Category: Codes + Standards

Recent ANSI Standards Address Sky Glow, UV-LED Performance, Expanded Digital Lighting Control, and Tunable-White SSL

A variety of new and updated ANSI standards address topics as diverse as sky glow, UV-LED Performance, expanded digital lighting control, and tunable-white SSL products. Below are quick summaries of each one, with links to more information.

A variety of new and updated ANSI standards address topics as diverse as sky glow, UV-LED Performance, expanded digital lighting control, and tunable-white SSL products. Below are quick summaries of each one, with links to more information.

Sky Glow, ANSI/IES TM-37-21:

This document provides guidance on the means of reducing human contributions to light in the night sky and information on estimating the relative effectiveness of the different options available. It describes the causes, characteristics, and potential impacts of human-based sky glow, and provides the current state of the science for conducting estimations to facilitate its quantification and control. Virtually all lighting applications with exposure to the exterior environment fall within this purview, including street and area lighting, sports lighting, signage, and advertisement lighting, industrial lighting, light escaping the interior of commercial and residential buildings via windows, and landscape lighting. The beginning steps of a proactive response from the lighting community toward addressing the panoply of concerns are presented in the most well-rounded and practical manner possible. Improved understanding and estimation of the associated sources, quantities, characteristics, and resulting behaviors of light entering the night sky are essential components of a comprehensive remediation strategy. More information here.

UV-LED Performance, ANSI/IES/IUVA LM-92-22:

The Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) and International Ultraviolet Association (IUVA) recently published the first standard on the measurement of UV product emissions in a series of planned American National Standards. ANSI/IES/IUVA LM-92-22 Approved Method: Optical and Electrical Measurement of Ultraviolet LEDs details a method for repeatable laboratory testing and measurement of UV-LED optical and electrical performance characteristics. LM-92 covers measurement of UV LEDs in the wavelength range of 200 nm to 400 nm under continuous-pulse operation. LEDs with wavelengths longer than 360 nm are covered in ANSI/IES LM-85-20. More information at LEDs Magazine here.

Expanded Digital Lighting Control, ANSI C137.4-2021:

Harmonization of international standards related to DALI lighting control continues with the publication of the updated ANSI C137.4-2021 standard in North America. ANSI C137.4-2021 builds on the international standard IEC 62386 (which underpins the DALI communication protocol) and has additional characteristics and features that align very closely with the D4i family of specifications from the DALI Alliance, a global lighting-industry organization.

D4i and ANSI C137.4-2021 specify the digital communication interface between luminaires and devices including sensors and network lighting controllers (NLCs). As well as including power-supply requirements, the standards define data models based on memory banks that enable the exchange of data. Implementation of these standards enables smart, connected luminaires, as well as interoperability between LED drivers and luminaire-mounted control devices. More information at inside.lighting here.

Tunable White SSL, ANSI/IES TM-38-21:

The ability to emit radiant power in hundreds or thousands of spectral combinations—only limited by the precision of the control signal being provided—poses a distinct challenge for measuring product performance. TM-38-21 establishes a common protocol for measuring photometric, colorimetric, and electrical characteristics of tunable-white solid-state lighting products—including lamps, luminaires, and light engines. It defines the minimum number and order in which measurements are to be made, and it provides a framework for data reporting. This TM also describes a method for interpolating between measured data, including for CCT range, Duv range, lumen output range (at full intensity control as color changes), efficacy at maximum output, efficacy range, color rendition, and chromaticity coordinates.

The protocol described herein applies to products for which the spectral power distribution can be adjusted with a single, one-dimensional input having a quantitative, interval format, either continuous or discrete, that is nominally independent of luminous flux control. The method described does not apply to products that intentionally change chromaticity with luminous flux (e.g., dim-to-warm), nor products with multiple color-control input signals (e.g., full-color-tunable) that cannot be set to operate with a single color-control input signal. More information here.

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NEMA Published Recommendations For Replacing HID Lamps With LED Lamps

In February, 2022, NEMA published NEMA LL-10, Replacing HID Lamps with LED Lamps: Light Output Equivalency Claims. This document describes a method for claiming equivalency of LED lamps to the HID lamps they replace.

In February, 2022, NEMA published NEMA LL-10, Replacing HID Lamps with LED Lamps: Light Output Equivalency Claims. This document describes a method for claiming equivalency of LED lamps to the HID lamps they replace. The NEMA standard applies to omnidirectional lamps. (The equivalency for directional lamps is more complicated and requires simulation or mockups to establish). The intention is for manufacturers to use LL-10 when they prepare their equivalency claims.

