Author: Craig DiLouie

Registration Opens for 2022 LEDucation Trade Show and Conference

Registration for LEDucation 2022 Trade Show and Conference, being held March 15–16, 2022 at the New York Hilton Midtown, is now open.

Registration for LEDucation 2022 Trade Show and Conference, being held March 15–16, 2022 at the New York Hilton Midtown, is now open.

A premier trade show and conference for the New York lighting industry, LEDucation 2022 has more than 350 companies confirmed to exhibit and a slate of accredited educational programs. The 2022 Conference will open with six virtual sessions on Monday, March 14. In-person sessions will take place on-site Tuesday and Wednesday, March 15–16.

The health of lighting industry stakeholders is LEDucation’s top priority. LEDucation has added additional exhibit space to provide a more comfortable environment for exhibitors and attendees to network and navigate through. The Rhinelander area on the second floor of the New York Hilton Midtown will be added in 2022, along with Americas Hall 2, which was planned in 2020. This is in addition to the original two exhibit halls—the Grand Ballroom and Americas Hall I.

In compliance with New York City COVID-19 ordinance, expect that both masks and proof of vaccination will be required. Event Safety Protocols can be found here.

Exhibition Show Hours
Tuesday, March 15, 2022:   10:00am – 7:00pm
Wednesday, March 16, 2022:   9:00am – 3:00pm

2022 Conference Schedule
Virtual Sessions – Monday, March 14:   9:00am – 5:30pm EDT
In-Person – Tuesday, March 15:  9:00am – 5:00pm
In-Person – Wednesday, March 16:   9:00am – 4:30pm

For Registration Details, visit leducation.org/registration.

For Sessions Schedule, visit leducation.org/2022-sessions.

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Cooper’s Eric Jerger Talks Field-Adjustable Luminaires

I recently had the opportunity to interview Eric Jerger, VP and GM, Indoor Lighting, Cooper Lighting Solutions, for an article I’m writing for tED Magazine’s March 2022 issue. The topic? Field-adjustable luminaires.

I recently had the opportunity to interview Eric Jerger, VP and GM, Indoor Lighting, Cooper Lighting Solutions, for an article I’m writing for tED Magazine’s March 2022 issue. The topic: field-adjustable luminaires. Transcript follows.

DiLouie: How would you define a field-adjustable luminaire?

Jerger: A field-adjustable luminaire allows users and installers the ability to choose from a range of color temperatures and/or lumens with a simple switch on the product.

DiLouie: How would you characterize demand for field-adjustable luminaires, and would you consider this category a trend?

Jerger: The demand for field-adjustable luminaires continues to grow as distributors are maximizing limited warehouse space. Field-selectable luminaires offer multiple products in one, saving distributors money by stocking less inventory while still being able to meet the needs of the customers.

DiLouie: How does the field adjustable mechanism work, who does it, and how can it be changed in the future after installation?

Jerger: Field-selectable color temperature and lumens can be controlled with a flip of simple switch that is located on the luminaire. The switch can be adjusted during installation or after installation by any customer at any time to set the color temperature and/or lumens to their desired preference.

DiLouie: What adjustability is most popular? Lumens/Wattage, CCT, light distribution, or some combination of these?

Jerger: In the lighting industry, customers prefer to have the ability to change color temperature and lumens as these luminaire attributes can lead to desirable benefits such as increased productivity, enhanced mood, and alertness, as well as improved health and well-being. Customer preference for selectable lumens or selectable color temperature or both depends on the application.  For example in Industrial applications, customers typically only need selectable lumens from their high bay fixtures.

DiLouie: What lighting products are covered in this category? Troffers, downlights…? Is it only indoor, or are there outdoor products with this capability as well?

Jerger: Field-selectable color temperature and lumens are features that spans across multiple product categories in the lighting industry and will only continue to grow in the future. Recessed downlights, undercabinet fixtures, troffers, linear lighting, and even high bays are some examples of indoor solutions.

Indoor has been the predominant space for field-selectable products, however this emerging trend is also being requested by customers in outdoor products including residential floodlights, wall packs and canopy lighting luminaires.

DiLouie: What are the benefits of field-adjustable luminaires for electrical contractors?

Jerger: For contractors, the benefits of field-selectable products include being able to create the most optimal space for the customer during installation, as they will be able to choose with the customer their ideal LED color temperature and lumen output. In addition, the contractor knows they have installed a low maintenance product that will likely not require them to return to the job site. Also, for the contractor, field-selectable products make their jobs easier by not having to carry multiple variations of products.

