Category: LED + SSL

Product Monday: New Category Of LED Filament Lamps For HID Replacement

A new category of HID replacement lamps has arrived that are definitely not “corn cobs.” Their high lumen output LED filament lamps in traditional HID lamp form factors. I’ve found wattages as high as 42W (LED) that claim to replace up to 175W Metal Halide or HPS system watts (HID lamp + ballast), providing up to 75% energy savings.

A new category of HID replacement lamps has arrived that are definitely not “corn cobs.” Their high lumen output LED filament lamps in traditional HID lamp form factors. I’ve found wattages as high as 42W (LED) that claim to replace up to 175W Metal Halide or HPS system watts (HID lamp + ballast), providing up to 75% energy savings. All of the models that I’ve found are ballast-bypass, 120-277VAC input voltage, Type B. Some lamps are E26 and some are E39/EX39. Here are three early entrants into this new category:

LEDVANCE – Under its Sylvania brand, its ULTRA LED High Lumen Filament Lamps (image above) come in two 26W, ED28 shape models, one clear and one frosted, with a 300o light distribution/beam angle. They’re 153 lpW, phase-cut dimmable, 5000K (only), 4000 lumens, 5-year warranty (NLB Certified Warranty), 25,000 hours L70. More information here.

 

SATCO – Called Hi-Pro LED Filament Lamps, Satco’s are frosted only, claiming a full 360o beam angle and wet location listed (image directly below). Wattages up to 42W, producing 6000 lumens (143 lpW). More information here.

TCP – Their High Lumen LED Filament Lamps claim 200 lpW and 50,000 hour L70 (image directly below). TCP offers a 2200K CCT to resemble high pressure sodium lamps. Their 30W models in 4000K and 5000K are listed at 6000 lumens. They’re clear glass only, no frosted, in ED17, ED23, and ED28 shapes/sizes. More information here.

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Massachusetts LED Study Projects High C&I LED Adoption Rates

Last year, an evaluation report by DNV was published about Massachusetts’ commercial & industrial lighting rebate programs. The report projected some LED adoption rates significantly higher than DOE’s predictions for the US, as a whole.

Last year, an evaluation report by DNV was published about Massachusetts’ commercial & industrial lighting rebate programs. The report projected some LED adoption rates significantly higher than DOE’s predictions for the US, as a whole.

Key projections include:

  • Ambient linear LED adoption will reach 85% by 2024.
  • High/low bay LED adoption will reach 77% by the end of 2024.
  • Building exterior/outdoor LED adoption will reach 94% by 2024.

Read the full report here.

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LRC Proposes Two Metrics To Predict LED Product Life

Arguably, the biggest gap in LED metrics is a product lifetime metric and test procedure. Currently, the industry is rife with fraudulent emitter life claims used as LED system product life claims (lamps, luminaires, and engines).

Arguably, the biggest gap in LED metrics is a product lifetime metric and test procedure. Currently, the industry is rife with fraudulent emitter life claims used as LED system product life claims (lamps, luminaires, and engines). It is common to see LED product spec sheets with exaggerated L70 for the emitters (only), both violating of the TM-21 6X extrapolation rule, and being used as product lifetime claims.

Early last year, the Lighting Research Center (LRC) was approached by the International Energy Agency’s 4E Solid State Lighting Annex and asked to explore and summarize the literature on LED system lifetime. Over the course of a year, LRC conducted an international literature search that included definitions of LED life, failure mechanisms of LED components and systems, parameters that accelerate failure, and available test methods for estimating LED system lifetime. The results were accumulated into a report published in June by the IEA 4E SSL Annex, Literature Summary of Lifetime Testing of Light Emitting Diodes and LED Products, which is available online.

The major outcome of this report is the LRC’s recommendation of two test methods as the most promising for accurate life prediction of LED lighting products. The selection of these two methods was based on an understanding—from both the literature and from LRC’s own laboratory testing and research for the past two decades—of the ways in which LED systems fail and the operating conditions that lead to their failure. Here are the two proposed methods:

  • The first method, adopted recently by the European Union, considers both environmental condition and use pattern. This is an important advancement in the industry because it recognizes the effect of the operating conditions of LED products in different applications on lifetime. However, in its present form, this method only considers one temperature and use pattern condition and was implemented to report lumen depreciation and percentage of surviving products at the end of the test. Before this method can be used for predicting lifetime in different applications, other test conditions representative of those applications need to be added.
  • The second method was proposed by the Lighting Research Center and formalized by the Alliance for Solid-State Illumination Systems and Technologies (ASSIST). This method allows for any combination of environment temperature and use pattern to be specified, and thus provides a means to predict LED product lifetime within the boundary conditions of the test. One thing to note is that humidity is not considered in either of these test methods. Humidity was conveyed as a concerning factor in a number of studies discovered during our literature search. Considering the dominance of LED products for outdoor applications, such as for lighting parking lots, roadways, parks, airports and more, the effects of humidity should be weighed, especially where safety is concerned.

