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Philips Introduces MASTER LED Bulbs Using LUXEON LEDs

Philips has announced its MASTER LED collection of LED lamps that can be used in luminaires with E27 and GU10 sockets. The 7W E27 A55 lamp, identical in form factor…

Philips has announced its MASTER LED collection of LED lamps that can be used in luminaires with E27 and GU10 sockets.

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The 7W E27 A55 lamp, identical in form factor to a conventional light bulb, is most interesting, suitable for retrofit of 40W incandescents for nearly 83% energy savings in general lighting applications. The lamp is available in CW (4200K, 70 CRI, 230 lumens) and WW (3100K, 85 CRI, 155 lumens) color. The lamp is predicted to provide an average service life of 45,000 hours. No word (as far as I could tell) on compatibility with dimmers.

The complete product line appears to be targeted to general and downlighting luminaires in hotels and hospitality applications, but Philips is also promoting them to offices and homes as well.

Recently, the MASTER LED Bulb was honored by both the Institute Francais du Design and Equip’Hotel Paris for its innovative design and sustainability.

Currently, the product is only available in 230V countries, but should be available in the U.S. and Canada within the first half of 2009.

Click here to learn more about this interesting product.

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Cooper Acquires Illumination Management Solutions

Cooper Industries has announced the acquisition of Irvine, CA-based Illumination Management Solutions, Inc. (IMS). IMS is a developer of specialized optics and system design for LED luminaires. Terms of the…

Cooper Industries has announced the acquisition of Irvine, CA-based Illumination Management Solutions, Inc. (IMS). IMS is a developer of specialized optics and system design for LED luminaires. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

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IMS designs and manufactures LED systems and luminaires for a variety of lighting applications and has developed an innovation called LightBAR(tm) technology, which allows for greatly extended design life and performance in roadway and infrastructure lighting as well as safety applications in oil and gas, emergency lighting and other industrial applications.

“The acquisition of IMS demonstrates Cooper’s ongoing strategic commitment to become a market leader in energy-efficient solid state lighting solutions,” said Cooper Industries’ Chairman and CEO Kirk S. Hachigian.

Cooper Industries’ Chairman and CEO Kirk S. Hachigian

Cooper Industries’ Chairman and CEO Kirk S. Hachigian

He adds: “LED technology is a key growth platform for Cooper having previously acquired io Lighting and UK-based Clarity Lighting. Cooper also continues to make organic investments in this key technology platform with the construction of our Cooper Lighting LED Innovation Center in Peachtree City, Georgia, which will act as a centralized resource for all global LED-based activities and will leverage technology from Cooper Crouse-Hinds, Cooper Safety as well as Cooper Lighting. The acquisition of IMS and the talent it brings into our organization strongly complements our technology investments by adding enhanced capabilities in LED-systems and optical design. As a result, Cooper will be able to bring more LED-based solutions to the market faster across our global portfolio and it better positions the company to meet the expected global demand for more energy-efficient solutions and infrastructure investment, including the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.”

These types of marriages make sense even in today’s economic climate. Many lighting companies still have strong balance sheets, which many LED companies are looking for, and LED companies offer access to innovative technology in a category that is expected to exhibit strong growth during the downturn.

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Lighting Controls Association’s Education Express Program Supports New California Lighting Controls Training and Certification Program

The Lighting Controls Association has announced that its Education Express online education system now supports lighting controls training and certification conducted by the California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP)….

The Lighting Controls Association has announced that its Education Express online education system now supports lighting controls training and certification conducted by the California Advanced Lighting Controls Training Program (CALCTP).

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CALCTP is a new program operated by representatives of the California Lighting Technology Center, California Energy Commission, California Community College system, investor-owned and municipal utilities, electrical contractors, electrical workers, and manufacturers of advanced, high-efficiency lighting and control systems.

“The mission of CALCTP is to make expeditious and significant gains in conserving energy used for lighting in California through the widespread deployment and effective long-term operation of advanced, high-efficiency lighting and control systems,” says Doug Avery, project manager for Southern California Edison, a supporter of CALCTP.

CALCTP will educate, train and certify electrical contractors, electricians and other interested parties in the best practices and most effective techniques to market, sell, finance, install, tune, commission and maintain advanced lighting control systems.