DiLouie: For the contractor and owner, what are typical and ideal applications? Is there a “killer app” for this product?

Jerger: Field-selectable products can be used everywhere. Whether it’s a residential homeowner or a schoolteacher in an education environment or a facility manager in a warehouse, field-selectable products are simple for contractors to install while providing long-lasting benefits in a multitude of applications.

We’re not aware of a “killer app” for field-selectable products.

For residential applications, Cooper Lighting Solutions does have a HALO Home mobile app that is user-friendly and lets homeowners easily control their home’s lighting from anywhere in the world.

For commercial applications, Cooper Lighting Solutions does have a WaveLinx mobile app that allows the user to control color temperature and lumens.

DiLouie: Looking more closely regarding what’s in it for distributors, what types and level of cost and inventory savings can be realized, and what additional value can they offer to customers?

Jerger: With field selectable products, distributors are able to optimize their inventory, increase their turns, and likely provide better service to their customers. Cost and inventory savings would depend on the exact use case.

DiLouie: As typically these luminaires impose a cost premium, they have to justify additional value. Under what application situations would they not prove desirable?

Jerger: Examples would be projects where the lighting fixtures are highly specified to have a specific lumen and/or color temperature and thus the designer never intended for them to be changed.

DiLouie: What do you see as the future of this category in 3-5 years? Do you believe it will grow to mainstream adoption, or do you see it growing to serve a specific market willing to pay for the additional flexibility?

Jerger: We believe that in the next 3 to 5 years there will be an increase in customer adoption of field-selectable products, which will have growing applicability in a multitude of vertical applications.

DiLouie: If you could tell the entire electrical industry just one thing about field-adjustable luminaires, what would it be?

Jerger: Field-selectable technology empowers users to adapt to the every-changing needs of a space, creating the most optimal lighting experience at any time.

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IES Announces Call for Speakers for the 2022 Street & Area Lighting Conference

The Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) has announced a call for speaker proposals for the 2022 IES Street & Area Lighting Conference (SALC), which will be held October 10-13, 2022 at the Hyatt Regency Dallas in Dallas, TX.

The Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) has announced a call for speaker proposals for the 2022 IES Street & Area Lighting Conference (SALC), which will be held October 10-13, 2022 at the Hyatt Regency Dallas in Dallas, TX.

Seminar sessions generally run 25-35 minutes. The Street & Area Lighting conference is an educational conference and presentations must follow IES non-commercial policy.

The SALC planning committee will review all topics for consideration for the 2022 Conference in late winter. Speakers will be notified of acceptance for the conference program by early spring, and if accepted, final presentations will be due by summer 2022.

The IES Street & Area Lighting Conference appeals to a broad spectrum of attendees with a primary focus of improving outdoor lighting and related technologies. The IES SALC is the only forum specific to the interests and challenges facing outdoor lighting professionals.

The deadline for submissions is January 23, 2022 and will not be extended.

Click here to submit a proposal.

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Product Monday: Vertical Cylinders by Juno

Juno Lighting’s Trac-Master LED Vertical Cylinder Series offers a fresh take on a traditional aesthetic while providing strong performance up to 5,500 lumens.

Juno Lighting’s Trac-Master LED Vertical Cylinder Series offers a fresh take on a traditional aesthetic while providing strong performance up to 5,500 lumens.

The cylinders feature a side-mounted vertical driver and adjustable head capable of 360° rotation and 90° vertical aiming. A variety of accessory optics and light control accessories are also available, which offer the ability to customize beam patterns and lighting effects to enhance a lighting design.

Click here to learn more.

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Lighting Solution Development Enters Agreement to Acquire LightNOW

I have some big news to share today. Lighting Solution Development, a consulting firm specializing in the lighting industry, has entered into an agreement with my company to acquire LightNOW.

I have some big news to share today. Lighting Solution Development, a consulting firm specializing in the lighting industry, has entered into an agreement with my company to acquire LightNOW. The acquisition is expected to complete in January 2022, subject to closing conditions.

Lighting Solution Development is a consulting firm providing a broad range of business development, consulting, and recruiting services to help lighting businesses grow and become more profitable. It is headed by David Shiller, a lighting industry veteran, insider, and expert.

