticated is coming, without asking you to give it away?

Reynosa: Yes. It’s been a very clear focus of ours. All through the organic work that we’ve done, and then through the acquisition of Soraa, and now with ZircLight, we have almost 500 patents in the intersections of humans and light, many of which have to do with one’s physiology, biology, and how it interacts with one’s circadian system and the natural environment. We don’t believe there is anything in the marketplace today that accurately reflects what occurs in nature. We think what we are building towards is quite likely a step function change from what is available today.

Shiller: Sounds exciting. You mentioned the Soraa asset acquisition in 2020. There was also the Lumium acquisition in 2019, the Tempo Industries acquisition earlier this year, and now Circadian ZircLight. Do you foresee Korrus acquisitions continuing at this pace?

Reynosa: We don’t really have a time-based acquisition strategy. Our business model and strategy have been pretty clear for the better part of almost a decade now. Sometimes there are opportunities that allow us to scale our vision more quickly. And in those instances, if we see that opportunity, we will take advantage of that through an acquisition. Otherwise, like Scuva, we’ll just build it internally. In fact, you’ll see an announcement coming shortly from us whereby we are partnering in the marketplace with an entity to help us increase the speed with which certain life-based technologies can be delivered to the marketplace, to increase human health and well-being, literally. You’ll see that announced in a number of days or weeks.

We build it internally, we acquire something externally, or we partner with someone. We’re very agnostic about the pathway through which we execute. The key for us is that we see it as a tremendous opportunity to get critical technology out to hundreds of millions, if not billions of people. We just focus on the ways in which we think we can do that best.

Shiller: The Lumium Lighting brand was turned into a product line under Ecosense, but Soraa and Tempo remained separate brands. Will Circadian ZircLight remain a separate brand or be consolidated like Lumium?

Reynosa: The distinctions between how we operate a particular brand varies depending on where we think the best way to maximize against our vision is. We haven’t completely determined the right way to optimize the ZircLight platform, because it is a just announced acquisition. Part of what we do is go out to the existing marketplace partners and ask them how do they feel we can best support them in their efforts with our technologies and solutions. We take that input into account in how we think about an execution perspective.

Shiller: With this Circadian ZircLight acquisition, Korrus is very well positioned and represented in the circadian and GUV aspects of light & health. I’m curious if you envision Korrus moving into other areas of active research for light & health, such as migraines, depression and other non-circadian light therapies?

Reynosa: Yes, this may be is a good point to clarify the mission that we are on. The way that we describe ourselves is that we’re pioneering a new industry called Human Light Interaction. As the name implies, what we want to understand deeply is all of the ways in which humans and light behave together, and how we might be able to provide or create technologies that enhance those interactions. That could be in the in the realm of diseases and illnesses. It could have to do with antiviral properties and material properties. Germicidal things that have to do with the lived environment and to optimize that from a physiological perspective. So we see our mandate as extremely wide, and we don’t even use the word “lighting” to describe the business. We use the word “light.” If you just pause for a second and just think about that, the distinction is quite different. In fact, we had part of our business development team at Display Week, this week in San Jose, showing our technology and our display applications. So televisions, monitors, smartphones, tablets, laptops, etc. When we think about the problems being encountered in modern society and the application layers of modern society, we see our mandate and vision really speaking to that entire opportunity set. The next logical question is that’s a gigantic market and opportunity set. So we try to be very disciplined in the specific areas that we want to target. But in terms of research abilities, we have a deep science and engineering team, exploring a very wide cross-section of modern dynamics and how we might participate in helping better the world through specific applications.

We have a culture of curiosity and exploration. If one of our scientists or engineers come upon something in the literature that they think is interesting, we give them the opportunity to go explore and understand that more deeply. It could be depression, Alzheimer’s, sleep, or performance, like an athlete. It is extremely wide.

Shiller: I personally see those non-circadian light therapies, for things like migraines, depression, etc. as potentially becoming much bigger business than circadian lighting, over the medium term, because it’s so debilitating, and it’s a bigger quality of life issue. Do you see those areas becoming big business or is it just too soon to tell?