In support of CALCTP, several LCA Education Express online courses are now required as prerequisites before receiving live training by CALCTP. These include EE101: Introduction to Lighting Control, EE102: Switching Control, EE103: Fluorescent Dimming and EE201: Daylight Harvesting. Students may take these courses at any time, at their own pace, from anywhere, and for free; only a short registration is required. I am pleased to be the author of these courses for the Lighting Controls Association.

After taking a course, the student may complete an online multiple-choice comprehension test. Upon receiving a passing grade (>70%), the student receives education credit. All certificates available for the Education Express courses, totaling 150 CALCTP points, must be collected and presented to CALCTP as proof of attendance.

Since its launch in June 2006, Education Express has served more than 6,200 students, who have benefited from more than 23,500 completions of course modules and some 9,000 comprehension tests taken online, enabling them to earn education credit.

Click here for more information about Lighting Controls Association’s Education Express, including a complete course listing.

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A Closer Look at Our New National Energy Standard: Comparison of the 1999 and 2004 Versions of ASHRAE 90.1

In this post, I noted that ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 has been established by the Department of Energy as the commercial building reference standard for state building energy codes starting in…

In this post, I noted that ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 has been established by the Department of Energy as the commercial building reference standard for state building energy codes starting in 2010. Meanwhile, the stimulus package appears to be encouraging adoption of the latest version, which is 90.1-2007, as noted in this post.

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I promised a more in-depth comparison of the 1999 (current national energy standard) and the 2004 (new national energy standard starting December 30, 2010) versions of 90.1 in the earliest post, and you can find it here in a new whitepaper I have written for the Lighting Controls Association, published free on their website. LCA also offers a course on energy codes that includes all post-1989 versions of 90.1 in its Education Express program, available free here.

In a nutshell, the major differences are:

• Change to recognized methods for automatic lighting shutoff and new exceptions.

• Addition of occupancy sensor requirements for classrooms, meeting and lunch rooms.

• New exit sign wattage requirement.

• Complete replacement of interior lighting power density allowances.

• Revised exterior lighting power density allowances.

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Assistant Development Engineer Position Available at CLTC

The California Lighting Technology Center is currently posting an entry level position for an Assistant Development Engineer to manage energy-efficient lighting demonstration projects at sites throughout California, analyze demonstration locations…

The California Lighting Technology Center is currently posting an entry level position for an Assistant Development Engineer to manage energy-efficient lighting demonstration projects at sites throughout California, analyze demonstration locations to determine energy baselines, design and implement energy-saving alternatives, and monitor projects to determine savings.

A bachelor’s degree in engineering or construction management, or equivalent work experience in a related field is required.

Click here for more information about this opportunity or to apply for this posting.

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IESNYC Announces Winners for the 2009 “Audible Light” Student Design Competition

The NYC section of IES recently hosted the Ninth Annual Student Design Competition and Exhibition, March 4-5 at the Helen Mills Theater. Students of lighting, architecture, interior design, art, product…

The NYC section of IES recently hosted the Ninth Annual Student Design Competition and Exhibition, March 4-5 at the Helen Mills Theater.

Students of lighting, architecture, interior design, art, product design, photography and electrical engineering programs created three-dimensional work designed to conceptually convey a sensory perception of sound. The competition drew more than 55 submissions.

First Place Award of $3,000 cash and participation in a one-week lighting design workshop in Europe sponsored by PLDA (formerly the European Lighting Designers Association, or ELDA) was won by Hye Yeun Lee, an interior design student at Parsons, for “Subway Sound.” Inspired by her daily subway ride, where her favorite distraction en route is to “look at the beautiful lights,” her project captures the experience spatially, kinetically and visually. One can sense speeding through a tunnel with the movement of lights evoking the sounds of a screeching train. (Instructor: Randy Sabedra.)

Click here to see a YouTube video of the project.

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Second Place Award of $1500 went to Ching-Yu Lin, an MFA Lighting Design student at Parsons, for his “Hey! It’s a Party.” An interactive turntable design, it responds with light to touch while spinning records in luminous patterns that simulate and stimulate a sense of rhythm. (Instructor: Nelson Jenkins.)

Click here to see a YouTube video of the project.

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Third Place Award of $1000 was won by the team of Sukmo Koo, who studies Interactive Telecommunications at NYU, and Young Taek Oh, an Industrial Design student at Pratt Institute. Titled “Make It Rain-Rain Box,” their project mimics sound of raindrops on a roof with “drops” of light that are activated when one pushes a button. (Instructor: Karen Stone.)

Click here to see a YouTube video of the project.

