Category: Controls

Product Monday: Ubicquia Platform Creates Smart Cities With Existing Streetlights

Ubicquia has released two streetlight platforms designed for smart cities that integrates Wi-Fi, 4K cameras, directional microphones and neural artificial intelligence (AI) processors.

Electronics 360 recently ran an article about a smart city platform startup called Ubicquia. The new company has released two streetlight platforms designed for smart cities that integrates Wi-Fi, 4K cameras, directional microphones and neural artificial intelligence (AI) processors.

Called UbiHub, the platforms are compatible with more than 360 million existing streetlights worldwide and can be installed in seconds into the existing streetlight photocell socket. The platforms allow cities and law enforcement to transform existing streetlights into a network of connected digital assets. UbiHub can enhance existing use cases by:

  • Enabling faster crime detection, investigation, and deterrence.
  • Reducing traffic congestion.
  • Improving pedestrian safety.
  • Increasing bicycle lane utilization.
  • Expanding city broadband deployments to commercial areas and parks.

The UbiHub AP6 is a triband Wi-Fi access point that gives communities and municipalities the ability to enable public Wi-Fi. It uses power over Ethernet to support third-party equipment including cameras or license plate readers.

The more advanced UbiHub AP/AI includes the same features as the AP6 but also integrated dual 4K cameras, direction microphones, a neural AI processor and 15 days of video storage.

The platforms are managed and monitored by Ubicquia’s cloud visualization and analytics management system called UbiVu. The system also support APIs that integrate with third party video management systems, evidence clearance platforms and police real-time crime centers.

Ubicquia has already deployed the systems to several cities in the U.S.:

  • West Hollywood, California – The city is using the platforms for smart city traffic and curb management capabilities for data on traffic, bicycle and pedestrians as well as public safety measures and future planning development needs for its residents.
  • County of Hawai’i – UbiHub is being used to bring free, high-speed internet to Pana’ewa Park, a recreational and educational area in a zoological and botanical area of the county. The city said the deployment of the streetlight platform is an important step to expanding its broadband and closing the digital divide throughout Hawai’i Island.
  • Ontario, California – 12,500 UbiCells were deployed in Ontario, California, for smart lighting analytics and energy savings. The city said the system helps address the digital divide by rolling out public Wi-Fi and boosting public safety in one platform.

The full article is available here.

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Product Monday: Pharos Architectural Controls Transform Ely Cathedral

As part of the Church of England’s commitment to being carbon neutral by 2030, renovations are being undertaken at the historic Ely Cathedral in East Cambridgeshire, England. To help achieve this, the lighting at Ely Cathedral is currently being upgraded to a more energy-efficient and sustainable system. 

Ely Cathedral is located in the city of Ely, in East Cambridgeshire, England The site can be dated back to AD 763, when it began as an abbey church built by St Etheldreda. The current building dates from 1083, and Ely was elevated to cathedral status in 1109.

As part of the Church of England, Ely Cathedral is committed to being carbon neutral by 2030. To help achieve this, the lighting at Ely Cathedral is currently being upgraded to a more energy-efficient and sustainable system. The work has been split into phases, with phase 1 focusing on the exterior of the Cathedral’s Octagon Tower.

While the Cathedral is primarily a place of worship, it is also an important heritage attraction, a venue for music and events, and an occasional location for filming. It was important to ensure that any new lighting scheme was capable of showing the architecture off to its full potential, while supporting a range of uses and enhancing the Cathedral’s daily round of worship. The new system will reveal more of the detail and beauty of the building, while being less visually intrusive.

The project’s goal was to remove the existing flood lighting and create a more flexible and controllable design, while offering increased energy efficiency. The flexibility of the lighting controls is important, as it allows the Cathedral to use colors and dynamic lighting to mark special occasions or events, such as red, white and blue for the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee, or the colors of the liturgical calendar. The previous lighting allowed for only a single color. In addition, the new system has removed the need for someone to change the lighting manually when required, which incurred time and cost.

