Category: People

Cheryl English Assumes Presidency of the IES (2017-2018)

Cheryl English has assumed the office of President of the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES), succeeding Shirley Coyle. Cheryl English has been a member of the IES for 35 years. She…

Cheryl English has assumed the office of President of the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES), succeeding Shirley Coyle.

Cheryl English has been a member of the IES for 35 years. She has worked for Acuity Brands in a number of positions including application design, testing, education and marketing, culminating in her current position as Vice President, Government and Industry Relations. On behalf of the IES, English helped develop the Joint IDA-IES Model Lighting Ordinance, the IES classification system for Outdoor Luminaires (TM-15) and the first series of IES ED education programs. She has served on a variety of IES committees: Board of Fellows, Medal Award, Marks Award, Lighting Economics, Sustainable Lighting, Educational Materials, Education Seminars, Legislative & Regulatory and Computer. English has been awarded the Distinguished Service Award, the Fellow Award, and an IES Presidential Award.

2017-2018 IES BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Lance Bennett, (Vice-President / President-Elect), Eaton’s Lighting Business
Shirley Coyle, LC, (Past President), Cree, Inc.
James Radi, (Treasurer), Shat-R-Shield

AT LARGE DIRECTORS
Susanne Seitinger, PhD, Philips Lighting
Antonio Garza, Iluminacion Total, SA de CV
Naomi Miller, Pacific Northwest Laboratory
Wilson Dau, LC, Dau Design and Consulting, Inc.
Frank Agraz, Frank Agraz
Francois-Xavier Morin, LC, LightFX

REGIONAL DIRECTORS
Jennifer Jaques, LC, (South Region), Lighting Application Sciences, LLC
Michelle (Shelly) Prew, (Midwest Region), Eaton Lighting
Antonio Giacobbe, (West Region), Acuity Brands
Rick Paradis, (Northeast Region), Synergy Investment

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LUX Names Russell Foster 2016 Person of the Year

UK-based lighting publication LUX is becoming a must-read magazine for me along with LD+A. The magazine recently awarded 2016 Person of the Year to Professor Russell Foster. Foster’s team at…

russellUK-based lighting publication LUX is becoming a must-read magazine for me along with LD+A.

The magazine recently awarded 2016 Person of the Year to Professor Russell Foster. Foster’s team at Oxford University discovered the eye’s third type of photosensitive cell, which connects to the circadian system. This discovery created the possibility of practical circadian lighting.

Click here to learn more.

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Dawn De Grazio Appointed Technical Editor at IES

The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) recently appointed Dawn De Grazio as Technical Editor, effective October 3. This newly created staff position will assist technical committees and IES…

dawn-degrazioThe Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) recently appointed Dawn De Grazio as Technical Editor, effective October 3.

This newly created staff position will assist technical committees and IES Staff with editing IES standards, documents, and articles for accuracy and consistency. The position requires a high level of lighting technical knowledge and the ability to accurately describe, in both verbal and written communications, the intent of IES Standards to a broad audience. De Grazio reports to the Technical Director of Standards, Brian Liebel.

Prior to being appointed Technical Editor, De Grazio was elected by members of the IES as an At-Large Director on the IES Board of Directors. She previously was employed as the Director of Customer Education for Lighting Analysts in Littleton, Colorado. She has served as a member of the several IES technical committees, including Roadway Lighting Committee, Outdoor Environmental Lighting Committee, and Marks Award Committee, and was Secretary of the Visual Effects of Lamp Spectral Distribution Committee. She also contributed to several IES publications and received the IES Distinguished Service Award in 2012. De Grazio graduated from the Architectural Engineering program at the University of Colorado Boulder.

I’ve known Dawn for a number of years, and consider her one of the most knowledgeable and dedicated professionals in our industry. This is a great move for IES and for Dawn as well. Congratulations, Dawn!

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Mariana Figueiro Named Acting Director of LRC

Mark Rea, Director of the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has taken an academic sabbatical for the upcoming fiscal year. During this time, Dr. Rea will focus…

Mark Rea, Director of the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has taken an academic sabbatical for the upcoming fiscal year. During this time, Dr. Rea will focus on developing two new LRC initiatives: the Glenn W. Bailey Memorial Fellowship, which supports activities that integrate the business of lighting into the education of graduate students at the LRC, and a program related to plant pathology and horticultural lighting. He will also continue to work on existing funded research projects.

Mariana Figueiro, LRC Light & Health Program Director, has been named Acting Director and will lead the center during this time. Dr. Figueiro has been with the LRC for 20 years, where she started as a graduate student in the LRC’s Master of Science in Lighting program. She continued as a staff scientist at the LRC and in 2004, obtained her PhD from Rensselaer. In 2006, she was offered a tenure-track position as an assistant professor and in 2014, was promoted to full professor.