Under the terms of the deal, I was invited and was happy to accept remaining a contributor to LightNOW, supporting the new editorial team headed by Suelynn Shiller, COO at Lighting Solution Development.

For 20 years, LightNOW has served as an important voice and news source in a rapidly changing industry. I have absolute confidence that David and Suelynn will not only continue LightNOW’s excellent editorial tradition but take it to the next level with fresh insight and energy, making it even more relevant and useful for lighting practitioners both in the United States and abroad.

Starting in 2022, the editorial and advertising contact for LightNOW will be Suelynn Shiller at suelynn@lightingosld.com.

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Collisions of Light Produce Matter/Antimatter

Scientists studying particle collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)—a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science user facility for nuclear physics research at DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory—have produced definitive evidence for two physics phenomena predicted more than 80 years ago. The primary finding is that pairs of electrons and positrons—particles of matter and antimatter—can be created directly by colliding very energetic photons, which are quantum “packets” of light.

Scientists studying particle collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)—a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science user facility for nuclear physics research at DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory—have produced definitive evidence for two physics phenomena predicted more than 80 years ago. The primary finding is that pairs of electrons and positrons—particles of matter and antimatter—can be created directly by colliding very energetic photons, which are quantum “packets” of light.

This conversion of energetic light into matter is a direct consequence of Einstein’s famous E=mc2 equation, which states that energy and matter (or mass) are interchangeable. Nuclear reactions in the sun and at nuclear power plants regularly convert matter into energy. Now scientists have converted light energy directly into matter in a single step.

The second result shows that the path of light traveling through a magnetic field in a vacuum bends differently depending on how that light is polarized. Such polarization-dependent deflection (known as birefringence) occurs when light travels through certain materials. (This effect is similar to the way wavelength-dependent deflection splits white light into rainbows.) But this is the first demonstration of polarization-dependent light-bending in a vacuum.

The results were derived from a detailed analysis of more than 6,000 pairs of electrons and positrons produced in glancing particle collisions at RHIC and are published in Physical Review Letters.  Both results depend on the ability of RHIC’s STAR detector—the Solenoid Tracker at RHIC—to measure the angular distribution of particles produced in glancing collisions of gold ions moving at nearly the speed of light.

Colliding clouds of photons

Such capabilities didn’t exist when physicists Gregory Breit and John A. Wheeler first described the hypothetical possibility of colliding light particles to create pairs of electrons and their antimatter counterparts, known as positrons, in 1934.

“In their paper, Breit and Wheeler already realized this is almost impossible to do,” said Brookhaven Lab physicist Zhangbu Xu, a member of RHIC’s STAR Collaboration. “Lasers didn’t even exist yet! But Breit and Wheeler proposed an alternative: accelerating heavy ions. And their alternative is exactly what we are doing at RHIC.”

An ion is essentially a naked atom, stripped of its electrons. A gold ion, with 79 protons, carries a powerful positive charge. Accelerating such a charged heavy ion to very high speeds generates a powerful magnetic field that spirals around the speeding particle as it travels—like current flowing through a wire.

“If the speed is high enough, the strength of the circular magnetic field can be equal to the strength of the perpendicular electric field,” Xu said. And that arrangement of perpendicular electric and magnetic fields of equal strength is exactly what a photon is—a quantized “particle” of light. “So, when the ions are moving close to the speed of light, there are a bunch of photons surrounding the gold nucleus, traveling with it like a cloud.”

At RHIC, scientists accelerate gold ions to 99.995% of the speed of light in two accelerator rings.

“We have two clouds of photons moving in opposite directions with enough energy and intensity that when the two ions graze past each other without colliding, those photon fields can interact,” Xu said.

STAR physicists tracked the interactions and looked for the predicted electron-positron pairs.

But such particle pairs can be created by a range of processes at RHIC, including through “virtual” photons, a state of photon that exists briefly and carries an effective mass. To be sure the matter-antimatter pairs were coming from real photons, scientists have to demonstrate that the contribution of “virtual” photons does not change the outcome of the experiment.

To do that, the STAR scientists analyzed the angular distribution patterns of each electron relative to its partner positron. These patterns differ for pairs produced by real photon interactions versus virtual photons.

“We also measured all the energy, mass distributions, and quantum numbers of the systems. They are consistent with theory calculations for what would happen with real photons,” said Daniel Brandenburg, a Goldhaber Fellow at Brookhaven Lab, who analyzed the STAR data on this discovery.

