Category: Codes + Standards

IES Approves Seven Standards

The IES announced the publication of seven recently approved standards.

Image: IES.org

The IES announced the publication of seven recently approved standards:

  • ANSI/IES RP-1-22 Recommended Practice: Lighting Office Spaces. Includes New content for Home Office Lighting
  • ANSI/IES RP-27.1-22 Recommended Practice: Risk Group Classification and Minimization of Photobiological Hazards from Ultraviolet Lamps and Lamp Systems. New Standard which provides metrics to minimize risk exposures to ultraviolet (UV) “light”.
  • ANSI/IES RP-6-22 Recommended Practice: Lighting Sports and Recreational Areas. Includes new content for Broadcast lighting for sports areas, pickleball courts, and more.
  • ANSI/IES RP-29-22 Recommended Practice: Lighting for Hospital and Healthcare Facilities. Includes new content about patient & facility controls, MRI rooms, decontamination methods, and telemedicine lighting.
  • ANSI/IES LM-93-22 Approved Method: Optical and Electrical Measurements of Far UV-C Excimer Sources. A new optical/electrical testing method for “far UV-C (200nm-230nm) light sources for potential disinfection applications, lower photobiological risk, and less ozone generation.
  • ANSI/IES RP-38-22 Recommended Practice: Lighting Performance for Small to Medium Sized Videoconference Rooms. Re-affirmation of RP-38-17.
  • IES G-1-22 Guide for Security Lighting for People, Property, and Critical Infrastructure. Re-affirmation of G-1-16.

All seven standards will soon be available at the IES Webstore and Lighting Library .

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DLC Horticultural Lighting Technical Requirements V3.0 Final Will Be Released November 30, 2022

On Wednesday, November 30, the DLC will release the final version of the horticultural lighting Technical Requirements V3.0 to support the acceleration of energy efficient lighting in controlled environment agriculture (CEA).

On Wednesday, November 30, the DLC will release the final version of the horticultural lighting Technical Requirements V3.0 to support the acceleration of energy efficient lighting in controlled environment agriculture (CEA). Here is a summary of the changes in Hort V3.0:

  • Increase efficacy threshold
  • Report application (intended use) information
  • Require product-level controllability capabilities
  • Require LM-79 and TM-33 reporting
  • Surveillance Testing Policy

Learn more at the final release webinar scheduled for Wednesday December 14 from 1-2pm ET.

More information about the horticultural lighting technical requirements is available here.

Register for the DLC webinar here.

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ENERGY STAR Proposes Sunset Of Lamps, Luminaires & Ceiling Fan Light Kit Programs

On Monday, November 14, 2022, ENERGY STAR issued a memo proposing to sunset its Lamps, Luminaires, and Ceiling Fan Light Kit programs.

On Monday, November 14, 2022, ENERGY STAR issued a memo proposing to sunset its Lamps, Luminaires, and Ceiling Fan Light Kit programs. It’s not uncommon for ENERGY STAR to sunset product categories after DOE has issued appliance efficiency standards that eliminate most of the savings potential for an ENERGY STAR category. Such a DOE standards increase also eliminates savings potential for utilities, triggering an end to rebates for a category.

In this case it was the DOE 45 lpW general service lamp “backstop” that is causing ENERGY STAR to propose sunsetting the lighting categories. Here are the key take aways from ENERGY STAR’s proposal:

  • ENERGY STAR is taking comments on the proposal and timeline through January 6, 2023.
  • The proposal is to sunset ENERGY STAR for lamps, luminaires, and ceiling fan light kits effective the end of 2024.
  • To stop accepting new certifications for these products at the end of 2023.
  • To remove lighting requirements from the ENERGY STAR specifications for ceiling fans and ventilation fans, at the end of 2023.
  • EPA believes many utilities will cease residential lighting rebates by the end of 2023.

The full EPA proposal memo is available here.

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IES Publishes Updated Recommended Practice For People In Outdoor Environments

The IES has published an update to its recommended practice for people in outdoor environments: ANSI/IES RP-43-22, Recommended Practice: Lighting Exterior Applications.