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The Honorable Mention Award, consisting of a free trip to GE’s “Lighting Institute” at Nela Park, Cleveland, Ohio, was given to two MFA candidates in Lighting Design at Parsons School of Design; Kacie Stigliano was recognized for “Rhythms,” and Sungbin Ma for “The Sound of Glitz.” Instructor for both students: Nelson Jenkins.

Lead sponsor of the event: Bartco Lighting
Supporters: National Cathode and Professional Lighting Designer Association
Contributors: Acuity Brands, Electronic Theatre Controls (ETC), Elliptipar, Enterprise Lighting Sales, GE Lighting, LSI, Pyramid Lighting, Visa Lighting
Donators: Kurt Versen, Louis Poulsen, Lutron, Winona

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DOE to Present New LED Site Lighting Performance Spec

The Department of Energy has announced it will host a 90-minute live webcast on commercial building LED site lighting in parking lots, moderated by Linda Sandahl of the Pacific Northwest…

The Department of Energy has announced it will host a 90-minute live webcast on commercial building LED site lighting in parking lots, moderated by Linda Sandahl of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

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Eric Richman and Michael Myer from PNNL will supply an overview of a ew LED Site Lighting Performance Specification developed by DOE and the Commercial Building Energy Alliances. Ralph Williams of Walmart will talk about his company’s experience with LED site lighting at selected stores.

The webcast will begin at 1:00 PM EST and will include a 60-minute presentation followed by 30 minutes of live Q&A.

Click here to learn more or register for this free webcast.

Meanwhile, LEDs Magazine is putting on a free webcast the same day, March 26, at 11:00 AM Eastern. Sponsored by Intertek and SphereOptics, the webinar is on the topic of “LED Luminaire Photometry & Performance Testing.” It will focus on performance standards developed for testing LED products such as IES LM79: Approved Method for Electrical and Photometric Measurements of Solid-State Lighting Products and LM80: Approved Method for Measuring Lumen Maintenance of LED Light Sources.

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According to LEDs Magazine, “Other performance testing options will be discussed, including the two ENERGY STAR programs from the U.S. DOE and EPA; and environmental performance testing, e.g. exposing solid-state lighting to stresses that the product will operate under, such as temperature, humidity, dust, shock, etc.” The speakers are Todd Straka, Director, Lighting Services, Intertek, and Christopher Durell, Vice President Sales & Applications Engineering, Sphereoptics, LLC.

Click here to register for this free webcast.

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Syska Hennessy Illuminates San Diego Banner Art Display

Syska Hennessy Group, Inc. has completed a lighting design project to illuminate the new “Banner Art” display for the Port of San Diego. In 2006, the Port of San Diego…

Syska Hennessy Group, Inc. has completed a lighting design project to illuminate the new “Banner Art” display for the Port of San Diego.

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In 2006, the Port of San Diego commissioned artist John Banks to create a new sculpture for the Imperial Beach Art Walk at Beach Boulevard and Seacoast Drive, and Syska Hennessy Group was engaged to illuminate the sculpture to increase visibility and prominence in the evening.

Titled, “Banner Art”, this 20-ft. abstract steel sculpture consists of three equally spaced vertical steel poles (8-inch diameter) that rise to a height of over 20 ft. The upper part of each element is bent into different shaped wavy forms as if blowing in the wind, like banners. Viewed from any angle but one, the artwork looks entirely abstract; but when viewed from one particular spot (called the “sweet spot”) near the corner of Seacoast Avenue & Imperial Beach Boulevard (about 150 feet from the artwork) the piece clearly spells the word “ART” in bold capital letters.

Syska Hennessy Group’s lighting designers developed plans to light the project from the ground, as well as adjacent and surrounding palm trees to frame the piece. The team selected high-efficiency low-wattage metal halide luminaires to minimize energy consumption and maintenance.

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Daylight Savings Yields Surplus

If you’re like many people these days, you could use a laugh. The Onion provides with a short, funny article about daylight savings time. It’s not a light bulb joke,…

If you’re like many people these days, you could use a laugh. The Onion provides with a short, funny article about daylight savings time.

It’s not a light bulb joke, I promise.

Read it here.

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Load-shedding Ballasts Lighten the Load

I recently wrote an article for TED Magazine about load-shedding ballasts, available online here. A building’s demand for electric power is the sum of the power required to run its…

I recently wrote an article for TED Magazine about load-shedding ballasts, available online here.