To deliver the control aspect of the exterior lighting design, Pharos Architectural Controls were used. A Pharos TPC (Touch Panel Controller) is now used by the Cathedral, offering a customizable 4.3” touch screen with a single Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) network connection. The touch screen interface allows Ely Cathedral to create multiple pages of controls and configure their appearance to provide immediate visual feedback.

The Pharos TPC allows for control of lighting levels and playbacks that can transition between scenes, timelines, effects and pixel-mapped media. To increase functionality, a Pharos EXT was also used. The EXT is an extension for the Pharos TPC and together they form a standalone, mains-powered lighting control system with flexible output and show control options. The EXT also provides local DMX and DALI output for the TPC, as well as power and other hardware interfaces.

Project credits: 

Lighting Consultant: Lighting Perceptions

Installation: Bullens

Stakeholder: Funded by Friends

Lighting Control: Pharos Architectural Control

Lighting Fixture Manufacturer:  Studio Due

More information on Pharos Architectural Controls is available here.

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New Zhaga Books Address In-Field Programming Of Smart Lighting

In February, 2022, Zhaga approved Book 25 “NFC Readers with Bluetooth Interface for In-Field Programming”. This new Zhaga specification defines a Bluetooth Low Energy communication protocol for the communication between the field-maintenance application on a smart device and the Near Field Communication (NFC) reader.

In February, 2022, Zhaga approved Book 25 “NFC Readers with Bluetooth Interface for In-Field Programming”. This new Zhaga specification defines a Bluetooth Low Energy communication protocol for the communication between the field-maintenance application on a smart device and the Near Field Communication (NFC) reader. Together with Book 24, which describes the programming of luminaire components using NFC, these specifications solve the data management problems of smart luminaires with interoperable maintenance tools, enabling configurable luminaires that are easy to service over their entire lifecycle.

An increasing number of lighting applications require reading out parameters and changing settings of LED drivers in the field. Manufacturers of LED luminaires currently use a variety of methods for in-field programming. The new Zhaga NFC Books give installers, system integrators and utility companies the option to select just one programming tool which works with all field-maintenance applications from all vendors implementing Book 25, and all NFC-programmable devices implementing Book 24.

Zhaga Book 25 builds on Book 24 “Programming of Luminaire Components Using NFC”, and adds mobile NFC Readers with a Bluetooth Low Energy interface. It enables maintenance and replaceability with a cross-vendor harmonized method of NFC programming for in-field use.

The specification defines a Bluetooth Low Energy GATT-Service which NFC Reader manufacturers can implement for the communication between the field-maintenance application on a smart device (cell phone, tablet, etc.) and the NFC reader. This allows the field-maintenance application to read and write parameters on NFC enabled LED drivers without the need for a cable-based connection. Field maintenance with Book 25 may also be used for other components requiring programming, such as sensors or connectivity nodes.

Zhaga has also developed the Zhaga-NFC certification program for Book
24 and Book 25 which is available for Regular and Associate Zhaga
members and is provided by Zhaga accredited test centers listed on the
Zhaga website. Only certified NFC readers and NFC-programmable devices can carry the Zhaga-NFC logo. This certification builds trust in the interoperability of components. More information is available here.

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Big Activity With U.S. Computer Chip Manufacturing

Many LED drivers, luminaire controllers, and lighting control systems rely on computer chips. The COVID-19 pandemic created major disruptions to the global computer chip supply, affecting everything from cars to computers to all types of consumer electronic products.

Many LED drivers, luminaire controllers, and lighting control systems rely on computer chips. The COVID-19 pandemic created major disruptions to the global computer chip supply, affecting everything from cars to computers to all types of consumer electronic products.

THE CHIPS AND SCIENCE ACT OF 2022

Last week, the U.S. House and Senate each passed the CHIPS and Science Act, which provides $52 Billion to boost domestic production of computer chips, but also contains worker training funds and prevailing wage requirements for employers in the semiconductor industry. At the time of writing this article (7/31), the bill was on President Joe Biden’s desk, awaiting his expected signature. The law will direct $40 Billion to increase manufacturing, and $12 Billion for R&D. Today, only 12% of high-end semiconductor manufacturing is done in the U.S. The CHIPS and Science Act is expected to significantly increase that percentage.