Other scientists have tried to create electron-positron pairs from collisions of light using powerful lasers—focused beams of intense light. But the individual photons within those intense beams don’t have enough energy yet, Brandenburg said.

One experiment at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in 1997 succeeded by using a nonlinear process. Scientists there first had to boost the energy of the photons in one laser beam by colliding it with a powerful electron beam. Collisions of the boosted photons with multiple photons simultaneously in an enormous electromagnetic field created by another laser produced matter and antimatter.

“Our results provide clear evidence of direct, one-step creation of matter-antimatter pairs from collisions of light as originally predicted by Breit and Wheeler,” Brandenburg said. “Thanks to RHIC’s high-energy heavy ion beam and the STAR detector’s large acceptance and precision measurements, we are able to analyze all the kinematic distributions with high statistics to determine that the experimental results are indeed consistent with real photon collisions.”

Bending light in a vacuum

STAR’s ability to measure the tiny deflections of electrons and positrons produced almost back-to-back in these events also gave the physicists a way to study how light particles interact with the powerful magnetic fields generated by the accelerated ions.

“The cloud of photons surrounding the gold ions in one of RHIC’s beams is shooting into the strong circular magnetic field produced by the accelerated ions in the other gold beam,” said Chi Yang, a long-time STAR collaborator from Shandong University who spent his entire career studying electron-positron pairs produced from various processes at RHIC. “Looking at the distribution of particles that come out tells us how polarized light interacts with the magnetic field.”

Werner Heisenberg and Hans Heinrich Euler in 1936, and John Toll in the 1950s, predicted that a vacuum of empty space could be polarized by a powerful magnetic field and that such a polarized vacuum should deflect the paths of photons depending on photon polarization. Toll, in his thesis, also detailed how light absorption by a magnetic field depends on polarization and its connection to the refractive index of light in a vacuum. This polarization-dependent deflection, or birefringence, has been observed in many types of crystals. There was also a recent report of the light coming from a neutron star bending this way, presumably because of its interactions with the star’s magnetic field. But no Earth-based experiment has detected birefringence in a vacuum.

At RHIC, the scientists measured how the polarization of the light affected whether the light was “absorbed” by the magnetic field.

This is similar to the way polarized sunglasses block certain rays from passing through if they don’t match the polarization of the lenses, Yang explained. In the case of the sunglasses, in addition to seeing less light get through, you could, in principle, measure an increase in the temperature of the lens material as it absorbs the energy of the blocked light. At RHIC, the absorbed light energy is what creates the electron-positron pairs.

“When we look at the products produced by photon-photon interactions at RHIC, we see that the angular distribution of the products depends on the angle of the polarization of the light. This indicates that the absorption (or passing) of light depends on its polarization,” Yang said.

This is the first Earth-based experimental observation that polarization affects the interactions of light with the magnetic field in the vacuum—the vacuum birefringence predicted in 1936.

“Both of these findings build on predictions made by some of the great physicists in the early 20th century,” said Frank Geurts, a professor at Rice University, whose team built and operated the state-of-the-art “Time-of-Flight” detector components of STAR that were necessary for this measurement. “They are based on fundamental measurements made possible only recently with the technologies and analysis techniques we have developed at RHIC.”

Additional contributors to the analyses that led to these results include STAR co-spokesperson Lijuan Ruan of Brookhaven, Shuai Yang of Rice University, Janet Seger of Creighton University, and Wangmei Zha of the University of Science and Technology of China. The scientists made use of computational resources at Brookhaven’s Scientific Data and Computing Center, the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the Open Science Grid consortium.

Brookhaven Lab’s role in the work and operations at RHIC are supported by the DOE Office of Science (NP). Additional funders include the U.S. National Science Foundation and a range of international agencies listed in the published paper.

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New Lighting Agent Organization Launches

Today, the American Association of Independent Lighting Agents (AAILA) announced the official launch of www.lightingagents.org and invited independent lighting and controls agencies and their partnering manufacturers to join as Founding Members.

Today, the American Association of Independent Lighting Agents (AAILA) announced the official launch of www.lightingagents.org and invited independent lighting and controls agencies and their partnering manufacturers to join as Founding Members.

Founding Members who join in 2021 with the code EARLY will enjoy discounted dues in 2022 and 2023.

CM Buck & Associates, an independent lighting agency in Indiana, and Ascenti Lighting, a custom manufacturer in California, were the first agent and manufacturer members respectively.

