Category: Lighting Design

IES Publishes Technical Memorandum on the Use of Solid State Lighting in Sports Lighting Applications

This document is intended to be a supplement to IES RP-6-15, Recommended Practice for Sports and Recreational Area Lighting, presenting light sources that are relatively new to the lighting industry and are currently being used or considered for use in sports and recreational lighting applications.

Published by the Illuminating Engineering Society, this document is intended to be a supplement to IES RP-6-15, Recommended Practice for Sports and Recreational Area Lighting, presenting light sources that are relatively new to the lighting industry and are currently being used or considered for use in sports and recreational lighting applications.

Click here to get a copy.

Comments Off on IES Publishes Technical Memorandum on the Use of Solid State Lighting in Sports Lighting Applications

IES Announces 2018 Illumination Award Winners

The Illuminating Engineering Society recently announced a total of 14 projects receiving the highest honors at the 2018 IES Illumination Awards. More than 200 projects were recognized with Awards of Merit.

The Illuminating Engineering Society recently announced a total of 14 projects receiving the highest honors at the 2018 IES Illumination Awards. More than 200 projects were recognized with Awards of Merit.

Here are the winning projects:

AWARD OF DISTINCTION

Love Sculpture at Sakura Lake Sports Park, Weihai, China
Designers: Enlighten Projects, YD Illumination, cBright Lighting

AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

Museum of the Bible, Washington, D.C.
Designers: SmithGroupJJR



AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

Jacques Cartier Bridge, Montréal
Designers: Moment Factory, Réalisations, Ambiances Design Productions, ATOMIC3, Ombrages, Lucion Média and UDO Design

AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

Wilshire Grand Center, Los Angeles
Designers: StandardVision, Lighting Design Alliance

AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

Intelligent Streetlight, Lloydminster, Alberta, Canada
Designers: ATCO

CITATION FOR HUMAN CENTRIC ILLUMINATION IN A DAYLIGHT DEPRIVED SPACE

HSBC Cafeteria, Dusseldorf, Germany
Designers: Licht Kunst Licht AG

CITATION FOR CONTROLS

Hendrix Bridge, Zagreb, Croatia
Designers: Skira

CITATION FOR A UNIQUE DAYLIGHT DELIVERY SYSTEM

Tsu-City Industrial Sports Center “Saorina”, Tsu-City, Mie Prefecture, Japan
Designers: Nikken Sekkei, Ltd., Material House, Ltd.

For written descriptions, click here.

Comments Off on IES Announces 2018 Illumination Award Winners

NEMA Publishes Whitepaper About Outdoor Lighting and Human/Animal Factors

The Lighting Systems Division of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) recently published a white paper, “Outdoor Lighting and Human/Animal Factors: An Industry Evaluation,” available for download at the National Lighting Bureau.

The Lighting Systems Division of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) recently published a white paper, “Outdoor Lighting and Human/Animal Factors: An Industry Evaluation,” available for download at the National Lighting Bureau, here.

The paper examines issues that can result in compromised outdoor-lighting quality when color issues are misunderstood and, therefore, misapplied. “Some proposals oversimplify the ecological tradeoffs that are inherent with any proposal to limit outdoor lighting to a certain correlated color temperature (CCT),” the paper states. “Such recommendations do not recognize the inconsistencies of such a spectrum choice, for instance, that long wavelength ‘red’ light purportedly may disturb certain bird migrations while short wavelength (i.e., blue) light distracts sea turtles. How is such a trade-off to be reconciled between species? The topic of lighting color is complex and involves many factors beyond CCT. Thus, promoting specific CCTs to advance a particular outdoor lighting policy may have unintended consequences on overall lighting quality and other concerns of public policy such as safety and security.”

In fact, Division members believe that existing data are insufficient to recommend that outdoor-lighting systems be limited to any CCT. The conclude: “A careful balance of controlling light pollution, excessive lighting infringing on residential property, and energy use while addressing issues of visual acuity and safety/security requires consideration of not only the lighting equipment installed but also the design and layout of the lighting equipment on a site.”

Comments Off on NEMA Publishes Whitepaper About Outdoor Lighting and Human/Animal Factors

Lighting for Patient Rooms

One of my contributions to the August issue of tED Magazine is an application story about how to light patient rooms in healthcare buildings.

I contributed this application article to the August issue of tED Magazine, the official publication of the NAED. Reprinted with permission.

Americans receive healthcare in more than 10,000 inpatient healthcare buildings in the United States, representing about 2.4 billion sq.ft., according to the 2012 U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Study.

In these buildings, one of the most important spaces is the patient room, serving multiple functions related to both effective caregiving and patient recovery and comfort. Multiple studies demonstrated that well-designed rooms can increase patient satisfaction and reduce accidents, infection, stays, and pain medication, ideas that now drive mainstream patient room design.