Read the full article in LD+A Online here.

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DOE Publishes Pair Of Reports About SSL Manufacturing And R&D Opportunities

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Office (BTO), within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), has published two new reports, 2022 DOE SSL Manufacturing Status & Opportunities and  Solid-State Lighting R&D Opportunities.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Office (BTO), within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), has published two new reports, 2022 DOE SSL Manufacturing Status & Opportunities and  Solid-State Lighting R&D Opportunities.

DOE 4

The SSL Manufacturing report examines high-priority opportunities to develop manufacturing technologies that will benefit energy-saving solid-state lighting (SSL) while also supporting an increased role in the global marketplace for U.S. manufacturing of lighting products.

The report looks at the LED chip, package, and luminaire markets and the OLED market, including production, supply chain, costs, pricing, and external influences. Characterization of the LED chip, package, and luminaire manufacturing process, equipment, and materials follows, with specific manufacturing opportunities called out. The final section looks at the OLED panel and luminaire industry with manufacturing opportunities pinpointed.

Download the full SSL Manufacturing Opportunities report here.

The SSL R&D Opportunity report examines the many critical opportunities that exist to positively impact energy savings, greenhouse gas emissions, human well-being, and the economy through research and development of light-emitting diode (LED)-based solid-state lighting (SSL). The document summarizes stakeholder input from DOE-hosted roundtable meetings, workshops, a Request for Information, and other sources.

Unlocking the next wave of advancements in SSL will require further breakthroughs in fundamental, early-stage R&D across the SSL value chain, as well as better understanding barriers to deployment for technologies with the highest decarbonization potential. This report provides detail on these advancements and the R&D necessary to make breakthroughs. Priority opportunity areas include:

  • Lighting Platform Technology R&D to support scientific, technological, integration, and manufacturing understanding and advancements of the LED technology platform that enable energy savings and support occupant health and productivity. Topics include material and device science, down-converter technology, diffuse light source materials and devices, optical delivery and control, power and functional electronics, advanced lighting concepts, and manufacturing technologies.
  • Lighting Science R&D to support research and understanding of fundamental lighting science and guide effective implementation of LED light source technology. Topics include lighting application efficiency (LAE) framework and human physiological impacts of light.
  • Lighting Integration and Validation to support field research to transition new lighting technology and understanding to practice and quantify the benefits. Topics include translating lighting research findings to practice and connected lighting with integrated controls and grid-interactive capabilities.

Download the full SSL R&D Opportunity report here.

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Researchers Discover New Way to Generate Light Through Use of Preexisting Defects in Semiconductor Materials

Researchers have discovered a new method of generating long-wavelength (red, orange, and yellow) light through the use of intrinsic defects in semiconducting materials, with potential applications as direct light emitters in commercial light sources and displays.

Researchers have discovered a new method of generating long-wavelength (red, orange, and yellow) light through the use of intrinsic defects in semiconducting materials, with potential applications as direct light emitters in commercial light sources and displays.

This technology would be an improvement on current methods, which use phosphors, for instance, to convert one color of light to another, according to the researchers, which include the Low Energy Electronic Systems (LEES) Interdisciplinary Research Group (IRG) at Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT’s research enterprise in Singapore, together with collaborators at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), National University of Singapore (NUS) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU).

A type of group-III element nitride-based light-emitting diode (LED), indium gallium nitride (InGaN) LEDs were first fabricated over two decades ago in the ’90s and have since evolved to become ever smaller while growing increasingly powerful, efficient, and durable. Today, InGaN LEDs can be found across a myriad of industrial and consumer use cases, including signals & optical communication and data storage, and are critical in high-demand consumer applications such as solid state lighting, television sets, laptops, mobile devices, augmented (AR) and virtual reality (VR) solutions.

Ever-growing demand for such electronic devices has driven over two decades of research into achieving higher optical output, reliability, longevity and versatility from semiconductors – leading to the need for LEDs that can emit different colors of light. Traditionally, InGaN material has been used in modern LEDs to generate purple and blue light, with aluminium gallium indium phosphide (AlGaInP) – a different type of semiconductor – used to generate red, orange, and yellow light. This is due to InGaN’s poor performance in the red and amber spectrum caused by a reduction in efficiency as a result of higher levels of indium required.

