Category: Lighting Industry

GE Current Announces Plan to Acquire Hubbell Commercial and Industrial Lighting Business

GE Current, a Daintree company (Current) has announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement with Hubbell Incorporated to acquire Hubbell’s commercial and industrial (C&I) lighting business.

GE Current, a Daintree company (Current) has announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement with Hubbell Incorporated to acquire Hubbell’s commercial and industrial (C&I) lighting business.

Based in Greenville, SC, the Hubbell C&I lighting business is a major manufacturer of professional lighting, lighting controls, and connected lighting. The business offers a comprehensive range of indoor and outdoor lighting products for industrial, commercial, and institutional applications. The Hubbell C&I lighting business includes brands such as Area Architectural Lighting, Beacon, Litecontrol, Kim, Columbia, Prescolite, Alera, Dual-Lite, Compass, Hubbell Outdoor Lighting, and Hubbell Controls Solutions.

Together, the two businesses’ product and controls portfolios will be positioned to capture growth driven by continued conversion to LED and demand for connected light controls systems through the diversified go-to-market channels.

After closing, Current and the Hubbell C&I Lighting business will maintain separate agency networks with dedicated resources and distinct brands. Both businesses will be able to strengthen their respective portfolios through innovation, leveraging the best commercial tools for speed and driving efficiency through combined scale.

Closing is expected to take place in the first quarter of 2022 subject to regulatory approvals and other customary conditions.

Comments Off on GE Current Announces Plan to Acquire Hubbell Commercial and Industrial Lighting Business

NLB Program Identifies Trustworthy Warranties

My most recent contribution to ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR talks about the Trusted Warranty Evaluation Program, a program recently introduced by the National Lighting Bureau to provide greater confidence and transparency with LED product warranties.

My most recent contribution to ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR talks about the Trusted Warranty Evaluation Program, a program recently introduced by the National Lighting Bureau to provide greater confidence and transparency with LED product warranties.

The Trusted Warranty Evaluation Program is designed to audit manufacturer warranties and verify they satisfy certain public criteria. Warranties are evaluated using a system with a maximum score of 11, of which at least eight are required to achieve a trusted warranty certificate.

Click here to check it out.

Comments Off on NLB Program Identifies Trustworthy Warranties

LightFair Announces 2021 Pilot Mentorship Program Class

LightFair recently announced the 11 mentees in its first annual mentorship program, a six-month program which enables emerging lighting professionals to connect with experts in the industry to learn about lighting design and architecture.

LightFair recently announced the 11 mentees in its first annual mentorship program, a six-month program which enables emerging lighting professionals to connect with experts in the industry to learn about lighting design and architecture.

“LightFair’s Pilot Mentorship Program is expanding educational and networking resources past the trade show floor, providing access to up-and-coming professionals that help shape the future of the lighting industry,” said Dan Darby, show director. “Our 11 mentors, handpicked from IALD, IES and leading design firms, have been meeting with our mentees since April, giving them one-on-one direction. We are excited to see this program grow and benefit the future of lighting.”

The mentee Class of 2021, selected from a pool of qualified applicants on the LightFair website, includes: Daphne Agosin, MFA candidate for Lighting Design at Northwestern University; Tyler Dellea, assistant engineer at CHA; Mark Ekberg, project designer at Aurora; Elizabeth Kline, lighting designer at Shop12 Design; Justin Kobayashi, electrical engineer at Clark Nexen; Elaine Liang, lighting designer at WATT Lighting; Grace Mennell, junior lighting designer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art; LeeAnne Osborn, designer and deputy director of strategy at UNOLAI Lighting Design & Associates; Nathalie Quadrio, lighting designer trainee at Licht Kunst Licht; Ryan Seffinger, junior designer at Electrolight; and Nishat Tasnim, lighting designer at STANTEC.

