Author: David Shiller

Nuckolls Fund Distributes $130,500 In Grants For 2022

In March, The Nuckolls Fund announced its 2022 Fund recipients. A total of $130,500 was awarded for 2022.

In March, The Nuckolls Fund announced its 2022 Fund recipients. A total of $130,500 was awarded for 2022. Included in that total are three $30,000 Nuckolls Grants recipients to expand lighting criteria, one $7,500 Lesley Wheel Grant to develop a new curriculum, one $13,000 Edison Price Fellowship for a summer internship, and four $5000 Student Achievement Awards.

Nuckolls Fund 2022 Grant Summary

Nuckolls Fund – $30,000 each

  • University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, by Jake Tucci
  • School of Architecture and Design at Virginia Tech, by James Jones and Ron Gibbons
  • Mississippi State University, by Robin Carroll.

Lesley Wheel Grant – $7,500

  • Victoria McReyolds, Texas Tech.

Edison Price Fellowship – $13,000

  • Arpah Guha from Lawrence Technological University at the Light and Health Research Center at Mount Sinai

Student Achievement Awards – $5,000 each

  • Sachintha De Vas Gunawardena, Rensselaer Polytechnique
  • Wangyang Song, Pennsylvania State University
  • Makayla Thompson, University of Nebraska/Lincoln
  • Paola Kwan, University of Colorado/Boulder

Learn more at EdisonReport here.

 

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Product Monday: Luminis’s Lumiquad Columns & Bollards

I have to admit that I love the distinctive illuminated circle with the subtle “X” that are created by the Lumiquad LQ641 columns and Lumiquad LQ427 bollards, by Luminis, an Acuity Brand.

I have to admit that I love the distinctive illuminated circle with the subtle “X” that are created by the Lumiquad LQ641 columns and Lumiquad LQ427 bollards, by Luminis, an Acuity Brand. The sleek bollards and columns are ideal for retail, restaurant and office applications. These luminaires are dimmable and can be paired with a variety of sensors and controls.

All of these images are from the following project:

PROJECT NAME: Watersound Town Center

LOCATION: Panama City, Inlet Beach Ft Walton, Florida, USA

CATEGORY: Exterior Lighting

PROJECT COMPLETION: July 2021

ARCHITECT: WBA Architecture

CONTRACTOR: White Construction

LUMINIS AGENT: DesignLight

PHOTOGRAPHY: Chad Baumer

Check out the light pattern that the luminaires create individually and in groups, in the following images. More information is available here. 

 

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California Bill Would Ban Some Plastic & Styrofoam Packaging If Enacted

The American Lighting Association (ALA) has alerted its members to AB 2026, a bill addressing product packaging in California.

The American Lighting Association (ALA) has alerted its members to AB 2026, a bill addressing product packaging in California. The bill is making its way through the legislative process in the State Assembly. Among other things, the bill prohibits a manufacturer, retailer, producer, or other distributor that sells or offers for sale and ships purchased products in or into the state from using expanded or extruded polystyrene to package or transport the products.

In addition, AB 2026 would phase out the use of plastic films, cushioning and other plastic packaging materials in California. This mandate would require large retailers to meet this mandate by January 1, 2024 and small online retailers to do the same by January 1, 2026.

The legislation has broad support in Sacramento, but has impacted industries concerned about increased product damage during shipping. Read the latest version of the bill text.

 

 

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Distributors Report Infrastructure Law Funds Flowing

A recent survey by Electrical Wholesaling of the Top 150 electrical distributor chains, revealed that Infrastructure Law funds are beginning to be spent in the electrical market.

A recent survey by Electrical Wholesaling of the Top 150 electrical distributor chains, revealed that Infrastructure Law funds are beginning to be spent in the electrical market. The following percentage of responding distributors report that they see infrastructure law funds already flowing:

  • Expansion of high-speed broadband internet for underserved rural or urban areas: 12%
  • Electric utility grid expansion or retrofit: 6%
  • Electric vehicle charging stations: 14%
  • Expansion or retrofit of traditional infrastructure projects, including roads, bridges, rail, ports, and airports: 9%
  • Build, preserve and retrofit homes and commercial buildings: 8%
  • Modernize schools and child-care facilities: 11%
  • Upgrade veterans’ hospitals and federal buildings: 22%

The four bolded spending categories above will lead to more lighting sales. The EV charging spending is another reason multiple lighting manufacturers are jumping into the EV charger market.

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Lighting Industry Embraces EV Chargers

The lighting industry is embracing EV chargers at a remarkable rate, considering they aren’t a lighting product. We have curated some examples of manufacturers and an e-retailer entering the EV market.

The lighting industry is embracing EV chargers at a remarkable rate, considering they aren’t a lighting product.

Image courtesy of EspenEV.com

In a recent podcast, Electrical Wholesaler shared the following results of a survey of Top 150 electrical distributors and the interest they’re seeing in EV chargers from their electrical contractor customers. Note the gray bars, below, showing the percentage of contractors already installing each type of EV chargers:

 

I’ve collected examples, below, of manufacturers, and a lighting e-commerce leader jumping into the EV charger space:

  • Espen Technology is introducing a new line of EV chargers at LFI, next week. Their EV charger dedicated website is EspenEV.com

 

  • Light Efficient Design has a new line of EV Chargers branded as breezEV. Their dedicated EV charger website is https://breez-ev.com

  • Stresscrete offers a streetlight pole with a built-in EV charger, named VoltLock. More information here.