Reynosa: Take a step even further out. I think the intersection of digital technologies, health, and wellness, which has even removed the word light, for a second. I think in the next 30 to 50 years, you’re going to see an ocean of new categories, industries, products, applications, and experiences at that intersection. At one level, Korrus is just a small microcosm of a gigantic wave coming from that direction, at that intersection. To your point, it is an overwhelmingly large opportunities, because since the Industrial Revolution, we’ve pretty materially divorced ourselves from the natural environment. Modernity brought in a lot of really wonderful things, but with that we brought on certain drawbacks and certain compromises that we think we can create a better balance with. We see our mission as elevating people’s understanding of their light diet, much in the same way they think about food, air and water. It’s literally that fundamental. And in the last 50 years, you’ve seen real revolutions, frankly, in all three of those,  where we believe light to be extremely misunderstood. And part of that is because 80% of everything that we know about human health and light has only been discovered in the last 20 years. The science is only now catching up with the truth and reality of the situation We’re trying to be at the forefront of that to help bring awareness and evangelize ways in which we can solve some of those modern ill effects, from divorcing ourselves from nature.

Shiller: We have been talking about human light interaction. Do you anticipate Korrus moving beyond human light interaction to other biological lighting, such as horticultural lighting or livestock and poultry lighting, that are non-human, but still biological.

Reynosa That’s a good question. Probably every three to six months, we get an inbound request, whether it’s from somebody in industry or academia, who is interested in exploring some of those intersections with our technology capabilities. After some explorations in that space, we’ve concluded that the intersections of humans and light is already overwhelmingly large. Opening the aperture up even larger, right now, would be a real distraction.

Shiller: Is there anything else that you’d like our reader to know about Korrus?

Reynosa: Thank you for that. I’d encourage people to go to Korrus.com to learn a little bit more about the market and the industry that we’re pioneering. There are a couple of videos. One that discusses human interaction with light and our mission. There’s a second video, under our science page, specifically on the intersection of humans and circadian health and well-being.

Shiller: Thank you for sharing your insights, Mark.

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Product Monday: New Category Of LED Filament Lamps For HID Replacement

A new category of HID replacement lamps has arrived that are definitely not “corn cobs.” Their high lumen output LED filament lamps in traditional HID lamp form factors. I’ve found wattages as high as 42W (LED) that claim to replace up to 175W Metal Halide or HPS system watts (HID lamp + ballast), providing up to 75% energy savings.

A new category of HID replacement lamps has arrived that are definitely not “corn cobs.” Their high lumen output LED filament lamps in traditional HID lamp form factors. I’ve found wattages as high as 42W (LED) that claim to replace up to 175W Metal Halide or HPS system watts (HID lamp + ballast), providing up to 75% energy savings. All of the models that I’ve found are ballast-bypass, 120-277VAC input voltage, Type B. Some lamps are E26 and some are E39/EX39. Here are three early entrants into this new category:

LEDVANCE – Under its Sylvania brand, its ULTRA LED High Lumen Filament Lamps (image above) come in two 26W, ED28 shape models, one clear and one frosted, with a 300o light distribution/beam angle. They’re 153 lpW, phase-cut dimmable, 5000K (only), 4000 lumens, 5-year warranty (NLB Certified Warranty), 25,000 hours L70. More information here.

 

SATCO – Called Hi-Pro LED Filament Lamps, Satco’s are frosted only, claiming a full 360o beam angle and wet location listed (image directly below). Wattages up to 42W, producing 6000 lumens (143 lpW). More information here.

TCP – Their High Lumen LED Filament Lamps claim 200 lpW and 50,000 hour L70 (image directly below). TCP offers a 2200K CCT to resemble high pressure sodium lamps. Their 30W models in 4000K and 5000K are listed at 6000 lumens. They’re clear glass only, no frosted, in ED17, ED23, and ED28 shapes/sizes. More information here.

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Recent ANSI Standards Address Sky Glow, UV-LED Performance, Expanded Digital Lighting Control, and Tunable-White SSL

A variety of new and updated ANSI standards address topics as diverse as sky glow, UV-LED Performance, expanded digital lighting control, and tunable-white SSL products. Below are quick summaries of each one, with links to more information.