Each of these 11 mentees were placed with one of LightFair’s expert mentors based on their area of learning interest. These mentors are: Lee Brandt, principal, HLB Lighting Design; Jessica Krometis, senior designer, Hartranft Lighting Design; Mark Loeffler, principal, Mark Loeffler Design Consulting, LLC; Caitlin Mulligan, specification sales manager of business development & key accounts, SCI Lighting Solutions; Giulio Pedota, partner, Schuler Shook Theatre Planners / Lighting Designers; Kathy Prysgoda, founding principal, Light Studio LA; Lisa Reed, founding principal, Envision Lighting Design; Daniel Salinas, president | lighting design systems designer, Salinas Lighting Consult; and Chrysanthi Stockwell, associate vice president, senior lighting designer and engineering market leader HGA.

Participants in the Pilot Mentorship Program can take part in LightFair’s Mentorship Panel, moderated by Sam Koerbel at The Designery on October 29 at 10:30 AM. Admission to the Mentorship Panel is granted with LightFair registration.

Click here to learn more about the program.

Comments Off on LightFair Announces 2021 Pilot Mentorship Program Class

IES to Host Webinar on Lighting Value August 12, 2021

The Illuminating Engineering Society will host a webinar, “Meeting the Moment: Lighting and Value,” on August 12, 2021 at 12:00 PM ET.

The Illuminating Engineering Society will host a webinar, “Meeting the Moment: Lighting and Value,” on August 12, 2021 at 12:00 PM ET.

Presented by Michael Myers, PNNL and Lisa Skumatz, SERA, the webinar is described:

Lighting provides value in spaces, allowing them to be functional while providing visual interest and making places more desirable. Lighting value is more than the return on investment of energy or maintenance, and this webinar will discuss new industry efforts and metrics for estimating difficult-to-quantify values related to lighting.

The webinar is valued at 1 CEU.

Click here to learn more and register.

Comments Off on IES to Host Webinar on Lighting Value August 12, 2021

IES Publishes COVID-19 Impact Survey

LD+A recently published an Illuminating Engineering Society survey about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lighting industry. The survey was conducted among the IES membership with 1,083 responses from across the industry.

LD+A recently published an Illuminating Engineering Society survey about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lighting industry. The survey was conducted among the IES membership with 1,083 responses from across the industry.

Many of the questions focused on how the pandemic changed work and anticipation of things returning to a semblance of normalcy.

My big three takeaways were:

  • The majority of respondents predicted the lighting industry returning to pre-COVID status either in the second half of 2021 (46%) or during 2022 (40%).
  • In terms of increasing demand, the three biggest winners in the next six months are predicted to be healthcare lighting, infrastructure, and smart/connected lighting.
  • 39% of respondents said it’s either “very likely” or “likely” UVC products will receive widespread adoption in the next six months.

Click here to check it out.

Comments Off on IES Publishes COVID-19 Impact Survey

A Look at the LED Product Manufacturing Supply Chain

Like many industries, the lighting supply chain is largely globalized. While this produces high volumes of LED products, it is vulnerable to macroeconomic shocks such as tariffs and the COVID pandemic. To better grasp these supply chain issues, it is worthwhile to understand how the lighting supply chain changed over the past decade.

Like many industries, the lighting supply chain is largely globalized. While this produces high volumes of LED products, it is vulnerable to macroeconomic shocks such as tariffs and the COVID pandemic. These disruptive events highlighted vulnerabilities for manufacturers.

In the lighting industry, shipping delays and component shortages of integrated circuit chips used for electronics, notably LED drivers, have extended lead times, affecting product availability. By the end of 2020, 11 percent of building contractors surveyed by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce for its Q42020 Commercial Construction Index reported shortages of electrical products other than copper wire, and 10 percent reported shortages of lighting products. Electrical and lighting products dropped out of the top three in the Q12021 report, but troubling signs remain.

During this period, a number of major U.S. LED product manufacturers announced price increases ranging from two to eight percent on LED luminaires and up to nine percent on LED drivers. They justified these increases by citing higher shipping costs, unstable logistics, raw material shortages, unfavorable exchange rates, and supplier price increases.

In the second quarter, the National Electrical Manufacturers Association’s (NEMA) Electroindustry Business Confidence Index was pegged at 65.4 in May, solidly in expansionary territory but a retreat of 24 points from April. Respondents largely cited labor and materials shortages and resulting inflationary pressures as restraining factors on growth. Comments about future conditions mirrored these concerns, while manufacturers were optimistic about demand continuing to improve.