In addition, such InGaN LEDs with considerably high indium concentrations remain difficult to manufacture using conventional semiconductor structures. As such, the realization of fully solid-state white-light-emitting devices – which require all three primary colors of light – remains an unattained goal.

A new method of quantum dot fabrication has been demonstrated by making use of intrinsic defects in LED materials. Through the formation of pyramids, localized bright luminescence emanates from the pyramid apexes containing indium-rich quantum dots.

Addressing these challenges, SMART researchers have laid out their findings in a paper titled “Light-Emitting V-Pits: An Alternative Approach toward Luminescent Indium-Rich InGaN Quantum Dots”, recently published in the journal ACS Photonics. In their paper, the researchers describe a practical method to fabricate InGaN quantum dots with significantly higher indium concentration by making use of pre-existing defects in InGaN materials.

In this process, the coalescence of so-called V-pits, which result from naturally-existing dislocations in the material, directly forms indium-rich quantum dots, small islands of material that emit longer-wavelength light. By growing these structures on conventional silicon substrates, the need for patterning or unconventional substrates is further eliminated. The researchers also conducted high spatially-resolved compositional mapping of the InGaN quantum dots, providing the first visual confirmation of their morphology.

In addition to the formation of quantum dots, the nucleation of stacking faults – another intrinsic crystal defect – further contributes to emissions of longer wavelengths.

Jing-Yang Chung, SMART graduate student and lead author of the paper said, “For years, researchers in the field have attempted to tackle the various challenges presented by inherent defects in InGaN quantum well structures. In a novel approach, we instead engineered a nano-pit defect to achieve a platform for direct InGaN quantum dot growth. As a result, our work demonstrates the viability of using silicon substrates for new indium-rich structures, which along with addressing current challenges in the low efficiencies of long-wavelength InGaN light emitters, also alleviate the issue of expensive substrates.”

In this way, SMART’s discovery represents a significant step forward in overcoming InGaN’s reduced efficiency when producing red, orange and yellow light. In turn, this work could be instrumental in the future development of micro LED arrays consisting of a single material.

Dr Silvija Gradečak, co-author and Principal Investigator at LEES, added, “Our discovery also has implications for the environment. For instance, this breakthrough could lead to a more rapid phasing out of non-solid-state lighting sources – such as incandescent bulbs – and even the current phosphor-coated blue InGaN LEDs with a fully solid-state color-mixing solution, in turn leading to a significant reduction in global energy consumption.”

“Our work could also have broader implications for the semiconductor and electronics industry, as the new method described here follows standard industry manufacturing procedures and can be widely adopted and implemented at scale,” said SMART CEO and LEES Lead Principal Investigator Eugene Fitzgerald. “On a more macro level, apart from the potential ecological benefits that could result from InGaN-driven energy savings, our discovery will also contribute to the field’s continued research into and development of new efficient InGaN structures.”

The research is carried out by SMART and supported by the National Research Foundation (NRF) Singapore under its Campus for Research Excellence and Technological Enterprise (CREATE) programme. For this paper, the LED structures were grown using SMART’s unique facilities and know-how, structural studies were conducted at NUS using state-of-the-art, atomically-resolved electron microscopes, while nanoscale optical studies were conducted at MIT and NTU.

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Trusted Warranties

My contribution to the October issue of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR talks about LED product warranties and the National Lighting Bureau’s recently launched Trusted Warranty Program.

My contribution to the October issue of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR talks about LED product warranties and the National Lighting Bureau’s recently launched Trusted Warranty Program.

The program audits manufacturer warranties and rates them against public criteria, with high ratings earning a Trusted Warranty designation.

Criteria cover accessibility, internal support, clarity, relation of terms to reliability testing, warranty insurance based on length of warranty compared to years in business, and general responsiveness to claims.

This program has the potential to deliver significant benefits to the industry. Check out the article here.

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Ten Years of LED Rebates

While rebates for commercial lighting have been around since the 1980s, rebates for LEDs specifically didn’t see widespread acceptance until 2011. Now, 10 years later, we can take an in-depth look at LED rebates and the marketplace.

A big factor in getting LEDs to gain traction so quickly was the availability of rebates to help offset initial cost. While rebates for commercial lighting have been around since the 1980s, rebates for LEDs specifically didn’t see widespread acceptance until 2011.