A variety of new and updated ANSI standards address topics as diverse as sky glow, UV-LED Performance, expanded digital lighting control, and tunable-white SSL products. Below are quick summaries of each one, with links to more information.

Sky Glow, ANSI/IES TM-37-21:

This document provides guidance on the means of reducing human contributions to light in the night sky and information on estimating the relative effectiveness of the different options available. It describes the causes, characteristics, and potential impacts of human-based sky glow, and provides the current state of the science for conducting estimations to facilitate its quantification and control. Virtually all lighting applications with exposure to the exterior environment fall within this purview, including street and area lighting, sports lighting, signage, and advertisement lighting, industrial lighting, light escaping the interior of commercial and residential buildings via windows, and landscape lighting. The beginning steps of a proactive response from the lighting community toward addressing the panoply of concerns are presented in the most well-rounded and practical manner possible. Improved understanding and estimation of the associated sources, quantities, characteristics, and resulting behaviors of light entering the night sky are essential components of a comprehensive remediation strategy. More information here.

UV-LED Performance, ANSI/IES/IUVA LM-92-22:

The Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) and International Ultraviolet Association (IUVA) recently published the first standard on the measurement of UV product emissions in a series of planned American National Standards. ANSI/IES/IUVA LM-92-22 Approved Method: Optical and Electrical Measurement of Ultraviolet LEDs details a method for repeatable laboratory testing and measurement of UV-LED optical and electrical performance characteristics. LM-92 covers measurement of UV LEDs in the wavelength range of 200 nm to 400 nm under continuous-pulse operation. LEDs with wavelengths longer than 360 nm are covered in ANSI/IES LM-85-20. More information at LEDs Magazine here.

Expanded Digital Lighting Control, ANSI C137.4-2021:

Harmonization of international standards related to DALI lighting control continues with the publication of the updated ANSI C137.4-2021 standard in North America. ANSI C137.4-2021 builds on the international standard IEC 62386 (which underpins the DALI communication protocol) and has additional characteristics and features that align very closely with the D4i family of specifications from the DALI Alliance, a global lighting-industry organization.

D4i and ANSI C137.4-2021 specify the digital communication interface between luminaires and devices including sensors and network lighting controllers (NLCs). As well as including power-supply requirements, the standards define data models based on memory banks that enable the exchange of data. Implementation of these standards enables smart, connected luminaires, as well as interoperability between LED drivers and luminaire-mounted control devices. More information at inside.lighting here.

Tunable White SSL, ANSI/IES TM-38-21:

The ability to emit radiant power in hundreds or thousands of spectral combinations—only limited by the precision of the control signal being provided—poses a distinct challenge for measuring product performance. TM-38-21 establishes a common protocol for measuring photometric, colorimetric, and electrical characteristics of tunable-white solid-state lighting products—including lamps, luminaires, and light engines. It defines the minimum number and order in which measurements are to be made, and it provides a framework for data reporting. This TM also describes a method for interpolating between measured data, including for CCT range, Duv range, lumen output range (at full intensity control as color changes), efficacy at maximum output, efficacy range, color rendition, and chromaticity coordinates.

The protocol described herein applies to products for which the spectral power distribution can be adjusted with a single, one-dimensional input having a quantitative, interval format, either continuous or discrete, that is nominally independent of luminous flux control. The method described does not apply to products that intentionally change chromaticity with luminous flux (e.g., dim-to-warm), nor products with multiple color-control input signals (e.g., full-color-tunable) that cannot be set to operate with a single color-control input signal. More information here.

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“Build-Your-Own Acorn” Gives Lots Of Options For Decorative Post Top Retrofits

Evluma offers a Build-Your-Own Acorn, a full-fixture, decorative streetlight replacement solution that includes the customer’s choice of acorn globe, finial, and capital fitter.

Evluma offers a Build-Your-Own Acorn, a full-fixture, decorative streetlight replacement solution that includes the customer’s choice of acorn globe, finial, and capital fitter. Utilizing the OmniMax LED replacement for HID lamps, this creates an affordable approach to decorative post-top head replacements. The solution is designed for utilities, municipalities, facilities, and property managers looking to upgrade existing decorative lighting from HID to LED.