This article introduces basic lighting design principles for patient rooms and then dives into new thinking such as circadian lighting. It is based on the Illuminating Engineering Society’s (IES) ANSI/IES RP-29-16, Lighting for Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities, and the Lighting Research Center’s Lighting Patterns for Healthy Buildings website.

Patient room lighting

Patient rooms are multifunctional spaces, including tasks ranging from sleep to cleaning, requiring a flexible lighting design. The first step is to divide the room into zones, typically patient, caregiver, and family. To serve these zones, the lighting system should be layered to provide ambient, accent, and task (exam) lighting. To address variation of lighting needs in each zone, these layers should be separately controlled, with further zoning based on need. Dimming or multilevel controls are recommended, with the patient having control of patient zone lighting from the bed. All controls should have proper indicators or otherwise be properly labeled.

Higher light levels are appropriate during the day than at night. Daylight is highly desirable. In multi-patient rooms, the designer must provide dedicated lighting to each patient, noting ceiling curtain tracks that may divide the room. At night, night lighting should be provided allowing safe travel to the bathroom, while sufficient light should be provided for caregivers. At night, caregiver light levels can be lower than during the day, as their eyes are considered adapted for lower light levels. Still, it can be challenging to design illumination that both facilitates sleep and staff work.

Generally, designers should put comfort first by avoiding sources of direct and reflected glare on room surfaces, TV screens, and personal electronic devices. Overall, the design should facilitate relaxation, while giving the patient as much control over their environment as possible. In some cases, a residential touch such as wall sconces can make patients feel more at home.

In the patient zone, lighting should be provided with an understanding many patients spend much of their time lying on a bed reading or watching TV, with the most critically ill sometimes having only the ceiling above as their view. Patient ambient lighting may be controlled at both the entrance and patient controls, such as a pillow speaker handheld and integrated bed control. Similarly, the patient will be given a personally controllable reading light. Patient examination is often illuminated by downlights with control conveniently accessed by the caregiver.

The above recommendations are for general patient room lighting. Note there are many specialized room types, such as airborne-infection isolation rooms, protective environment (PE) rooms, critical care, obstetrical care, nursery, neonatal intensive-care, pediatric, geriatric extended-stay, and psychiatric rooms. Each will have particular lighting needs. In pediatric patient rooms, for example, the finishes are often more colorful and playful, and family members typically remain with the patient throughout their stay. Consult IES-RP-29-16 for more information about lighting design considerations for these spaces.

Circadian lighting

The relationship between light and circadian response is becoming increasingly understood, resulting in new design considerations. These considerations are particularly important in healthcare environments, where facilitating healthy sleep is important. In its recommended practice for healthcare lighting design, the IES states, “Increasingly, facilities recognize the need for 24-hour circadian rhythm-supportive lighting schemes.”

The key factors in circadian entrainment are intensity (amount of light falling on eye’s photoreceptors, requiring vertical lighting), spectrum (wavelength of the light, commonly associated with correlated color temperature), timing (when light falls on the eye), and duration (the cumulative amount of light exposure during the day).
The Lighting Research Center (LRC) has conducted a significant amount of research in this area and produced a metric and recommendations. The metric is circadian stimulus, or CS, with 0.1 being the threshold for circadian response and 0.7 being the saturation point, and with 0.3+ recommended for at least one hour in the early part of the day. The recommendations can be found at LightingPatternsforHealthyBuildings.org.

In patient rooms, LRC recommends a high CS during the day and a low CS in the evening. As an example, in a single-patient room, one option is to install recessed linear luminaires, a wall-mounted direct/indirect task light over the bed, a few downlights at the entrance and perimeter, and a recessed linear wallwasher, with all luminaires fitted with LED sources.

During the day, the linear light, task light, and wallwasher dim over the course of the day until reaching 25 percent of full output in the evening. The downlights remain at full output during most of the day until dimming to 50 percent in the evening. All lighting adjusts from 5000K in the morning to 3000K midday and 3500K in the late afternoon and evening. Alternately, the wallwasher could tune to a saturated blue light. LRC calculated that this design would provide a stimulating 0.3 CS in the morning, adjust to 0.2 midday, and decline to 0.1 in the late afternoon and evening.

Patient room lighting

Patient rooms are a highly sensitive application demanding extraordinary functionality, comfort, and flexibility. As such, lighting designs must accommodate these customer demands. For help, some manufacturers produce specialized product lines around healthcare environments and offer deep application expertise.

Hunterdon Healthcare Cardiac Expansion, designed by Nadaskay Kopelson Architects. Photo by Halkin|Mason Photography. Image courtesy of Visa Lighting.