The IES has published an update to its recommended practice for people in outdoor environments: ANSI/IES RP-43-22, Recommended Practice: Lighting Exterior Applications.

Image: IES

This document provides pedestrian-oriented illumination recommendations for the reassurance, safety, comfort, amenity, and enjoyment of people in outdoor environments. This RP takes a comprehensive approach and makes recommendations based on lighting zone, glare avoidance, spectrum, and other visually influential conditions. Application of these recommendations will ultimately enhance the visual experience for people, while also respecting the environment.

Chapters:

1.0 Introduction and Scope

2.0 General Information for Outdoor Pedestrian Applications

3.0 Considerations for Pedestrian Vision

4.0 Lighting Design for People in Outdoor Environments

The new ANSI/IES RP-43-22 can be purchased from IES here.

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Four Changes In The 2023 National Electric Code Impacting Lighting

The National Electrical Code (NEC) updates every three years. David summarizes four changes in this code cycle (2023 edition of the NEC) that impact lighting.

The National Electrical Code (NEC) updates every three years. Here are four changes this code cycle (2023 edition of the NEC) that impact lighting:

Images: pixabay.com

Horticultural Lighting

To address certain potential hazards in the horticultural lighting industry, Sec. 410.184 clarifies that GFCI protection is required where the horticultural lighting is connected with flexible cords using separable connectors or attachment plugs. A new Exception allows lighting equipment supplied with circuits over 150V to be protected with a listed special-purpose ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) that trips at 20mA instead of 6mA.

Wiring and Equipment Installed Above Hazardous (Classified) Locations

Section 511.17 went through a significant transformation as it was reorganized into a list format with additional requirements for listed fittings and equipment grounding conductors (EGCs) added to the mix. The term “Class I” was replaced by “Hazardous (Classified)” in five locations, including the title of this Section, as the zone classification system no longer uses the “Class I” designation. This Section was also reorganized from a long paragraph into nine list items for usability, and requirements were added to most of the wiring methods.

Receptacles, Luminaires, and Switches

The requirements for GFCI protection of receptacles in (A)(4) were expanded this cycle in Sec. 680.22 to include all receptacles rated 60A or less within 20 ft of a pool wall. This previously only applied to 15A and 20A, 125V receptacles. This Section also requires GFCI protection for specific equipment installed in the area between 5 ft and 10 ft horizontally from the inside walls of a pool. New language in (B)(4) expands the required protection by adding an SPGFCI requirement that will allow equipment operating above 150V to ground to also be protected.

Class-2-Powered Emergency Lighting Systems

A new Sec. 700.11 for Class 2 wiring provides the requirements for these systems. This new Section addresses technologies such as PoE and other emergency lighting systems that utilize Class 2 power. The other rules in this Article address line voltage systems, and this new Section provides requirements for low-voltage emergency systems.

 

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Zhaga Establishes Smart City Sensor Awards

The Zhaga Consortium is launching the global Zhaga Smart City Sensor Awards to address the needs of many cities that have installed Zhaga-D4i certified streetlights. The awards encourage and recognize excellence in smart city sensors that can be installed on streetlights using the Zhaga Book 18 standard and are suitable for Zhaga-D4i certification.

The Zhaga Consortium is launching the global Zhaga Smart City Sensor Awards to address the needs of many cities that have installed Zhaga-D4i certified streetlights. The awards encourage and recognize excellence in smart city sensors that can be installed on streetlights using the Zhaga Book 18 standard and are suitable for Zhaga-D4i certification.

Image: Zhagastandard.org

The awards are open to sensor manufacturers as well as universities and students. The Zhaga Consortium has created and further developed a new universal platform for streetlighting connectivity by offering Zhaga Book 18 “Smart interface between outdoor luminaires and sensing / communication modules” to the market. This platform allows streetlights to be the backbone of smart cities. Streetlights are regularly positioned, secure, powered and in a great location for many sensing tasks and for communications. With over 200 hundred families of Zhaga-D4i luminaires from some of the world’s leading manufacturers already certified, it becomes the cheapest way for city-wide deployment of smart sensors.