INTEL PLANT

In January of this year, Intel announced plans for a new $20 Billion computer chip manufacrturing hub near Columbus, OH. The company expects it to grow to become one of the largest semiconductor manufacturing sites in the world. Back in June, Intel’s CEO warned that the new plant was in jeopardy if the Congress didn’t pass the CHIPS and Science Act. That issue is resolved with the Senate and House passage of the bill, last week.

SAMSUNG PLANT

In November 2021, Samsung announced its plan to build a $17 Billion computer chip factory, outside Austin, TX. To reinforce the deal, President Biden visited a Samsung plant in South Korea, during his recent visit, in May, 2022.

The three actions above represent $89 Billion of new investment in the US semiconductor production industry. This will boost the US economy and reduce computer chip costs, impacting countless industries, including automotive, computers, consumer electronics, IoT, and lighting.

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Award-Winning Controller + Antenna Extends Bluetooth Range To 900 Feet

McWong’s TruBlu Bluetooth mesh Fixture Controller with Long Range Antenna won two prestigious Innovation Awards at LightFair: The Technical Innovation Award and a Control Components & Hardware Category Award.

McWong’s TruBlu Bluetooth mesh Fixture Controller with Long Range Antenna won two prestigious Innovation Awards at LightFair: The Technical Innovation Award and a Control Components & Hardware Category Award.

The TruBlu Bluetooth mesh Fixture Controller with Long Range Antenna offers flexible and powerful networked lighting control outdoors. Since hardwiring is cost-prohibitive for outdoor applications, the introduction of a long-range (900ft) Bluetooth mesh wireless controller that can be integrated directly into a wide range of commercially-available fixtures enables more applications to utilize Bluetooth mesh. Together with features like continuous dimming, DLC certification, zone and luminaire level lighting control options, this controller enables cost-effective Bluetooth mesh control for outdoor lighting.

More information is available here.

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Product Monday: Toggled iQ – Networked Lighting Controls With Sophisticated Simplicity

At LightFair (LFI). David met with Dan Hollenkamp, COO of Toggled. Dan provided a product demonstration of their advanced, yet simple, wireless networked lighting control system, Toggled iQ.

While at LightFair (LFI), last month, I enjoyed a product demonstration from Dan Hollenkamp, COO of Toggled. The company is probably best known for its LED tubes (TLEDs) at Home Depot and other retailers. It was very interesting to learn about their advanced, yet simple, wireless networked lighting control system, Toggled iQ.

Here’s what I found interesting about it:

  • It’s based on a proprietary Bluetooth Mesh that allows up to 32,000 nodes on a network. That’s a lot of nodes!
  • They offer a sensor that detects motion, daylight, temperature, and humidity. It updates to the network every 5 minutes, and just two AA batteries can operate it for 10 years. That’s a long battery life and a nice bundle of four sensors in one. Image below.
  • Utilizing edge intelligence, the networked system distributes programming to wall controls, smart lamps, and luminaire controllers. If WiFi goes down in a building, disconnecting the system from the cloud / internet, each device will continue to operate normally, because they have stored their own instructions / programming within each device.
  • Smart TLEDs have light output sensors that alert the user to diminished output. The software can enable cost analysis between TLED replacement or increasing power to the smart lamp.
  • There is a plug load controller that can pair with the occupancy sensor to turn off plug load when a space is vacant.
  • At LFI, the company unveiled its Toggled iQ luminaire controller to give control over individual luminaires, connecting them with the Toggled iQ network lighting control system. The controller provides a dimming and color control interface between existing 0V to 10V dimmable luminaires and the Toggled iQ network lighting control platform. When paired with other Toggled iQ offerings (such as sensors, switches, and the free Toggled iQ app) the controller can enable daylight harvesting, occupancy/vacancy-based control, or schedule-based control, as well as customized lighting scenes, from an individual luminaire within the connected network. Image below.