 

  • The online retailer Bulbs.com began selling EV chargers in May, 2022. More information here

 

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Product Monday: Sourcery Software Is Lighting Specifier Collaboration Platform

Sourcery is a social collaborative platform for design industry professionals to seamlessly collaborate with one another when specifying and procuring products in every phase of a project.

Sourcery is a social collaborative platform for design industry professionals to seamlessly collaborate with one another when specifying and procuring products in every phase of a project. The software makes the process of selecting and procuring products for commercial construction easier and more efficient. Sourcery uses modern cloud computing tools to create a single reference location with all information in one place.

The platform:

  • Increases Efficiency – Through maintained libraries and custom collections of products create curated categorized lists, assign to projects, and generate luminaire schedules in a few clicks.
  • Encourage Collaboration – Through a live luminaire schedule that will Revolutionize the process of specifying lighting products and collaborating during design.
  • Enhances Transparency – Through a project management companion to make the procurement process transparent throughout all stages of design, budgeting, bidding and construction.

Learn more here.

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Research Indicates Individual Lighting Controls Can Improve Worker Productivity

Research conducted in 2020 indicates that the control of light impacts indoor environmental quality (IEQ)-productivity belief more than other IEQ control.

Research conducted in 2020 indicates that the control of light impacts indoor environmental quality (IEQ)-productivity belief more than other IEQ control.

Indoor environmental quality (IEQ) plays a key role in determining occupants’ productivity at work; however, analyses of the interconnected factors among building physical, attitudinal, social and demographic components in one study are lacking. To fill this research gap, this study investigated these interconnected factors’ influence on occupants’ IEQ-productivity belief, defined as a personal, subjective evaluation of the linkage between the impacts of five IEQ aspects (the quality of indoor temperature, air, natural and electric lighting, and acoustics) and productivity. A cross-sectional survey data was collected in university offices from six countries (Brazil, Italy, Poland, Switzerland, Taiwan and the U.S.). Results of multiple linear regression models indicate that IEQ satisfaction is the strongest positive predictor of the IEQ-productivity belief and this relationship is stronger in private offices. Country of residence is the second primary predictor. Several attitudinal-behavioral factors, including thermal comfort, perceived ease of controlling indoor environmental features, and attitudes toward sharing controls are all positively associated with IEQ-productivity belief. Interestingly, the level of control accessibility to light switches has the strongest impact as opposed to other controls. On the other hand, group norms and conformity intention are not significant predictors.

Regarding demographics, men are more likely than women to perceive the IEQs to have positive impacts on their productivity, without considering other variables in the regression model; however, women are more likely than men to consider all IEQs as having positive impacts on productivity, after considering other variables. These findings provide suggestions for prioritizing wellness in the workplace at the early design stage.

Read the full research article here.

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DOE’s New GSL Definition Final Rule Now Regulates Many LED Lamps

While many in the lighting industry are aware that US DOE recently issued a Final Rule for a definition change of general service lamps (GSL) as well as General Service Incandescent Lamps (GSIL), many in the industry don’t realize the impact of this expanded GSL definition on many LED lamps. Most of the public discussion around the new GSL definition focused on the addition of incandescent and halogen specialty lamps to the regulated GSL category. However, the new expanded GSL definition encompasses many LED lamps, in addition to incandescent and halogen.

While many in the lighting industry are aware that US DOE recently issued a Final Rule for a definition change of general service lamps (GSL) as well as General Service Incandescent Lamps (GSIL), many in the industry don’t realize the impact of this expanded GSL definition on many LED lamps. Most of the public discussion around the new GSL definition focused on the addition of incandescent and halogen specialty lamps to the regulated GSL category. However, the new expanded GSL definition encompasses many LED lamps, in addition to incandescent and halogen.

This means that many LED A-lamps, LED specialty lamps, and LED tube lamps will now be regulated by the DOE, in less than two months. For LED lamp manufacturers, this means self-certifying the regulated models onto DOE’s database of regulated products, known as CCMS. This is a great deal of spreadsheet work, and will be most difficult for manufacturers that have no previous experience uploaded spreadsheets to CCMS. Well-placed sources tell me that DOE will take more than two months to create the forms for manufacturers to submit all of the new regulated lamp types, thereby giving manufacturers some much needed additional time for certification compliance. It’s unlikely that the new 45 lpW “backstop” Final Rule will create problems for any LED lamps, as most are significantly above the 45 lpW requirement for GSL.