Replacing high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps with light-emitting diode (LED) equivalents should be an easy and straightforward endeavor. However, currently, there are significant variations in the luminous flux (light output) of LED lamps claiming to be equivalent to a particular HID lamp wattage. When this happens, customer confusion and dissatisfaction can ensue and result in an unlevel playing field for manufacturers. NEMA provides value to the end-user and the manufacturing community with recommendations for when this scenario occurs.

Read the full article here.

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DLC Releases New Logos For Each QPL Impacting Product Marketing Materials

The DesignLights Consortium (DLC) has released four new logos, allowing manufacturers and distributors to indicate which products are listed on each of the four DLC Qualified Product Lists (QPLs).

The DesignLights Consortium (DLC) has released four new logos, allowing manufacturers and distributors to indicate which products are listed on each of the four DLC Qualified Product Lists (QPLs). The four updated logos are designed for use with products approved for the DLC’s Solid-State Lighting (SSL) and Networked Lighting Controls (NLC), Horticultural Lighting, and LUNA qualified products lists (QPL). Effective April 21, 2022, these logos are valid to indicate qualification on the DLC QPLs.

The DLC encourages all manufacturers with listed products to update their marketing materials with the new logos, which can be found on the DLC Marketing Toolkit webpage. For proper use of the logos, refer to the Logo Use Quick Guide and the full Logo and Trademark Use Guidelines.

The DLC does not expect manufacturers to immediately update older materials but encourages updating as soon as is feasible. For the time being, old QPL logos are still valid to identify DLC qualified products, and QPL users should note that they may still see the old logos used to indicate qualification. The DLC recommends that users looking for qualified products always verify the listing on the individual QPLs. If you have questions about the new logos or updating your marketing materials, contact DLC at info@designlights.org.

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NEMA Publishes ANSI Standard For Standby Power Measurement In Lighting

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) published American National Standard for Lighting Systems—Non-Active Mode Power Measurement ANSI C137.63103-2021. 

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) published American National Standard for Lighting Systems—Non-Active Mode Power Measurement ANSI C137.63103-2021.

This newly published standard adopts IEC 63103, ed1.0 (2020-07) as a nationally acknowledged international standard with deviations. It provides manufacturers and testing laboratories with a harmonized way of determining standby power consumption for lighting systems, eliminating duplicative testing and streamlining global commerce.

“This regional adoption of an IEC standard benefits the industry by closely aligning lighting system standby power measurement with our international counterparts,” said Ernesto Mendoza, Senior Manager, Signify North America Corporation, and C137 Workgroup Chair.

ANSI C137.63103-2021 is available on the NEMA website for $50. Read the full NEMA press release here.

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ioXt Certification Expands To Include Network Lighting Controls

The ioXt Alliance, a global standard for Internet of Things (IoT) product security, is expanding its ioXt Certification Program with a new profile for network lighting controls (NLC), allowing manufacturers to certify commercial lighting systems with wirelessly connected parts.

The ioXt Alliance, a global standard for Internet of Things (IoT) product security, is expanding its ioXt Certification Program with a new profile for network lighting controls (NLC), allowing manufacturers to certify commercial lighting systems with wirelessly connected parts. Aligned with the initiatives set forth by the DesignLights Consortium (DLC), which satisfies the NLC5 requirements, the new ioXt NLC Profile brings transparency and visibility to enterprise buyers in the commercial lighting space.

With a concentration on security, upgradability, transparency, and compliance, the ioXt Certification Program evaluates products against the eight ioXt pledge principles requiring that the devices will be tested against clear guidelines for quantifying the optimal level of security. The NLC profile is an efficient and cost-effective standard process for commercial lighting manufacturers to become DLC-compliant.

Once a manufacturer receives the ioXt stamp of approval, this satisfies the DLC’s cybersecurity requirements and the product is eligible for qualification, which is required for many rebates offered by efficiency programs throughout North America.

Read the full article here.

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Cybersecurity-Related Additions to DLC NLC5

The DesignLights Consortium (DLC) recently announced two additions to its Networked Lighting Controls (NLC) Technical Requirements, Version 5. These additions became effective December 22, 2021.

The DesignLights Consortium (DLC) recently announced two additions to its Networked Lighting Controls (NLC) Technical Requirements, Version 5. These additions became effective December 22, 2021.