Toggled’s parent company is Altair, a data analytic & AI platform company. It’s clear that Toggled’s significant move into networked lighting controls enables greater synergies between Toggled and Altair, with each leveraging the strengths of the other. More information about the Toggled iQ system is available here.

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John Arthur Wilson Interview: Better Bricks Wireless Lighting Controls Guide

David recently had the pleasure of interviewing John Arthur Wilson, a lighting control and utility rebate consultant, about his 2021 market research into wireless lighting controls. That research resulted in a learning guide that can be used to support basic education around wireless trends in lighting. The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) has published that document on their Better Bricks website, available to the public.

I had the pleasure of interviewing John Arthur Wilson, a lighting control and utility rebate consultant, about his 2021 market research into wireless lighting controls. That research resulted in a learning guide that can be used to support basic education around wireless trends in lighting. The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) has published that document on their Better Bricks website, available to the public, here

Shiller: The wireless control guide that you created for Better Bricks is a great document about wireless lighting controls. It provides a simple explanation of load control devices, the protocols, frequencies, performance, topologies, proprietary versus open, and more. Who was the primary audience for this guide?

Wilson: The guide was purposefully meant to target a broad audience set, and that was largely because it was something that we wanted to be really accessible. We didn’t want it to go overly in-depth in any one area to where you really needed to have a technical background. The idea was that this is something that could be leveraged either in training settings or to educate end users. So, the idea is that this guide is something that any organization across North America could pick up and could incorporate into any sort of workshop they’re doing. For example, if we’re working with electrical contractors or a utility with a strategic energy management program, and they’re working with facilities people or key decision makers. It was meant to be something that they could incorporate into their curriculum and leverage it.

There was a big body of research that informed why the guide was needed in the first place. Over a period of six months, we worked in-depth with over a dozen lighting control specifiers. We had electrical engineers, we had lighting designers, and we had contractors that design, build, and commission. We asked a lot of questions about project specifics to better understand the lighting control specifier and the customer. One of the things that came up repeatedly, was that luminaire level lighting controls (LLLC) has a massive “value engineering” problem, due to their higher costs. If you’re just looking at first costs upfront, people are saying this costs more, but there are so many other benefits. One of the major benefits is the wireless aspect. It streamlines installation. Some lighting specifiers and their clients are concerned about cybersecurity with wireless controls. We ask, is cybersecurity an issue on your jobs? And for most projects, it’s not. There’s a disconnect between how much we talk about cybersecurity as this generic boogeyman and then how much it’s actually an issue. But 80% of the actual cybersecurity risk isn’t wireless devices in the network system. They pose a tiny risk, but it’s nothing compared to the way your gateway is connected to the Internet and how you have established user access and password protection. That’s where the overwhelming majority of cybersecurity risk is.

As soon as you say no to wireless, you’re negating all the other wireless benefits. Wireless was a pinch point that we identified. In working with these specifiers, we realized there is typically an opportunity to educate the end user. We created the wireless guide to be an educational resource that could be part of that conversation when specifiers are talking to decision-makers.

Shiller: The wireless guide was published last year, right?

Wilson: The very end of last year.

Shiller: What’s been the overall response to the guide. Is NEEA happy with the clicks, downloads, and attention that it’s getting?

Wilson: Yes, I think they’re very happy with it. People love that even though it’s ten pages, it’s not dense. We kept it high level including a lot of graphics.

Shiller: After the basic education aspects of the guide, it dives into three major trends with wireless controls:  data resiliency, automatic device reconnection, and latency versus simultaneity. I was wondering if you wanted to talk a little bit to those three trends?

Wilson: Yes, I think of it as properly addressing past problems. They’re not wrong and they’re not imagining it. They’re right. Resiliency was a real issue. It is important to validate that. Wireless has gone from mostly reliable to resilient. There was an issue with devices that would fall offline, or just wouldn’t connect, and that was an issue. The biggest improvement here is the mesh network. You’re no longer reliant on an individual node, so that if something happens to that node, the message isn’t going to get passed. Another problem is that when people hear wireless, they almost always conflate it in their heads with Wi-Fi, which is just one type of wireless, but it’s not really the type that matters in commercial lighting. In fact, Wi-Fi plays a tiny part in commercial lighting networks, overall.