The new organization is actively planning two events in 2022:

• the first annual AAILA Principals Meeting for leaders of member agencies and manufacturers on March 14, 2022 at LEDucation in New York City; and
• a full membership networking event in Las Vegas on June 20, 2022 before LightFair.

In addition to the events and creating an industry standard agency agreement for use by members, AAILA’s 2022 online training modules will include current lighting industry topics presented from a non-proprietary but sales-oriented perspective like “Selling Dark Skies” as well as a “Lighting Agent 101” series for people new to the industry.

Click here to learn more.

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IES Illumination Awards Submissions to Open January 4, 2022

The Illuminating Engineering Society has announced submissions for its 2022 Illumination Awards program will open January 4, 2022.

The Illuminating Engineering Society has announced submissions for its 2022 Illumination Awards program will open January 4, 2022.

Any innovative and compelling permanent lighting design installation completed within the previous 24 months is eligible. All (except manufacturers and IES staff and board of directors) are welcome to submit.

Different areas of the same project may be submitted as separate lighting or controls project entries. Each of these entries must have its own distinguishable title and additional entry fee. Each of these entries will be judged separately.

For the submittal, a 300-word project narrative, 10-images, and 1-video upload are permissible.

Learn more:

Submission Tutorial

2022 Program Calendar

Previous Awarded Projects

FAQs

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Product Monday: Pendants by Prudential

Prudential Lighting’s Gaze is a series of narrow profile (2.25” or 2.5” height) pendants designed with a distinctively curved soft edge with a subtle regress or a clean hard edge, round and square. Mix with Gaze acoustics for improved sound absorption.

Prudential Lighting’s Gaze is a series of narrow profile (2.25” or 2.5” height) pendants designed with a distinctively curved soft edge with a subtle regress or a clean hard edge, round and square. Mix with Gaze acoustics for improved sound absorption.

Here are the details:

• 18˝ – 24˝ – 36˝ Round and Square, Soft and Hard Edge
• Up to 115 LPW, 15000 delivered lumens (36˝)
• Cable mount, power over aircraft cable option (no cord)
• Flush or ½˝ surface standoff ceiling/wall mount with optional top glow
• 18 premium paint colors, no set-up fees, no time delays (in-house powder coating)
• 20 acoustic colors
• Made in America

Click here to learn more.

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LED Outdoor Lighting Matures

Application efficiency, visual comfort, color, control, and optical control are all key considerations when selecting a quality outdoor lighting solution today for new construction and upgrade projects. While this has certainly increased complexity, it has also enhanced opportunity for electrical professionals willing to invest in knowledge and stay on top of what’s new.

Below is my contribution to the December 2021 issue of tED Magazine, the official publication of the NAED. Reprinted with permission.

Outdoor lighting has evolved dramatically in the last 20 years. Today’s commercial outdoor area lighting must do a lot more lifting beyond its traditional role of providing illumination for nighttime safety and security and turning On and Off with the sun’s cycle or a time switch.

Application efficiency, visual comfort, color, control, and optical control are all key considerations when selecting a quality outdoor lighting solution today for new construction and upgrade projects. While this has certainly increased complexity, it has also enhanced opportunity for electrical distributors willing to invest in knowledge and stay on top of what’s new.

“Commercial outdoor lighting is a strong market,” said Erik Milz, VP, Product Management, Cree Lighting (CreeLighting.com). “Businesses continue to convert to LED lighting from old technologies that burned money. The LED lighting industry is also now mature enough that we’re starting to see early adopters to LED lighting begin to enter the replacement cycle. Add to that pent-up demand from the pandemic, and overall demand is strong.”

He added that the market currently faces some serious challenges, however. Supply chain bottlenecks, shortages of raw materials and components, supplier cost increases, and the impact of the pandemic on employees and customers are all combining to make it a tougher market.

Travis Bouck, Business Leader, Outdoor Lighting, Cooper Lighting Solutions (CooperLighting.com), said the market itself is undergoing change affecting need for outdoor lighting. “At a high level, we are seeing a move towards deurbanization and an increase in the use of outdoor spaces, which is driving activity outside of city centers and accelerating a long-term trend toward walkable communities and more outdoor lighting and working, in general,” he said. “This trend is visible in the residential market, of course, followed closely by retail, grocery, and other supporting sectors.”