All award submissions must be received at info@Zhagastandard.org by 17:00 Amsterdam time on December 16th, 2022. There is no cost to enter. Winners will be announced in February 2023. Commercial participants who win the award will receive public recognition and are entitled to make specific reference to the award in marketing material (a digital badge will be provided). Public recognition means specifically
that an article will be submitted to a leading international lighting publication,
promotion via social media channels and prominent placement on the Zhaga website.
Runner-ups will receive a digital certificate. Students and researchers from recognized educational institutions are eligible for a 2000€ prize under the Research and Innovation categories. Runner-ups will receive a digital certificate. The payout of the prize to students/researchers will be done according to the policies of their educational institution.

Sensor Categories:

  • Mobility: Counting vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrian traffic and/or measuring vehicle speeds
  • Climate: Measuring temperature, humidity, and other climatic parameters
  • Pollutants: Measuring particulates or other pollutants
  • Sound: Detecting high levels of ambient noise (including potentially identifying
    sonic signatures consistent with excessive construction or industrial noise,
    vehicle accidents, distressed shouting or barking dogs)
  • Lighting Controls: Motion detection and other sensors that control lighting levels
    (excluding photocells)
  • Multi Sensor: Sensors combining two or more of the above categories of functionality
  • Innovation: Other types of sensors with functionality not described above for which entrants can make a compelling public benefits case
  • Research: Any type of sensor (not restricted to the above list) developed by a student or researcher from a recognized educational institution that the party submitting can make a compelling public benefits case for

More information is available here.

Image: Zhagastandard.org

 

Image: Zhagastandard.org

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US Government Launching Labeling Program For Cybersecurity Of IoT Devices

The Biden administration said it will launch a cybersecurity labeling program for consumer Internet of Things (IoT) devices starting in 2023 in an effort to protect Americans from “significant national security risks.”

The Biden administration said it will launch a cybersecurity labeling program for consumer Internet of Things (IoT) devices starting in 2023 in an effort to protect Americans from “significant national security risks.”

Image: Bryce Durbin / TechCrunch

Inspired by ENERGY STAR, a labeling program operated by US EPA to promote energy efficiency, the White House is planning to roll out a similar IoT labeling program to the “highest-risk” devices starting next year, a senior Biden administration official said following a recent National Security Council meeting with consumer product associations and device manufacturers.

The initiative, described by White House officials as “ENERGY STAR for cyber,” will help Americans to recognize whether devices meet a set of basic cybersecurity standards devised by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

Though specifics of the program have not yet been confirmed, the administration said it will “keep things simple.” The labels, which will be “globally recognized” and debut on devices such as routers and home cameras, will take the form of a “barcode” that users can scan using their smartphone rather than a static paper label, the administration official said. The scanned barcode will link to information based on standards, such as software updating policies, data encryption and vulnerability remediation.

The announcement comes after the White House last year ordered NIST and the FTC to explore two labeling pilot programs on cybersecurity capabilities for IoT devices. It also comes after the U.K. government last year introduced an IoT security bill in Parliament, requiring device manufacturers, importers, and distributors to meet certain cybersecurity standards.

Read the full story in TechCrunch here.

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It Matters: CSA Releases The Matter 1.0 Interoperability Standard For Smart Home IoT

The Connectivity Standards Alliance (CSA) released the Matter 1.0 specification and the opening of the Matter certification program on October 4th.

The Connectivity Standards Alliance (CSA) released the Matter 1.0 specification and the opening of the Matter certification program on October 4th. Member companies that make up all facets of the IoT now have a complete program for bringing the next generation of interoperable products that work across brands and platforms to market with greater privacy, security, and simplicity for consumers.

Image courtesy of Connectivity Standards Alliance

As part of the Matter 1.0 release, authorized test labs are open for product certification, the test harnesses and tools are available, and the open-source reference design software development kit (SDK) is complete – all to bring new, innovative products to market. Further, Alliance members with devices already deployed and with plans to update their products to support Matter can now do so, once their products are certified.