To better grasp these supply chain issues, it is worthwhile to understand how the lighting supply chain changed over the past decade. In March 2021, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published 2020 LED Manufacturing Supply Chain, which characterized the global manufacturing supply chain for LEDs and LED products. The report looks at its economic impact in the United States, impact of macroeconomic shocks such as tariffs and the COVID pandemic, and opportunities for more domestic manufacturing.

The LED product manufacturing process starts with the LED die or chip, which is typically mounted in packages that include phosphor material for conversion of the LED emission into white light. The packages are then mounted on a printed circuit board for integration into a lamp or luminaire along with optics, heat sink, driver, any control devices such as sensors, and housing. A variety of materials is consumed in these processes. LED product manufacturing has become fairly diversified with specialist companies.

DOE found that LED die and package manufacturing is dominated by Asia as a low-cost manufacturing hub, with LED lamp manufacturing concentrated in China. LED luminaire manufacturing is geographically diversified; the United States is home to a large number of manufacturers. In 2019, the U.S. LED luminaire market was estimated at about $10.2 billion.

DOE evaluated a typical LED 2×4 troffer as a representative commercial luminaire and broke down its cost. As LED package costs have fallen considerably, DOE estimated it to be around five percent of the troffer’s total product cost in 2020, compared to 33 percent in 2014, with an extra 10 percent for the printed circuit board. The rest of the value is in the optics, driver, housing, etc.

DOE estimated overall that 75 percent of the value in an LED troffer is to the U.S. economy and 25 percent to foreign. Based on an average 25 percent markup due to value added from engineering, design, and shareholder profit, the value added to the U.S. economy increases to 89 percent. Analyzing each segment of the lighting supply chain and inherent demand in the U.S. market, DOE assessed that the LED luminaire market represents the biggest opportunity for domestic lighting manufacturing.

Two big macroeconomic events disrupted the supply chain in the past several years. In 2018 and 2019, Trump Administration tariffs on certain goods originating in the People’s Republic of China went into effect, including LED packages and LED luminaires. Generally, the 5-25 percent LED package cost increase was passed on to U.S. customers. To avoid the tariffs, some manufacturers of intermediate components such as light engines moved manufacturing from the U.S. to Mexico.

The second big event of course is the COVID pandemic, during the first 6-9 months of which manufacturers reported supply chain disruptions including shortages and delays, decline in sales and demand, and a mix of inventory shortages and surpluses. A swift, major impact was a shortage in LED packages, materials, and driver components resulting from manufacturing shutdowns in China, which affected the rest of the supply chain. As the pandemic proceeded, a significant drop in demand and attendant drop in sales steadily rose in importance.

DOE cited four major opportunities for LED luminaire domestic manufacturing in the U.S. moving forward. These are high-end LED luminaires, LED luminaires that require quick lead times while able to be maintained in relatively low inventories, niche-product products such as UV and humancentric lighting, and additive manufacturing (3D printing) or other manufacturing innovations. Of these, additive manufacturing offers dramatic potential to streamline the supply chain, though it is currently used primarily for prototyping due to cost and materials efficiency.

Download 2020 LED Manufacturing Supply Chain at https://bit.ly/2Sr5TeN.

Comments Off on A Look at the LED Product Manufacturing Supply Chain

DOE Studies LED Manufacturing Supply Chain in Report

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has published a new report that characterizes the global manufacturing supply chain for LEDs and LED lighting products. The report investigates the economic impacts of this supply chain on the United States and identifies opportunities for increased domestic manufacturing.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has published a report that characterizes the global manufacturing supply chain for LEDs and LED lighting products in 2020. The report investigates the economic impacts of this supply chain on the United States and identifies opportunities for increased domestic manufacturing.

The report details the manufacturing process for typical LED products, identifying what proportion of LED products are manufactured and assembled in the United States and internationally, and analyzes the value added for a typical LED luminaire manufactured in the United States versus internationally. The report also examines recent macroeconomic events that have impacted the global supply chain for LED products, including tariffs and the COVID-19 pandemic. The analysis uses international trade data, market reports, and interviews with LED die, package, and lamp/luminaire manufacturers.