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Shirley Coyle Assumes Presidency of the IES

Shirley Coyle, LC has assumed the office of President of the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES). Coyle is President of Cree Canada, a business unit of Cree, Inc. During her career,…

Shirley Coyle, LC has assumed the office of President of the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES).

Coyle is President of Cree Canada, a business unit of Cree, Inc. During her career, she has worked for several international lighting companies and has been Lighting Certified since 2000.

Coyle has been a member of the IES for 31 years and has served in several responsible capacities in the past: President of the Toronto Section, District Chair and Board of Directors. She serves on several IES committees including Roadway Lighting, Outdoor Environmental Lighting, and Street & Area Lighting. Coyle is also a committee member for several CSA Group standards committees on lighting including Roadway and Solid State Lighting.

President-Elect, 2017 – 2018:

Cheryl English, LC, Acuity Brands

IES Board of Directors:

Mark Roush, LC (Past President), Experience Light, LLC
James Radi, (Treasurer), Shat-R-Shield
Boyd Corbett, Lumato Lighting
Jeffrey J. Davis, LC, System Design Consultants
Dawn DeGrazio, Lighting Analysts, Inc.
Antonio Garza, Iluminacion Total, SA de CV
Antonio Giacobbe, Acuity Brands
Jennifer Jaques, Lighting Application Sciences, LLC
Francois-Xavier Morin, LC, LightFX
Susanne Seitinger, PhD, Philips Lighting

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Masters of Light Webcast Series

The UK’s LIGHTING Magazine recently completed a series of live webcasts, “Masters of Light.” In this series, lighting designers, artists and architects talk about their work, methods and philosophy in…

mastersThe UK’s LIGHTING Magazine recently completed a series of live webcasts, “Masters of Light.” In this series, lighting designers, artists and architects talk about their work, methods and philosophy in one-hour retrospectives hosted by the magazine’s editors.

Sign up here to check out the archived episodes.

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Tom Butters Named IES Director of Education

The Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) has appointed Tom Butters as the new IES Director of Education, effective August 1, 2016. This new position was established to address the growing need…

iesThe Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) has appointed Tom Butters as the new IES Director of Education, effective August 1, 2016.

This new position was established to address the growing need for continuing education courses in the lighting industry and the expanding role of education within IES for the benefit of its members. Butters will oversee the development, implementation and delivery of IES educational programs for professional development, higher educational institutions, and the public at-large. In addition, Butters will develop educational outreach tools and activities to assist lighting professionals in advancing their proficiency through continuing education. Butters will report to the Executive Vice President and work closely with the Directors of Standards and Membership Services.

Since 2007, Butters has been Director/Sr. Manager of Canlyte’s Lighting Concept Centre/Philips Lighting University, one of the busiest educational facilities in North America. He has 30 years in the lighting industry with 15 years developing and delivering lighting education programs based on IES recommendations to all segments of the industry. Butters has served as a Board Director, President, and Education Chair of the Toronto Section of the IES. He was also Vice District Chair of the IES District for Eastern Canada.

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GE’s Jason Brown on Lighting and the Industrial Internet of Things

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Jason Brown, Manager, Strategic Solutions for Current, powered by GE. The topic: lighting and the Industrial Internet of Things. I’m happy to share…

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Jason Brown, Manager, Strategic Solutions for Current, powered by GE. The topic: lighting and the Industrial Internet of Things. I’m happy to share his responses with you here. The interview informed an article I wrote for the June issue of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR.

DiLouie: How do you see lighting fitting into the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)?

Brown: For over a century, lights were isolated devices that served a single purpose. Today, thanks to the Industrial Internet, lighting is becoming essential to the intelligence landscape of enterprises of all types, including retail stores, hospitals, universities, cities and utilities. Few technologies have experienced such a profound transformation after so much time. How we think about lighting has fundamentally changed with the blending of our physical and digital worlds. Suddenly, lighting is considerably more important to how businesses and cities operate in the most efficient manner. Going forward, the focus of industry is on using data to reduce costs and improve services.

DiLouie: With intelligent lighting control, one could argue the Internet of Lighting is already here. How do you see lighting control fitting into the IIoT?

Brown: Intelligent controls are a first step to energy reduction schemes, including simple switching, on/off time schedules, occupancy sensing and daylight harvesting. Many of these controls can also be synced with a building management system to take functionality to the next level. What this provides is a foundation for simple automation that, over time, allows organizations to migrate more cost-effectively to other intelligent systems and IIoT solutions.