Over 280 member companies — including AmazonAppleComcastGoogleSamsung SmartThings, and Signify — have brought their technologies, experience, and innovations together to ensure Matter met the needs of all stakeholders, including users, product makers, and platforms. Collectively, these companies led the way through requirements and specification development, reference design, multiple test events, and final specification validation to reach this industry milestone.

More than just a specification, the Matter 1.0 standard launches with test cases and comprehensive test tools for Alliance members and a global certification program including eight authorized test labs that are primed to test not only Matter, but also Matter’s underlying network technologies, Wi-Fi and Thread. Wi-Fi enables Matter devices to interact over a high-bandwidth local network and allows smart home devices to communicate with the cloud. Thread provides an energy-efficient and highly reliable mesh network within the home. Both the Wi-Fi Alliance and Thread Group partnered with the Connectivity Standards Alliance to help realize the complete vision of Matter.

This initial release of Matter, running over Ethernet, Wi-Fi, and Thread, and using Bluetooth Low Energy for device commissioning, will support lighting and other common smart home products, including electrical, HVAC controls, window coverings, and shades, safety and security sensors, door locks, media devices including TVs, controllers as both devices and applications, and bridges.

Read the full CSA announcement here.

 

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Proposed 2024 IECC Commercial Code Would Reduce New Commercial Building Energy Use

The Public Comment Draft #1 of the 2024 International Energy Conservation Code Commercial Provisions was released on September 6, 2022. With buildings currently representing 39% of U.S. carbon emissions, leading jurisdictions recognize the importance of using building codes and performance policies to respond to the effects of climate change and reduce future risks.

The Public Comment Draft #1 of the 2024 International Energy Conservation Code Commercial Provisions was released on September 6, 2022. With buildings currently representing 39% of U.S. carbon emissions, leading jurisdictions recognize the importance of using building codes and performance policies to respond to the effects of climate change and reduce future risks. To keep temperature rise below 1.5 degrees Celsius, new construction in the U.S. must be all-electric by 2025, and climate-optimized by 2030. With just one code development cycle before 2025, and only three to reach 2030, the provisions adopted into the 2024 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) are critical to achieve the model code needed to mitigate buildings’ contributions to climate change.

From 2006 to 2021, the IECC increased its efficiency requirements by about 40%, or an average of 8% a cycle. The 2024 IECC continues to reduce the energy use of buildings with efficiency and for the first time includes onsite renewable energy and grid integration requirements. The lighting provisions of the draft 2024 IECC model energy code are located on pages 266 to 291, of the draft model commercial building code, which can be downloaded here.

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New Code For Existing Building Decarbonization Overlays 2021 IECC

A new model code from the New Buildings Institute (NBI) is designed to help cities tackle emissions, specifically from the large stock of existing buildings. The model code Existing Building Decarbonization Code was published on Sept. 19, 2022. It is considered an overlay to the 2021 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and an addition to the Building Decarbonization Code published by NBI in 2020.

A new model code from the New Buildings Institute (NBI) is designed to help cities tackle emissions, specifically from the large stock of existing buildings. The model code Existing Building Decarbonization Code was published on Sept. 19, 2022. It is considered an overlay to the 2021 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and an addition to the Building Decarbonization Code published by NBI in 2020.

NBI describes the code as “a new way for jurisdictions to reduce carbon emissions.” It will also help them “meet climate action plan goals and interconnected goals around public health and equity.”

New construction only accounts for a very small percentage of building activity in a given year, less than 2%. According to NBI, the effort to reduce building emissions must focus on existing stock to have a significant impact. NBI recognizes the enormity of the problem, noting that the United States currently has 5.9 million existing commercial buildings, which account for 97 billion square feet of space. However, it also sees the potential for significant reductions, projecting that cities could cut about 30% of all urban emissions by 2050 if they were to require existing buildings to be more energy efficient.

Some of the key technologies identified by the code to help existing buildings reduce their emissions include efficiency, on-site renewable energy generation, electric vehicle charging, and battery storage. Of course, lighting upgrades are often one of the most cost-effective energy efficiency measures available. Finally, while the code embraces an all-electric path for buildings, it is also flexible and includes options for an approach based on “mixed fuels,” including natural gas.

Read the full article in Electrical Contractor Magazine here.

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