He added he anticipates growth in demand for lighting products that comply with the Buy American Act and Trade Agreements Act, given the likelihood of increasing government spending on infrastructure projects.

In this article, we’ll look at the key design and technological trends shaping demand for outdoor lighting.

Image courtesy of Cooper Lighting Solutions.

Lighting trends

A number of trends are affecting this lighting category, culminating in a luminaire that is energy-efficient; non-glaring; emits light only where, when, and in the quantity needed; is aesthetically pleasing with a minimal visual footprint; and minimally impacts the environment. Other potential emerging and future trends include programmable light output and color to reduce inventory, more compact and lightweight luminaires, solar power options, potential to use poles for services such as charging and Wi-Fi in a smart city setup, and greater controllability and integration.

Topping the list is lighting performance, the primary job; energy, the primary restriction; and finding the right balance between the two.

While LED efficiency is steadily approaching its practical limit, Milz said there is still room and demand for even higher efficiency. “The market demand is that same drumbeat—more for less, and improved performance across the board,” he added.

Bouck pointed out a lot more attention is being given to application, not simply light source, efficiency. “Our customers recognize that energy consumption per site is the metric that matters, not lumens per watt,” he said. “Our goal is to deliver superior optical distributions that maximize the usage of every watt and provide specifiers with options to direct illumination where it is needed most for their application.”

Milz agreed, stating, “There’s more attention being paid to optical control, especially from a visual comfort standpoint—and therefore especially at low mounting heights. Customers are savvy enough now to look for LED fixture designs that reduce glare and employ highly efficient optics to distribute light with as little loss as possible, and in ways that enable light to be directed exactly—and only—where it is supposed to go.”

Advances in optical control allow precise distribution, minimal glare, and an overall potentially higher application efficiency. This capability also dovetails into two other outdoor lighting concerns, which is minimizing light trespass—light entering properties where it is considered a nuisance or disruptive—and skyglow—light wasted upward toward the sky.

Numerous local ordinances, a model ordinance authored by the Illuminating Engineering Society and the International Dark-Sky Association, and various metrics address this and similar issues. The latest development is the LUNA Technical Requirements, which the DesignLights Consortium (DLC) intends to take effect in 2022. These requirements will affect products qualifying for utility rebates in a DLC Qualified Products List.

Light source color is a related issue, as the wavelength emission potentially affects people and wildlife. As the efficacy difference between warm and cool color temperatures narrowed, warm white became increasingly viable as a design choice and gained a boost when the American Medical Association issued guidelines several years ago advising adoption of warm-white roadway lighting.

“We continue to see demand for warmer CCTs, especially in public use spaces, where neighbors are close by and wildlife can be affected,” Milz said. “Despite a trend toward warmer color temperatures, we still see a sizable portion of our customers buying the cooler CCTs that have dominated in the past. The trend is starting, but it’s not yet a surge.”

He added that research into the impact of nighttime lighting on wildlife will tie into the color capabilities inherent in LED to make outdoor lighting designs more environmentally friendly.

Control trends

The latest commercial energy codes and standards require that outdoor area luminaires be capable of automatically turning On and Off either based on a photocontrol or time schedule. Some dusk-to-dawn luminaires may also be required to reduce output during lack of occupancy using a sensor.

Outdoor LED luminaires are well equipped for these and other controls using the NEMA standard seven-pin socket, which accommodates a variety of devices, whatever the customer might need now or in the future. Wireless controls enable data for measuring and monitoring along with integration with other systems, including the indoor lighting system.

“When outdoor lighting interacts with and responds to our needs and activities with the same degree of personalization that our phones do?” Milz asked. “That will be the next big thing. Which means greater focus on more and more integrated controls, along with a continued drop in costs and attendant rise in the potential for LED-enabled IoT applications.”

Opportunities

Electrical distributors have opportunities with this category, from new construction to early LED adopters now entering the replacement cycle to energy-saving retrofits. Some projects may be relatively simple, others more involved in terms of controllability and restrictions on light distribution. Increasingly, projects may become more ambitious, integrating additional services and other systems, particularly as smart cities develop.

Milz encourages distributors to get educated and maintain close and frequent interaction with manufacturers, even to the point of integrating to produce digital visibility of each other’s supply chain. “When the manufacturer can see your inventory, you never need to worry about empty shelves,” he said. “When you can see the manufacturer’s, you know in real time exactly what commitments you can make.”

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