The system begins with a mogul base OmniMax screw-based lamp, in 40, 70, or 100W. It’s offered in six different correlated color temperatures (CCT) to achieve the desired look and Spectral Power Distribution (SPD). OmniMax offers three CCT under 3000K: 2000K, 2200K, and 2700K. There is an OmniMax Premium, which includes Photocontrol Failsafe and operates with the ConnectLED wireless control Bluetooth app, or there is the OmiMax Standard. All OmniMax are 120-277VAC.

As a second step, the customer selects the desired capital fitter or base. It can be ordered with or without a photocontrol depending on the electrical configuration of your lights. The fitter is offered in black or green and fits all of the 8” globes offered in Evluma’s OLS collection.

The third step is selecting an optic with prismatic Type V or Type III light distribution, low-glare, diffuse acrylics, or sparkling polycarbonate. The fourth and final step is selecting from two ornate, architecturally styled fixtures. One comes with decorative arms and both come with cap and finial. Depending on the globe selected, uplight blockers and final options are available. There is also a set of snap-on shields for the OmniMax designed to reduce uplight and soften the house-side throw.

More information is available here.

 

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NEMA Published Recommendations For Replacing HID Lamps With LED Lamps

In February, 2022, NEMA published NEMA LL-10, Replacing HID Lamps with LED Lamps: Light Output Equivalency Claims. This document describes a method for claiming equivalency of LED lamps to the HID lamps they replace.

In February, 2022, NEMA published NEMA LL-10, Replacing HID Lamps with LED Lamps: Light Output Equivalency Claims. This document describes a method for claiming equivalency of LED lamps to the HID lamps they replace. The NEMA standard applies to omnidirectional lamps. (The equivalency for directional lamps is more complicated and requires simulation or mockups to establish). The intention is for manufacturers to use LL-10 when they prepare their equivalency claims.

Replacing high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps with light-emitting diode (LED) equivalents should be an easy and straightforward endeavor. However, currently, there are significant variations in the luminous flux (light output) of LED lamps claiming to be equivalent to a particular HID lamp wattage. When this happens, customer confusion and dissatisfaction can ensue and result in an unlevel playing field for manufacturers. NEMA provides value to the end-user and the manufacturing community with recommendations for when this scenario occurs.

Read the full article here.

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The Value Of Sensors, IoT, & Smart Lighting Data

EC&M Magazine recently ran an article about the value of sensors, IoT, and Smart Lighting Data. Energy ROI is an obvious benefit of advanced controls, but is often insufficient to justify the costs, after LED lighting has already slashed lighting energy use by more than 50%. In some places, lighting controls are installed to meet local code requirements.

EC&M Magazine recently ran an article about the value of sensors, IoT, and Smart Lighting Data. Energy ROI is an obvious benefit of advanced controls, but is often insufficient to justify the costs, after LED lighting has already slashed lighting energy use by more than 50%. In some places, lighting controls are installed to meet local code requirements.

Advanced lighting control systems go beyond just controlling the lights by allowing the gathering of data, bringing 10 to 100 times more value to the end-user. The easiest and most well-known solutions to achieve this are with occupancy sensors and daylight sensors. But what if one can get such data for an entire floor, building, or campus of buildings? This might be data that can tell how often a room is entered or how many cars are currently on a parking garage floor. How many customers went into the store today, and what portion of the parking lot is used at night? And is anyone still in the local park when it’s closed? This valuable data can be collected, analyzed, and communicated to learn much more about a site.

Since lighting is everywhere, when grouped under a network, it can then be used as a conduit from end-users to devices for valuable information. Asset tracking, contact tracing, and wayfinding are a few examples of how advanced lighting control systems are being used beyond controlling the lights. As an example, a building’s HVAC, fire alarm, and lighting system can use the same signal to turn off air intake and turn on all lights when the fire alarm is activated. The benefit of such information/signals gets even more valuable when shared with other manufacturers.

For example, you can share control of a room’s temperature using lighting control wall stations, or a demand response signal can be set up from the local electric utility to dim lights. This type of system will not only provide additional energy savings, but more importantly in some locations, it also satisfies a requirement to be code compliant. Such an ecosystem provides manufacturers’ and industries’ IoT products a backbone for advanced data and information at the heart of IoT. Air quality, structure vibration, and space utilization heatmaps are some examples of IoT applications.