Below is a dual-occupancy patient room lighted for optimal circadian entrainment in the morning (top), afternoon (middle), and evening (bottom). Image courtesy of the Lighting Research Center.

1 Comment on Lighting for Patient Rooms

Retrofits: Good, Better, Best

In a recent newsletter, the Northwest Lighting Network published a table suggesting good, better, best approaches to common lighting retrofits: 4-lamp troffer, 4-lamp strip, and HID luminaire.

In a recent newsletter, the Northwest Lighting Network published a table suggesting good, better, best approaches to common lighting retrofits: 4-lamp troffer, 4-lamp strip, and HID luminaire.

Check it out below:

Comments Off on Retrofits: Good, Better, Best

Fine-Tuning the Characterization of Color Rendition with Chroma Shift and Gamut Shape

To help the lighting industry develop and implement new color-rendering methods and metrics that address the shortcomings of the commonly used CRI metric, the U.S. Department of Energy conducts research to enhance understanding of color rendition. An article based on this research, “Chroma Shift and Gamut Shape: Going Beyond Average Color Fidelity and Gamut Area,” was recently published in the journal LEUKOS.

To help the lighting industry develop and implement new color-rendering methods and metrics that address the shortcomings of the commonly used CRI metric, the U.S. Department of Energy conducts research to enhance understanding of color rendition. An article based on this research, “Chroma Shift and Gamut Shape: Going Beyond Average Color Fidelity and Gamut Area,” was recently published in the journal LEUKOS.

The article discusses two concepts in color rendition–gamut shape and chroma shift–recently formalized in IES TM-30-15, Method for Evaluating Light Source Color Rendition. It discusses the calculation methods for these evaluation tools, how to interpret the values, and the ways in which these tools provide far more information about color rendition than average measures.

Click here to read the article.

Comments Off on Fine-Tuning the Characterization of Color Rendition with Chroma Shift and Gamut Shape

Lights of the Round Webinar: The Players in Lighting Specifications

In this video presentation created as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Indispensable Lighting Series, a group of industry leaders discussed the lighting design process, how best to improve the process, how best to interact with the other trades, and other pertinent lighting industry topics. Click to check out the archived presentation.

In this video presentation created as part of the Illuminating Engineering Society’s Indispensable Lighting Series, a group of industry leaders discussed the lighting design process, how best to improve the process, how best to interact with the other trades, and other pertinent lighting industry topics.

This two-part 2.5 hour presentation was co-produced by the IES, AIA, and the IALD.

Check out the archived presentation here.

Comments Off on Lights of the Round Webinar: The Players in Lighting Specifications

Library Stack Lighting 101

This article describes considerations and techniques for designing book stack lighting, based on the Illuminating Engineering Society’s (IES) RP-4-13, Recommended Practice for Library Lighting.

Below is an application story I contributed to the February issue of tED Magazine. Reprinted with permission.

According to the American Library Association, there are nearly 120,000 libraries in the United States, including school (82 percent), public (8 percent), and other (10 percent) libraries. These buildings feature a variety of spaces and tasks as use of their use has changed. Today’s libraries offer books and artifacts, digital content, computer and Internet access, wireless communications, and a place to meet. A variety of spaces impose common and particular lighting requirements, including entrances, lobbies, retail, office, display, services, multipurpose rooms, and exterior areas.

As library usage shifts to e-books, Internet, and digital content, there is less demand for publicly accessible storage areas. Nonetheless, the most popular type of space remains storage of book collections, called the library or book stack. In typical school and public libraries, this storage takes up 30 to 50 percent of usable floorspace, even more in other library types.

This article describes considerations and techniques for designing book stack lighting, based on the Illuminating Engineering Society’s (IES) RP-4-13, Recommended Practice for Library Lighting.

The library stack

A library stack is a collection storage as opposed to a reading area. In these areas, books are typically stored in shelving units that are often 3 feet wide, 1 foot deep, and 3 to 7.5 feet tall, according to IES. These shelving units connect to form ranges, separated by aisles that are at least 3 feet wide for browsing and 44 inches wide for major circulation and egress paths.

Typically, shelving is vertical, though angled shelves, carrousels, bins, and drawers may be in use for special materials and presentation of books. For older or lesser-used materials storage, high-density storage systems such as rolling stack shelving may be used, in which shelving units rest adjoined and are separated via a floor or ceiling rail using a manual or mechanical method. If rare books and artifacts are stored, these materials may be sensitive to ultraviolet energy and heat produced by electric light and daylight sources, and therefore may need to be isolated.

Image courtesy of Eaton Corporation.