DiLouie: What capabilities and benefits will lighting-IIoT integration present that go beyond the capabilities and benefits of today’s advanced lighting control systems?

Brown: Lighting systems embedded with sensors, transmitters and microprocessors offer data-gathering and digital capabilities that controls do not. A street lamp using controls can dim to 60 percent at 6:00 a.m. to save energy, for example. An intelligent street lamp, however, can dim to 60 percent, identify if the roadway needs plowed, monitor congestion and adjust traffic signal timing for optimum flow, scan lanes for stalled vehicles, measure pollen count, and perform a self-diagnostic check, instantly sending data to the cloud where it is accessible to city managers.

Within stores, location-based technology in LED fixtures can give retailers the ability to push targeted offers to shoppers’ smartphones or monitor inventory levels. In manufacturing environments, intelligent high-bay lighting can use its bird’s eye vantage point to track cranes and forklifts or spot foreign objects to reduce accidents and slip-and-fall incidents. Smart LEDs can even sync up the light levels in hospital rooms with patients’ daily care schedules, resetting their circadian rhythms and helping them rest better.

The operational efficiencies and value-added services enabled by sensors, software and machine-to-machine learning will go far beyond the capabilities of even the most advanced lighting control systems.

DiLouie: Not all buildings will require extensive data collection beyond lighting, HVAC and occupancy. Will the IIoT be scalable? Who will own these different levels in terms of collecting and presenting information?

Brown: The IIoT will allow energy solutions tailored to specific needs, whether that’s simple lighting and HVAC control in your local supermarket or miles of connected city street lights. LED lighting will be an entry point for most customers as it puts a highly scalable, intelligent infrastructure in place—one that can evolve over time to offer more beneficial insights and outcomes as learning takes place.

Less clear is who will own and analyze the information that’s collected, but the likely scenario is that the responsibility will be a shared one between the customer and their solution provider, with strategic support from a community of specialized partners. Today, there is no single method or established model for building an intelligent enterprise—it can be what you imagine it to be.

DiLouie: What role will lighting control manufacturers, who already offer management and analysis software, play in IIoT integration? Will they work with or compete with tech giants interested in the IIoT market?

Brown: Manufacturers certainly won’t create all of the solutions. Apple and the iPhone is a great example of this—if we can show what’s possible, we can inspire others to invent their own applications. Partnerships between manufacturers and tech companies are key to making intelligent lighting environments an open platform for innovation. Collaborative relationships will ensure products go to market based on feedback and intimacy with the customer. At Current, our culture is to embrace, test and perfect the brightest ideas, no matter where they originate.

DiLouie: What labor is required for IIoT implementation with LED lighting? What kinds of work can be performed by existing players like electrical contractors, and what new specialized labor will be needed?

Brown: Electrical contractors and technicians have been equipping lamps with electronic devices for quite some time when you consider lighting controls and occupancy sensors. Certainly, they can expect to invest in some new training around installation and network communications, but the basic knowledge and flexibility to troubleshoot, document and commission is already there. Given manufacturers’ focus on integrating intelligent components directly into light fixtures, complexity becomes even less of an issue.

Those looking to embrace IIoT opportunities should also begin to foster a partner network including software and connectivity service providers—specialists who can help you quickly earn the customer’s confidence and solve bigger challenges such as the integration of different IT systems.

It’s likely that many contractors will find greater comfortability with intelligent solutions than first expected, given the number of professionals who already rely on mobile devices and digital tools every day.

DiLouie: Will mass deployment of the IIoT be beneficial or disruptive (or both) to the lighting and electrical industries, and in what ways?

Brown: As more and more devices become connected to the IIoT, it will benefit both industries by opening new revenue streams and inspiring greater collaboration. There will be strong demand not only for intelligent devices and applications, but for the experts who can make sense of them. The possibility that connectivity holds for expanding operations and public services is immense. The Industrial Internet means we are connecting to the things that make our world run, to help them run better, and that’s good business no matter how you approach it.

DiLouie: What might a typical IIoT deployment look like? What systems and components are involved from lighting, control and data collection to owner use and benefit?

Brown: IIoT deployment, as the solutions are so end-user specific, is anything but typical. Solutions are developed to meet the specific application. With that in mind, an ability to be collaborative and customize data collection to drive customer improvements is critical.

For example, a high-rise office building could install intelligent LED lighting, invest in on-site solar power generation, then configure a network of sensors to continually shift energy use to avoid peak grid pricing. In a typical scenario, nodes or sensors integrated inside the light fixtures capture and send data to a wireless gateway, which delivers the data via cellular or Ethernet backhaul to a server (“the cloud”), where it becomes accessible through a Web-based portal or interface, and where software platforms can be leveraged to turn that real-time operational data into insight for better and faster decision-making.