Shiller: What about automatic device reconnection?

Wilson: This one really matters. It was incredibly common and just so unbelievably frustrating when a device would invariably fall offline and then come back online. Now, these devices can come back online, they know who they are, they know who they’re supposed to be talking to, what they have received in between, because there’s timestamps. Before, people had to open the ceiling and press a button and put it back into discover mode, and then you have to reconnect it to the part of the network it was in, which was just awful. So, that was a major improvement.

Shiller: Great. And the third trend was latency versus simultaneity.

Wilson: Yes. Latency versus uniformity, simultaneity or whatever you want to call it. It drove my lighting designer friends up a wall. When you have a large space, and the scene command would get sent out, you’d get this ‘popcorning’ of lights changing at different times, throughout the space. This problem has been solved with time-synched commands, which is very cool. You can have a mesh network that sends this command out over a space, with a time signature stamp on it. Then when it gets to individual nodes that are controlling that, it sends the synchronized command out to all the rest of the devices so that everything happens uniformly. It is one of the major macro trends that I believe is a big step forward.

Shiller: What do you think are the most important takeaways from the guide, that you’d like specifiers to know? 

Wilson: I think the most important thing in the guide is that every single one of these issues doesn’t matter for every single job. Just focusing on wireless as the cause of cybersecurity risks does nothing to address the actual cybersecurity risks. The most important thing is it’s a tool kit to help specifiers understand the advantages of wireless, to help support a solution that is best for the client.

Shiller: Were there any topics left out of the guide in order to keep it short, manageable, and digestible? I’m curious if there are things you wished you could have fit in, but you couldn’t?

Wilson: We got all the major topics in it. There’s always a risk when you’re an inch deep and a mile wide that you’re not hitting the important details. We could really nerd out on this stuff, but those conversations don’t actually matter for decision-makers. There are always areas that we could have gone deeper on. And one, I wish we could have gone deeper on is open versus not open. The truth is we don’t have anything close to open in lighting, even though 98% of products on the market are based on open but have been tweaked to proprietary. And then the way that these companies talk about their systems being open is very misleading. Similarly, the way that they talk about if you need a gateway or not is very misleading. It’s like you don’t need a gateway for the most basic functionality, but if you want something like scheduling, you’re going to need a gateway. Rather than trying to answer all the issues through this guide, we set the table and then say, don’t be afraid to ask, what is this? How open is it, or is this a totally proprietary solution? Is this the solution in the middle where we still have an open API?

Shiller: John, I really appreciate you sharing your expertise with our readers. Thank you. The NEEA Better Bricks Wireless Lighting Controls Guide can be downloaded here.

edited July 18, 2022

 

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Research Indicates Individual Lighting Controls Can Improve Worker Productivity

Research conducted in 2020 indicates that the control of light impacts indoor environmental quality (IEQ)-productivity belief more than other IEQ control.

Research conducted in 2020 indicates that the control of light impacts indoor environmental quality (IEQ)-productivity belief more than other IEQ control.

Indoor environmental quality (IEQ) plays a key role in determining occupants’ productivity at work; however, analyses of the interconnected factors among building physical, attitudinal, social and demographic components in one study are lacking. To fill this research gap, this study investigated these interconnected factors’ influence on occupants’ IEQ-productivity belief, defined as a personal, subjective evaluation of the linkage between the impacts of five IEQ aspects (the quality of indoor temperature, air, natural and electric lighting, and acoustics) and productivity. A cross-sectional survey data was collected in university offices from six countries (Brazil, Italy, Poland, Switzerland, Taiwan and the U.S.). Results of multiple linear regression models indicate that IEQ satisfaction is the strongest positive predictor of the IEQ-productivity belief and this relationship is stronger in private offices. Country of residence is the second primary predictor. Several attitudinal-behavioral factors, including thermal comfort, perceived ease of controlling indoor environmental features, and attitudes toward sharing controls are all positively associated with IEQ-productivity belief. Interestingly, the level of control accessibility to light switches has the strongest impact as opposed to other controls. On the other hand, group norms and conformity intention are not significant predictors.