What follows is the amended GSL definition, from the April, 2022 DOE GSL Final Rule:

“General service lamp means a lamp that has an ANSI base; is able to operate at a voltage of 12 volts or 24 volts, at or between 100 to 130 volts, at or between 220 to 240 volts, or at 277 volts for integrated lamps, or is able to operate at any voltage for non-integrated lamps; has an initial lumen output of greater than or equal to 310 lumens (or 232 lumens for modified spectrum general service incandescent lamps) and less than or equal to 3,300 lumens; is not a light fixture; is not an LED downlight retrofit kit; and is used in general lighting applications. General service lamps do not include:

(1) Appliance lamps;

(2) Black light lamps;

(3) Bug lamps;

(4) Colored lamps;

(5) G shape lamps with a diameter of 5 inches or more as defined in ANSI C79.1-2002;

(6) General service fluorescent lamps;

(7) High intensity discharge lamps;

(8) Infrared lamps;

(9) J, JC, JCD, JCS, JCV, JCX, JD, JS, and JT shape lamps that do not have Edison screw bases;

(10) Lamps that have a wedge base or prefocus base;

(11) Left-hand thread lamps;

(12) Marine lamps;

(13) Marine signal service lamps;

(14) Mine service lamps;

(15) MR shape lamps that have a first number symbol equal to 16 (diameter equal to 2 inches) as defined in ANSI C79.1-2002, operate at 12 volts, and have a lumen output greater than or equal to 800;

(16) Other fluorescent lamps;

(17) Plant light lamps;

(18) R20 short lamps;

(19) Reflector lamps that have a first number symbol less than 16 (diameter less than 2 inches) as defined in ANSI C79.1-2002 and that do not have E26/E24, E26d, E26/50×39, E26/53×39, E29/28, E29/53×39, E39, E39d, EP39, or EX39 bases;

(20) S shape or G shape lamps that have a first number symbol less than or equal to 12.5 (diameter less than or equal to 1.5625 inches) as defined in ANSI C79.1-2002;

(21) Sign service lamps;

(22) Silver bowl lamps;

(23) Showcase lamps;

(24) Specialty MR lamps;

(25) T shape lamps that have a first number symbol less than or equal to 8 (diameter less than or equal to 1 inch) as defined in ANSI C79.1-2002, nominal overall length less than 12 inches, and that are not compact fluorescent lamps;

(26) Traffic signal lamps.”

 

 

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Six Colliding Paradigms Converging on the Built Environment

An interesting article in Realcomm.com argues that there are six large paradigm shifts changing
the built environment. While the article discusses the impacts of each paradigm on commercial buildings (without addressing lighting), it’s interesting to imaging how the same six mega-trends could impact lighting.

An interesting article in Realcomm.com argues that there are six large paradigm shifts changing
the built environment.  The six major drivers of change are:

  1. Technological
  2. Financial
  3. Biological
  4. Climate
  5. Globalization
  6. Demographics

While the article discusses the impacts of each paradigm on commercial buildings (without addressing lighting), it’s interesting to imaging how the same six mega-trends could impact lighting. For example:

  1. Technological – Nanotech coatings to add new features to luminaire housings and light sources, AI in smart lighting, IoT lighting, 3D printed luminaires, display projectors in luminaires, and much more.
  2. Financial – The explosive growth of server farms and the specialized lighting that goes into them.
  3. Biological – The rapid growth in UV disinfection lighting to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. Other light & health areas, such as circadian lighting, and future light therapies for depression, migraines, and other common health problems.
  4. Climate – The growth in resilient lighting that can withstand natural & manmade disasters. This includes the recent publication of ANSI/IES LP-13-21 Introduction to Resilient Lighting Systems.
  5. Globalization – Current supply chain disruptions could accelerate re-shoring. The war in Ukraine is impacting the cost of metals and some other commodities. Could worsening relations between the US and China disrupt the lighting industry’s nearly complete reliance on Chinese manufacturing? Trump era tariffs got lighting manufactures looking seriously at Mexico, India, Taiwan, Vietnam, and other alternatives to Chinese sourcing.
  6. Demographics – Lighting for aging populations. Light & health (again). Further growth in the health care industry and all of the varied lighting applications specific to healthcare. Accelerated growth in e-commerce for lighting, to younger generations.

Read the full article here.

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Top 10 Trends In High Bay Retrofits For Warehouses & Production Facilities

A new white paper is titled The Top 10 Trends In High Bay Retrofits For Warehouses & Production Sites. The white paper was published by Lighting Expertise & Design Services (LEDS), a leading lighting retrofit firm in the United States, that specializes in lighting upgrades for warehouses and production sites.

A new white paper is titled The Top 10 Trends In High Bay Retrofits For Warehouses & Production Sites. The white paper was published by Lighting Expertise & Design Services (LEDS), a leading lighting retrofit firm in the United States, that specializes in lighting upgrades for warehouses and production sites.

The white paper goes into detail on these 10 trends:

  1. T5HO high bays have become a strong retrofit opportunity
  2. Linear integrated high bay fixtures outperform both TLED lamp retrofits, as well as round-UFO-HID form factor fixtures
  3. Controls & future-proofing
  4. CCT
  5. Rebates
  6. Facility managers are getting smarter at comparing retrofit proposals
  7. Consistency of installation quality
  8. Rising prices and supply chain disruptions
  9. Facility manager motivations are evolving
  10. Application matters

Access the full whitepaper here.

 

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