Lighting considerations

In the stack area, the two primary tasks are reading covers and spines on the shelves, requiring vertical illumination from as tall as 90 inches to as low as six inches off the floor; and reading selected materials, requiring horizontal illumination. IES recommends a minimum of about 10 to 40 footcandles of horizontal illumination on the floor and an average of about 15 to 60 footcandles 2.5 feet above the finished floor. IES further recommends about an average 10 to 40 footcandles of vertical illumination on the front face of the shelving 2.5 feet above the finished floor, with a minimum of about half that near the bottom of the shelving. The most desirable light level within these ranges depends on the predominant ages of users, as older people need more light. Regardless, the average-to-minimum vertical and horizontal light level uniformity should be at a 2:1 ratio. High-density book shelving and periodical shelving have similar light level recommendations; consult IES-RP-4-13 to learn more. For high-density book shelving, vacancy sensors can be used to reduce light levels (and save energy) during periods of vacancy during operating hours.

Book spines are typically darker color, resulting in IES estimating an overall reflectance in the aisle of 30 percent or less. As darker materials absorb light, this means a significant amount of light may be absorbed between the top and the bottom of the shelf. Some books are protected by glossy plastic covers, which reflect light and may create a veiling reflection (reflected light that obscures seeing the task) depending on the viewing angle.

Lighting design options

One of the most informative features of IES-RP-4-13 is a stack lighting matrix, which describes lighting design options based on ceiling and shelving height, along with advantages, disadvantages, and design considerations for each.

The options for lower ceiling heights (14 ft.), IES identifies two options, either shelving-mounted direct/indirect or a combination of shelving-mounted direct with ceiling-mounted direct or indirect luminaires.

Image courtesy of Eaton Corporation.

Below, three options for 9- to 14-foot ceilings are summarized:

• Suitable for 3- to 7.5-foot-tall shelving, suspended direct/indirect luminaires, mounted perpendicular to the shelving units, can provide good vertical lighting in the aisles while producing ambient room lighting. Lighting uniformity is improved, and luminaire spacing can be maximized. However, installing these luminaires in continuous rows may result in relatively high lighting power. The direct light component may be shielded to reduce direct glare, while wide direct distribution will improve light level uniformity.
• Suitable for 3- to 7.5-foot-tall shelving, suspended indirect luminaires, mounted perpendicular or parallel to the shelving, can eliminate glare while producing soft ambient lighting. However, as with direct/indirect, mounting in continuous rows may result in higher lighting power. This option is well suited when flexibility is required for future reconfiguration of the shelving layout, or when a reading zone is integrated into the stack area. The luminaires should be mounted as low as possible to maximize the uniformity of illumination on the ceiling and shelves.
• Suitable for 5.5- to 7.5-foot-tall shelving, direct/indirect luminaires mounted on the shelving can provide good vertical lighting in the aisles while eliminating dark areas and producing ambient room lighting. Locating continuous rows on each side of the range may demand more lighting power, and additional lighting may be needed in circulation aisles. Electrical distribution must be provided from the floor to the lighting, which requires coordination and may limit shelving placement.

As with any other lighting application, finding the right stack lighting option requires careful matching to the project characteristics and goals.

Library lighting

Libraries may be changing with the times, but their core role in communities remains the same—providing centers for arts, learning, community-building, and imagination. Using recommended practice, distributors can support their customers in recommending appropriate solutions for their projects.

2 Comments on Library Stack Lighting 101

Masters of Light: Bruce Kirk on How to Light a House of Worship

In “How to Light a Place of Worship,” Bruce Kirk, Light Perceptions talks about about how to balance modern technique and tradition in the lighting of a house of worship.

Episodes of the UK’s LIGHTING Magazine’s “Masters of Light” webcast series are now available for on-demand viewing. In this series, lighting designers, artists and architects talk about their work, methods and philosophy in one-hour retrospectives hosted by the magazine’s editors.

In “How to Light a Place of Worship,” Bruce Kirk, Light Perceptions talks about about how to balance modern technique and tradition in the lighting of a house of worship.

Click here to check it out. Registration required.

Comments Off on Masters of Light: Bruce Kirk on How to Light a House of Worship

Masters of Light: Paul Boken on How to Light a Bridge

In “How to Light a Bridge,” Paul Boken, Mulvey & Banani Lighting discusses the various choices made when lighting a bridge, an ideal canvas for light.

Episodes of the UK’s LIGHTING Magazine’s “Masters of Light” webcast series are now available for on-demand viewing. In this series, lighting designers, artists and architects talk about their work, methods and philosophy in one-hour retrospectives hosted by the magazine’s editors.

In “How to Light a Bridge,” Paul Boken, Mulvey & Banani Lighting discusses the various choices made when lighting a bridge, an ideal canvas for light.

Click here to check it out. Registration required.

Comments Off on Masters of Light: Paul Boken on How to Light a Bridge

Type on the field below and hit Enter/Return to search