Regarding demographics, men are more likely than women to perceive the IEQs to have positive impacts on their productivity, without considering other variables in the regression model; however, women are more likely than men to consider all IEQs as having positive impacts on productivity, after considering other variables. These findings provide suggestions for prioritizing wellness in the workplace at the early design stage.

Read the full research article here.

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LLLC Shows Promise

My contribution to the May issue of tED Magazine evaluates luminaire-level lighting controls (LLLC) as a control solution and potential path for designing and installing networked lighting control systems.

Originally published in tED Magazine, the official publication of the NAED. Reprinted with permission.

Luminaire-level lighting control (LLLC) combines the energy code-mandated functions of occupancy and light sensing in an LED luminaire capable of operating autonomously using an onboard lighting controller. The latest generation of products adds a layer that enables programming and collection of useful occupancy and other data.

Typically installed in office buildings and schools, LLLC is also suitable for high-bay, parking garage, gas station, and other applications, particularly luminaires that are high wattage and have long operating hours and would therefore benefit most from enhanced energy savings. The Department of Energy estimated the installed base of networked luminaires will grow from less than one percent currently to nearly a third of all lighting by 2035.

“LLLCs combine LEDs, controls, connectivity, and data for a flexible lighting product that can improve occupant comfort and space utilization,” said Martin Mercier, Strategic Marketing Manager, Connected Systems, Cooper Lighting Solutions. “In the market, there is definitely a growing interest as these systems are getting easier to install, commission, and use.”

Defining LLLC

Image courtesy of Lutron Electronics

A basic LLLC solution starts with a luminaire fitted with LEDs connected to driver(s). A lighting controller is added as an integral component of the driver(s) or as a separate device that uses a relay to send dimming signals to them. The controller also features a microprocessor for programmed (or preprogrammed for “out of the box” energy code-compliant) operation, enabling the luminaire to operate autonomously. Finally, we have the input sensor(s), which may include an occupancy or vacancy sensor, light sensor (for daylight response), or a hybrid unit combining these functionalities. All control components are pre-installed in the luminaire.

As a subset of networked lighting control, a number of solutions incorporate radios for wireless communication between the luminaire and gateways or hubs and/or a central server that constitute the lighting network. If connected to a server, along with energy data, highly granular occupancy data can be collected for purposes such as optimizing space utilization. With Bluetooth or Wi-Fi connectivity, additional capabilities, such as asset tracking and contract tracing, can be implemented. Theoretically, other sensor types, such as air temperature sensors, can be incorporated, along with additional control strategies such as shade, plug load, and HVAC control.

Categorization

A 2021 Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) study categorized LLLC as one of three types of systems: Clever, Smart, and hybrid of the two.

Clever: These systems enact high-end trim, dimming, occupancy sensing, and light sensing. The luminaires install in a plug-and-play manner and require little or no additional programming.

Smart: These systems include capabilities of Clever systems but feature the ability to communicate and analyze energy and non-energy data for various uses such as space utilization, asset tracking, and more.

Clever-hybrid: These systems include a standalone gateway and provide additional capabilities such as monitoring but do not provide the full data collection and analysis capabilities of a Smart system.

Advantages and disadvantages

LLLC offers several advantages. Overall, by making each luminaire a control point, control is highly flexible, responsive, and therefore generally more energy-saving. According to the NEEA, average lighting energy savings with LLLC exceed 60 percent.

For the electrical contractor, LLLC can simplify wiring and reduce time installing discrete lighting control devices. For the electrical distributor, it offers an energy-saving, value-added solution that can streamline product schedules for lighting projects. The designer gains flexibility; the owner gains high energy savings, potentially data, and the ability to fine-tune and reconfigure the system with relative ease in the future; and users interact with a lighting system that respects comfort and offers personalization potential.