Read the full article here.

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Product Monday: It’s Not A Window, It’s LightGlass

LIGHTGLASS is a windowlight, an architectural element that brings the experience of a daylit window into any space. Through the integration of the latest LED lighting technology into the form and materials of a window, LIGHTGLASS is nearly indiscernible from a real window.

LIGHTGLASS is a windowlight, an architectural element that brings the experience of a daylit window into any space. Through the integration of the latest LED lighting technology into the form and materials of a window, LIGHTGLASS is nearly indiscernible from a real window.

LIGHTGLASS is a patented, prefabricated UL-listed lighting system with the appearance of a window, with integrated aluminum extrusion, glass, gasketing, and LED light panel delivering 94+ CRI, UGR below 12, no perceptible flicker, greater than 89% uniformity, and an L70 rating of over 100,000 hours. LED drivers included, and a system warranty of a minimum of 5 years.

CCT (Correlated Color Temperature) ranges between 2200K and 6500K as a standard feature. It’s possible to specify a single static CCT or dynamic Tunable White: user-controlled changes in CCT, used to recreate the dynamic lighting conditions of a typical solar day. This can be achieved by pairing LIGHTGLASS with a 3rd-party control system.

LIGHTGLASS is designed to produce broad-spectrum light, similar to sunlight. Warm and cool tunable LEDs work in unison to create a dynamic and immersive circadian lighting experience.

LIGHTGLASS is designed to aid circadian health indoors, providing the recommended levels of vertical illuminance at eye level when applied as a clerestory or window. Units produce short wavelength 450nm-490nm light at higher CCTs, optimized for creating a circadian response. LIGHTGLASS meets the WELL Building Standard EML requirements for Working Environments, Learning Environments, Living Environments, and Break Rooms.

More information is available here.

 

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Trends In Flexible Lighting Design

Howard Yaphe, CEO of Axis Lighting, authored an interesting article in EC&M Magazine, recently, about trends in flexible lighting design.

Howard Yaphe, CEO of Axis Lighting, authored an interesting article in EC&M Magazine, recently, about trends in flexible lighting design. Conventional drop ceilings are being used less, in favor of more dynamic and adaptable office lighting solutions.

Open ceilings make a space look larger and better future-proof a design.  This approach can include line-voltage frameworks that create more design freedom for specifiers. The increased flexibility can aid offices in transitioning to post-pandemic trends of more flexible office usage.

Read the full article here.

 

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An Interview with Christina Halfpenny – Diversity, Inclusion & Culture at DLC

I had the pleasure of interviewing Christina Halfpenny about her approach to women in leadership positions, at the Design Lights Consortium (DLC), and on the subject more broadly.

I had the pleasure of interviewing Christina Halfpenny about her approach to women in leadership positions, at the Design Lights Consortium (DLC), and on the subject more broadly. There are a large number of very accomplished women in leadership positions at the DLC – many brought on board after Christina Halfpenny became Executive Director in 2015. DLC has grown into an independent international non-profit that drives energy efficiency and connected building solutions through solid-state lighting and controls, across North America. Halfpenny has been a strong advocate for diversity and representation on panels at every DLC meeting for the past several years, and in the imagery the organization uses on its website and in materials.

Of the DLC’s 21-member staff, more than half (12) are women, including Dorene Maniccia and Leora Radetsky, both with numerous published papers to their names, and Bernadette Boudreaux who co-leads a Diversity Equity Inclusion and Respect (DEIR) in Lighting Working Group, with the DOE. Also, Liesel Whitney-Schulte has over 20 years of experience working on utility energy efficiency programs and collaborating with lighting designers to create programs that simultaneously fit utility goals and promote quality lighting design. Bios of all the women on the DLC team are here: https://www.designlights.org/about-us/team/.

Shiller: More than 50% of DLC’s staff are women, despite the lighting industry historically being male-dominated. What advice do you have for other lighting industry executive leaders in a position to increase women’s representation, as well as diversity in hiring of all kinds (gender, race, sexual orientation, etc.)?