These are:

  • The DLC now recognizes the PSA-certified cybersecurity standard with Chip Level 2 or 3 certification and with System Level 1, 2, or 3, and Device Level 1, 2, or 3 certification. This certification may now be used to meet the NLC5 cybersecurity requirement.
  • The DLC now recognizes accredited certifications from an organization accredited as “Management Systems Certification Bodies” by the International Accreditation Service (IAS) as valid proof of compliance with the ISO 27001 cybersecurity standard.

NLC5 becomes required February 28, 2022. Products that comply with NLC4 but not NLC5 will be de-listed.

Click here to learn more.

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New NEMA Standard For Street & Area Light Internal Energy Metering

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) published American National Standard for Roadway and Area Lighting Equipment—Metering Performance Requirements for LED Drivers with Integral Energy Measurement (ANSI C136.52-2021).

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) published American National Standard for Roadway and Area Lighting Equipment—Metering Performance Requirements for LED Drivers with Integral Energy Measurement (ANSI C136.52-2021). This new standard establishes acceptable metering performance criteria for LED drivers with built-in (integral to the driver) energy consumption measurement functionality for use in outdoor luminaire applications. It describes two metering device performance levels for roadway and area lighting applications: 2% Accuracy Class and 5% Accuracy Class.

This standard is written for use by roadway and area lighting component manufacturers, municipal and regional governments specifying outdoor lighting solutions, and street lighting offices/bureaus. ANSI C136.52-2021 is available on the NEMA website for $70.

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DLC Releases LUNA Technical Requirements Version 1.0 To Reduce Light Pollution

The Design Lights Consortium (DLC) released LUNA Versions 1.0 Technical Requirements for outdoor LED luminaires. The requirements limit sky glow, light trespass and mitigate light pollution.  LUNA products will appear…

The Design Lights Consortium (DLC) released LUNA Versions 1.0 Technical Requirements for outdoor LED luminaires. The requirements limit sky glow, light trespass and

mitigate light pollution.  LUNA products will appear as a subset of luminaires listed on the SSL Qualified Products List (QPL) and will be eligible for efficiency rebates and incentives designed for SSL V5.1 products. DLC Executive Director and CEO Christina Halfpenny said, “LUNA will streamlin

e the process of selecting efficient outdoor lighting products that minimize sky glow and light trespass while still yielding the efficiency benefits of LED lighting.”

LUNA will also help specifiers to fulfill the light pollution and trespass requirements of LEED and WELL building programs, and help projects follow application guidance in the joint IDA-IES Model Lighting Ordinance. According to the International Dark Sky Association (IDA), a third of all outdoor lighting in the US is wasted, costing facility owners some $3.3 billion annually and responsible for 21 million tons of carbon emissions annually.

The DLC notes, however, that the technical requirements apply only to white-light LED outdoor products, which does not include non-white (amber) luminaires, which are appropriate for settings such as environmentally sensitive areas. This is because standardized metrics are still in development for non-white light. The DLC anticipates that manufacturers will be able to apply to list products for LUNA qualification on the SSL QPL in the first quarter of 2022.

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NEMA Publishes The First LED Driver Robustness Test Methods Standard

NEMA announced it has published American National Standard for Lighting Equipment—LED Drivers Robustness (ANSI C82.15-2021)

NEMA announced it has published American National Standard for Lighting Equipment—LED Drivers Robustness (ANSI C82.15-2021). This is the first standard defining test procedures for LED driver robustness, and applies to hardware and microcontroller and microprocessor-based LED drivers. The test methods confirm a driver’s ability to withstand specific stresses.

This document’s core audience is LED driver manufacturers and testing laboratories. ANSI C82.15-2021 is available on the NEMA website for $100.

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ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR: Outcome-Based Energy Codes

My lighting column for the November 2021 issue of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR tackles outcome-based energy codes.

My lighting column for the November 2021 issue of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR tackles outcome-based energy codes.

Excerpt:

Codes are complex and sometimes confusing, sometimes requiring interpretation by the authority having jurisdiction. Because there is no national code, the country is a patchwork of codes. Energy codes only regulate design efficiency and are therefore limited to being predictive of energy savings based on estimates and modeling.

Going back more than a decade, some policymakers began working to simplify energy codes while addressing their shortcomings. Instead of a prescriptive-based (design within limitations, with some mandatory items) or performance-based (intensive modeling) compliance path, codes would evolve to be outcome-based, using a building’s actual measured/metered energy performance as the compliance metric.

It’s not an easy nut to crack, but the benefits continue to attract the interest of policy makers, particularly in California.

Click here to check it out.

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