“Wireless systems and LLLC will continue to simplify lighting control design and specification because you don’t need to have all the project details upfront,” said Craig Casey, Building Science Leader, Lutron Electronics (Lutron.com). “Contractors don’t have to be worried about wired zones or zone configuration, just power to the fixture. Because of the tremendous opportunity for enhanced lighting performance, the lighting designer has a broader palette than ever and can enjoy greater freedom to design lighting that meets the individual needs of every job.”

“For electrical distributors, LLLCs provide an integrated option between the luminaire and controls, thus reducing the overall SKUs a distributor may need to onboard and simplifying the management of the flow of goods,” said Rahul Shira, Senior Product Marketing Manager, Signify (Signify.com). “In simple terms, by integrating the occupancy and daylight sensor into the luminaire, the SKU counts drop from three to one, significant savings.”

“Because these devices are typically installed by the fixture manufacturer, driver compatibility is resolved before the fixture is shipped,” Casey added. “Distributors don’t have to worry about compatibility and can be confident they are selling the contractor a system that will result in an easy installation and setup with limited callbacks.”

The primary inhibitors are the luminaire’s higher base cost, potential higher complexity of the project if a Smart system is deployed, insufficient value or savings for a given project, and uncertain owner interest in non-energy benefits generated by collecting data. According to the 2021 NEEA study, compared to a luminaire with no controls, the cost of LLLC in 2020 was estimated at an average $0.58/sq.ft. for Clever, $1.16/sq.ft. for Smart, and $0.78/sq.ft. for hybrid systems based on a prototypical 40,000-sq.ft. office building. NEEA noted, however, a significant decrease in costs from 2019 to 2020, suggesting these systems were becoming more competitive with a falling initial cost that can be further softened by rebates when applied in a retrofit.

“In retrofit projects, LLLCs unlock the path to claim higher rebates,” said Shira. “In most geographies, these rebates range from $15 to $65 per sensor integrated into an LED luminaire and are in addition to the rebates offered for installing LED lights. When coupled with the installation savings and deep energy savings offered by LLLCs, a return on investment of less than two years or even one year becomes very achievable.”

Image courtesy of Cooper Lighting Solutions

Taking advantage

“LLLC will grow in market penetration and evolve into more advanced solutions with more benefits beyond lighting, making it easier to break building system silos with open protocol,” Mercier said, advising distributors to get ahead of the curve by becoming familiar with the technology and products through education. “This already exists, but market penetration and functionalities will grow by large factors. It also leads to standardization, so more devices can interact as part of an IoT ecosystem—think temperature sensors for room HVAC control, Microsoft Office suite tools for hot desk booking, Parking Guidance System integration, wayfinding for warehouse lifts, and so on.”

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Verdantix 2022 Report, Green Quadrant: IoT Platforms for Smart Buildings

Enlighted, A Siemens Company has publicly released a partial version of Verdantix’s new whitepaper, Green Quadrant: IoT Platforms for Smart Buildings 2022.

Enlighted, A Siemens Company has publicly released a partial version of Verdantix’s new whitepaper, Green Quadrant: IoT Platforms for Smart Buildings 2022. This report provides a detailed, fact-based comparison of the 17 most prominent Internet of Things (IoT) platforms for smart buildings available on the market today. The analysis brings together information from extensive live product demonstrations with vendors, their responses to a 154-point questionnaire and insights from a survey of 285 real estate executives. The analysis finds that leading vendors have expanded their capabilities to deliver more comprehensive applications across areas such as asset monitoring and maintenance, energy management, space monitoring, and building security. The evaluation of capabilities and market momentum reveals that four firms — JCI, Schneider Electric, Siemens and Spacewell — currently lead the market, whilst other providers have strong capabilities in specific areas. Corporate real estate executives and technology buyers can use this report to understand the leading offerings in the market and the vendors that will best meet their needs.

Download the whitepaper here.

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