Halfpenny:  It isn’t just executive leaders in a position to hire women and diverse people. Every person in the hiring process can influence the diversity of their team, their vendors and suppliers, as well as leadership. Inclusion of people on hiring teams and questions from staff for prospective employees can help not only get a view into the organization’s dynamics, challenges and priorities, but also provide a relevant assessment of culture fit. These things can be overlooked if we are not taking a deliberate approach towards diversity in our hiring methods. With the ongoing changes in lighting and the industry, it’s an opportune time to prioritize diversity for the variety of perspective and experience that comes with a diverse team. There is always room for women and diversity in leadership; on Boards and in executive functions, but truly valuing diversity happens when space is made for diversity at all levels of the company.

Shiller: DLC has many recognized industry thought leaders on its staff, both women and men. Do you have any advice to other executives on recruiting and retaining elite industry talent, both women and men?

Halfpenny: On their behalf, thank you for the recognition. We are fortunate to have (and had) people on staff who are extremely knowledgeable and passionate about lighting and protecting the environment. Our team thrives on making a positive impact, and these folks leave their marks on the work we do and affect colleagues and peers in positive ways.

Ultimately, personal fulfillment leads to job retention. Look at the statistics of how many people recently left their jobs for something that paid less but provided more meaning and balance for them. Individuals also need to know that their contributions are valued by the company, however, we all know that individual performance is not the sole driver for success. I find that fulfillment from work comes not only from enjoying the actual work, but also the people.

Leadership at the DLC sets expectations for the entire team to contribute value and exchange ideas and feedback in a productive and respectful way. We prioritize an organizational culture that enables and supports collaboration, and collectively celebrates success, so that leading and learning are simultaneous for individual satisfaction and collective success.

Shiller: Are there ways that having a majority women staff has been advantageous to DLC? How has it changed the culture at DLC?

Halfpenny: Yes! As far as a change in culture at the DLC, we have always been a majority of women or 50%, and we have benefitted from a culture of support and respect. That culture generates increased capacity to listen and consider the impacts of our work on our stakeholders. While we prioritize collaboration internally, that resonates with our work externally with members, industry experts and stakeholders, which a key success factor for a Consortium.

In addition, having a balance of women in the organization brings more honesty about life outside of work.  For whatever reason, women are still juggling the majority of the home life – sick kids (and parents), doctor appointments, school activities, carpools, etc. – and we need to normalize that as a part of our lives. I hope if women can normalize it in leadership positions, and throughout the workplace, then men can too, and we will all benefit from a genuine work life balance.

Shiller: What’s your view of current efforts to increase women’s representation in lighting leadership positions? There are a couple organizations now working toward this goal (i.e. WILD, WIL, etc.)? Do you see specific women’s challenges that aren’t yet being addressed, in the lighting industry, that need to be addressed?

Halfpenny: Many of the women’s representation groups are providing much needed resources for mentoring, strategies to succeed and gaining visibility, particularly for younger women. There should be more efforts focused on inclusion and support to ensure that women and underrepresented groups have the resources they need to grow and be successful.

I do see many groups working on diversity who are made up of the diverse people themselves and that’s a little frustrating to see them doing all the work in this area. There have been a few changes in highly visible positions in the industry for women and diverse people, so change is happening, but we can’t lean on the minority to make it so. Everyone has a role to play in the change. As I mentioned previously, it’s in the hiring process, the procurement process and the values that shape the business culture.

Shiller: Thank you, Christina, for sharing your thoughts and expertise with our LightNOW readers.

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Lighting Industry Supply Chain Continues to Change

A recent LEDs Magazine article laid out ways that the lighting industry supply chain problems are not only changing constantly, but likely getting worse.

A recent LEDs Magazine article laid out ways that the lighting industry supply chain problems are not only changing constantly, but likely getting worse:

  • Shanghai lockdowns for roughly 6 weeks are significantly impacting both factories and the port there, adding delays. Shanghai is the world’s largest shipping port.
  • The war in Ukraine is impacting steel, aluminum, and some other commodity prices.
  • The microchip shortage continues to impact drivers and smart lighting components.
  • Commodity prices in general continue to rise.
  • Long-term container backlogs at US ports have eased, however, providing one bright spot.

You can read the full story here.

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