Load-shedding ballasts were installed at the Spence School in New York City in a demonstration project funded by NYSERDA. The ballasts are linked to a building management system, allowing the school to reduce lighting energy consumption by 30 percent when desired. At the click of a button on a laptop or mobile phone, Spence School can temporarily reduce demand by 261 kW during emergency grid events. “The success of this project shows the huge potential of our new Demand Response Platform,” says Stephen Lynch, president of ACE Energy Company, Inc. “This technology will not only reduce Spence School’s energy cost but will also make the world a greener, more energy-smart place.” Photo courtesy of OSRAM SYLVANIA, Inc.

Load-shedding ballasts were installed at the Spence School in New York City in a demonstration project funded by NYSERDA. The ballasts are linked to a building management system, allowing the school to reduce lighting energy consumption by 30 percent when desired. At the click of a button on a laptop or mobile phone, Spence School can temporarily reduce demand by 261 kW during emergency grid events. “The success of this project shows the huge potential of our new Demand Response Platform,” says Stephen Lynch, president of ACE Energy Company, Inc. “This technology will not only reduce Spence School’s energy cost but will also make the world a greener, more energy-smart place.” Photo courtesy of OSRAM SYLVANIA, Inc.

A building’s demand for electric power is the sum of the power required to run its electrical equipment in operation at any given time. Demand rises and falls as equipment is turned on and off. Peak demand is the highest level of demand over a given period. It’s the most expensive power the utility must produce, and these high costs are passed along to customers. Demand charges can represent 25% of a commercial building’s electric energy costs.

To encourage its customers to reduce demand during peak demand periods, utilities, independent system operators (ISOs), and other power providers are offering demand-response programs that provide financial incentives to building owners who agree to curtail load on request—either at scheduled times or during an emergency.

Building owners can significantly reduce their electric utility costs, therefore, if they can curtail load on a schedule, in response to price signals, or on demand by a utility—a strategy called load shedding. When it comes to lighting, this means switching or dimming. To address this need, the major manufacturers have begun introducing load-shedding ballast products.

Load-shedding ballasts:

* Provide a way to reduce input power upon an external demand
* Can be instant-start or program-start
* Can be bi-level switching, bi-level dimming or continuous dimming

Dimming or switching/ Generally, dimming is preferable to switching in occupied spaces in which users perform stationary or critical tasks—i.e., where changes in light output should be unnoticeable to a high degree.

How low can light levels go before occupants object? In developing a prototype for load-shedding ballast technology subsequently commercialized by lamp and ballast maker OSRAM SYLVANIA, the Lighting Research Center studied the question and concluded that they could dim the lamps by as much as 40% for brief periods without upsetting 70% of the building’s occupants or hindering their productivity. LRC studies also showed that nine out of 10 occupants accepted the reduction when they were told that it was being done to reduce peak demand.

Solutions are generally classified as low voltage (respond to a control signal from low-voltage wiring) or line voltage (respond to a control signal from line-voltage wiring). Low-voltage solutions enable integration of the ballast with other control strategies such as daylighting control and scheduling. Line-voltage solutions are well suited for retrofit because no low-voltage wiring needs be installed, just a signal transmitter.

You can read the entire article here.

Here are a few additional notes not covered in the online article:

Low-voltage solutions, both analog and digital, include SYLVANIA’s QUICKTRONIC POWERSENSE ballasts (continuous dimming), GE’s UltraStart (continuous dimming) and UltraMax Load-Shedding Instant Start ballasts (bi-level or 0-10V dimming ballast, 1.18 to 0.71 ballast factor, a 40 percent reduction in both power and light output), Advance’s Mark 7 and ROVR ballasts (continuous dimming), and Universal’s SuperDim, DaliPro and AddressPro (continuous dimming) and Ballastar ballasts (step-switching and dimming).

Line-voltage solutions, ideal for retrofit, including Universal’s DemandFlex ballasts and Demand Control Lighting (DCL) control system (enabling individual circuit control so that the load on some circuits can be reduced further than on other circuits—or turned off), Advance’s Mark 10 ballasts (continuous dimming), GE’s UltraMax Bi-Level Switching or 0-10V Load Shed Instant Start ballasts (step-switching from 1.18 to 0.71 BF), and SYLVANIA’s PowerSHED ballast (step-dimming with a one-third reduction in power, operates with a control signal transmitter, located at the control panel, capable of serving hundreds of ballasts).

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