Now, 10 years later, we can take an in-depth look at LED rebates and the marketplace.

Rebate fulfillment firm BriteSwitch analyzed how LED rebates have evolved over the years and took at look what’s next, here.

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Million LED Challenge in Full Swing

Are you aware of the Million LED Challenge in California? This program is a collaborative effort by the University of California, California State University, California Community Colleges, and the California State Department of General Services. It recently expanded to include options for converting linear fluorescent lighting to LED.

Are you aware of the Million LED Challenge in California? Launched in 2018, this program is a collaborative effort by the University of California, California State University, California Community Colleges, and the California State Department of General Services. Based on research, this program offers a simple, cost-effective way to replace traditional lighting with LED. The goal is to promote adoption of high-quality LED lighting in California government buildings, public universities and college campuses, and among public institution staff, students, faculty, and alumni.

In March 2021, the program announced it expanded options to include high-quality linear LED lamps, retrofit kits, and luminaires (as replacements for linear fluorescents) in addition to the A-lamps, PAR-lamps, and downlights previously available in the program.

Though most LEDs are superior in performance compared to fluorescents, choosing LED light sources can be challenging due to variances in color characteristics, controllability, and longevity. To help consumers navigate these options, the UC Davis California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) developed a Quality Specification for Linear LED Retrofit Solutions based on recently completed research.

Click here to learn more about the program.

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PNNL Estimates Energy Savings for Advanced LED Lighting

A study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates the energy savings opportunity associated with advanced lighting research conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) related to glare, flicker, color rendering, non-visual effects of lighting, and outdoor environmental effects of lighting.

A study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates the energy savings opportunity associated with advanced lighting research conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) related to glare, flicker, color rendering, non-visual effects of lighting, and outdoor environmental effects of lighting.

Part one of the study, conducted by Skumatz Economic Research Associates (SERA), was designed to estimate the buyer value of advanced lamps and luminaires. SERA’s research focused on three lighting product categories: commercial 4-foot linear LED luminaires, residential general service LED lamps, and street/roadway luminaires. These products were selected as representatives of the larger market sectors from which they were drawn (commercial, residential, and outdoor). Using descriptions of hypothetical future luminaires likely to result from PNNL research, SERA queried potential buyers of luminaires, asking for their views on the value of these luminaires. SERA then analyzed the responses using a purchase-price effects methodology, similar to that used by utility energy efficiency programs to estimate difficult-to-quantify non-energy benefits. Using this methodology, SERA estimated the value perceived by buyers of future products containing technologies or features likely to result from PNNL research.

Part two of the study, conducted by Guidehouse Consulting, applied the SERA estimates of value as inputs to the lighting market model used by DOE to estimate future energy savings from advanced lamps and luminaires. Developed by Guidehouse for the DOE Lighting R&D program, this model has been used by DOE for more than a decade to estimate the energy savings potential of LED technology. The model translated SERA’s findings into estimates of energy saving opportunity.

Key findings include:

• Advanced LED products added 334 tBtu of source energy savings to projected LED energy savings in 2035. That’s an additional 31 billion kWh of electricity saved in U.S. buildings in 2035, above and beyond what LEDs are already expected to provide, and equivalent to about 10% of total lighting energy use across commercial, outdoor, and residential sectors in the year 2035.
• Surveyed lighting users saw substantial value in the lighting improvements sought from planned research, with incremental long-term perceived values equivalent to 43 – 46% of the estimated baseline luminaire prices.

The findings also confirm that the methodology used holds promise for identifying energy-saving opportunities that may be difficult to quantify for advanced features.

To learn more, download the full report.

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2021 DOE/IES Lighting R&D Workshop Goes Virtual

Join the U.S. Department of Energy and the Illuminating Engineering Society at the 18th annual Lighting R&D Workshop, February 1–4, 2021, where top lighting scientists and industry thought leaders will gather to share progress, challenges, ideas, and solutions to shape the future of lighting. The 2021 workshop will be virtual and free to attend.

Join the U.S. Department of Energy and the Illuminating Engineering Society at the 18th annual Lighting R&D Workshop, February 1–4, 2021, where top lighting scientists and industry thought leaders will gather to share progress, challenges, ideas, and solutions to shape the future of lighting. The 2021 workshop will be virtual and free to attend.

The event will include interactive expert panel discussions to dissect complex scientific and technology issues; topic table sessions seeking input for future research planning; and a poster session showcasing top research by research organizations and students. (Students: Submit your abstract by December 4 for the Student Poster and Design Competition.)

Click here to learn more and register.

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