The analysis reveals that manufacturing of LED die and packages is concentrated in Asia, while manufacturing of LED lamps is dominated by China. In contrast, LED luminaire manufacturing takes place worldwide, and 89% of the value added for a domestically manufactured LED luminaire can be attributed to the United States. Value added analysis is used to determine the effects of a globalized supply chain on technologically advanced products, such as LEDs and LED lighting, where the supply chain is widely distributed across companies, countries, and even continents. In 2019, the total size of the North American LED luminaire market was estimated to be $11.6 billion, of which the United States is the majority share.

The report considers how the LED supply chains have shifted over the last decade and seeks to define where the domestic manufacturing opportunities are found, from an economic and feasibility perspective. Onshore manufacturing during any stage of the LED supply chain could enable infrastructure development and provide long-term manufacturing jobs and benefits. Key opportunities for increased U.S. presence within the LED lighting supply chain include:

  • High-end LED luminaires, often with high variability in design, features, and customization
  • LED luminaires that require fast lead times while maintaining lower inventories
  • Niche market LED lighting products, such as UV and human-centric lighting
  • Using additive manufacturing and 3D printing techniques, developing tools and molds, designing architectural luminaires, and fabricating luminaire components with fewer process steps or more automation.

Click here to check out the report.

Comments Off on DOE Studies LED Manufacturing Supply Chain in Report

10% of Contractors Reported Lighting Product Shortage in Q42020

Component shortages, price increases, and shipping delays resulting from the COVID pandemic are disrupting the lighting supply chain.

Component shortages, price increases, and shipping delays resulting from the COVID pandemic are disrupting the lighting supply chain.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Q42020 Commercial Construction Index reported that 10% of surveyed contractors say they are experiencing shortages of lighting products, roughly tied with the same number reporting shortages of electrical products (11%). Check out the report here. This appeared to mitigate in Q12021, though issues persist.

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR covered the story here.

inside.Lighting has another take here.

Get the Department of Energy’s analysis of the LED manufacturing supply chain in 2020 here.

Comments Off on 10% of Contractors Reported Lighting Product Shortage in Q42020

Acuity Brands to Acquire OSRAM Digital Systems Business in North America

Acuity Brands, Inc. recently announced it has signed a definitive agreement to purchase ams OSRAM’s North American Digital Systems (DS) business. Acuity said it expects the transaction to close during the summer of 2021.

Acuity Brands, Inc. recently announced it has signed a definitive agreement to purchase ams OSRAM’s North American Digital Systems (DS) business. Acuity said it expects the transaction to close during the summer of 2021.

The ams OSRAM North American DS business develops and manufactures lighting components including LED drivers, LED light engines, electronic ballasts, and certain connected components. The ams OSRAM Digital Systems business is one of the largest LED lighting driver companies in North America. LED drivers are a crucial component of the vast majority of luminaires and enable embedded smart technologies to make lighting and controls more accessible and reliable. The acquisition of the ams OSRAM North American DS business and addition of their team of associates will expand Acuity’s capabilities and its advanced LED driver portfolio, which currently includes the eldoLED driver and IOTA emergency driver brands.

Acuity’s acquisition of ams OSRAM’s North American DS business includes approximately 1,100 associates in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. The transaction is subject to the satisfaction of certain customary closing conditions. Until close, the companies will continue to operate independently. The parties have agreed not to disclose financial details or other terms of the transaction.

Comments Off on Acuity Brands to Acquire OSRAM Digital Systems Business in North America

ALA Publishes Whitepaper on Socketed Vs Integrated Luminaires

The American Lighting Association recently published a whitepaper covering socketed versus integrated LED luminaires for residential and hospitality luminaire manufacturers.

The American Lighting Association recently published a whitepaper covering socketed versus integrated LED luminaires for residential and hospitality luminaire manufacturers.

Topics in the 18-page document include environmental factors, form factor, visual appeal, customer needs, performance, and price, all of which inform decision-making as to whether to build a socketed or integrated luminaire.

Click here to read it free.

1 Comment on ALA Publishes Whitepaper on Socketed Vs Integrated Luminaires

Type on the field below and hit Enter/Return to search