DiLouie: What do electrical contractors need to know today about the IIoT and how it might affect their business?

Brown: There is a recent study by the International Data Corporation that estimates the worldwide market for Internet of Things solutions will grow from about $2 trillion to $7 trillion by 2020. That’s a lot of economic value around smart analytics, and it demonstrates the strong demand for applications that leverage data to increase operational efficiency, drive sales, or shed light on customers’ needs. The transformation won’t happen overnight, but the momentum is unmistakable.

What contractors need to know is that customers are beginning to view lighting and energy as a service, not a product sale, and those who can visualize better outcomes will quickly separate themselves from the competition.

DiLouie: What are lighting and control manufacturers doing right now to prepare for and ideally play a part in the IIoT?

Brown: At Current, we’ve been incubating several other areas of our business, including solar power, on-site power generation, energy storage systems and electric vehicle charging solutions. Through LED lighting and the software to manage it, we will deliver an infrastructure for intelligence that enables customers to reduce their energy spending with the help of renewable resources and other technologies. Taking a holistic approach allows Current to engineer solutions that not only change the way our customers use energy, but also when and where they get it.

DiLouie: If you could tell the entire electrical industry just one thing about the IIoT, what would it be?

Brown: To dream big. The new energy landscape will favor bold solutions. Explore your ideas and accept risk. Partner with others who share your commitment to learning and understand anything is possible if you can imagine it—that the world changes one ‘light bulb’ moment at a time.

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Philips’ Tim McKinney on Outdoor Area Lighting Trends

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Tim McKinney, Product Marketing (Outdoor) North America, Philips Lighting. The topic: trends in outdoor area lighting. I’m happy to share his responses with…

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Tim McKinney, Product Marketing (Outdoor) North America, Philips Lighting. The topic: trends in outdoor area lighting. I’m happy to share his responses with you here. The interview informed an article I wrote for the March 2016 issue of tED.

DiLouie: How would you characterize demand for outdoor area lighting?

McKinney: The demand for Outdoor area lighting is stronger than ever. Public safety continues to be of the utmost importance in today’s society and lighting plays a major role in providing a safer environment. Demand is also being spurred by new technological innovations particularly in the area of connected lighting. Connected luminaires are beginning to appear for every conceivable professional lighting application, from street lighting to office lighting to façade lighting to display lighting in shops and supermarkets. Connected lighting goes far beyond the idea of controls as you can read in this article: http://origin.www.futureoflight.philips.com/post/130067433906/connected-lighting-the-internet-of-illuminated

DiLouie: How would you characterize demand for LED outdoor area lighting?

McKinney: The demand for LEDs is much higher than HID in nearly all categories and continues to increase every year. When comparing the pricing for conventional HID luminaires to today’s LED luminaires, especially when comparing the total cost of ownership, the conversion to LED is a great choice.

What percentage of new unit sales of outdoor area luminaires is specified with LED sources relative to traditional sources like HID?

In some applications the percentage of new unit sales compared to HID can be as high as 95% for LED. On average for total Outdoor area, we estimate the market to be around 65%. By 2019 this share will be more like 80% according to research by Navigant.

DiLouie: What characteristics of the LED source particularly lend themselves to outdoor area lighting? What are the benefits of using LED in this type of luminaire?

McKinney: At the highest level, LEDs are point sources so you can put the light where you want and need it versus simply spreading light all over. This is a major benefit of LEDs. Even in Outdoor area lighting, there are varying needs from retail applications to automotive and pedestrian traffic. These all need to be illuminated properly without compromising adjacent properties and spaces. LEDs with specialized, individual optical control makes this possible.

DiLouie: How are today’s LED outdoor area luminaires substantially different in terms of design than their HID predecessors?

McKinney: Due to the sensitive nature of the light source in terms of thermal ranges and effect on lumen output and life, today’s luminaires require a much more sophisticated and thoughtful engineering design. This also means there needs to be robust testing to make sure the LEDs meet their promises over the entire life of the product.

DiLouie: How would you categorize outdoor area luminaires in terms of equipment/application types? Which do LED lend themselves most well?

McKinney: Our Outdoor area luminaires cover a wide range of applications, and we provide luminaires that fit nearly every value proposition. Regardless of whether the customer is motivated by price, aesthetics, performance, or even “connected” lighting options, we have a luminaire or family of luminaires to fit their need. The great thing about LEDs, is that they are versatile providing significant energy savings and control capabilities for all applications.

DiLouie: Is there a white goods and specification segment of the market? How big is each (compared to the other)? How predominant is LED in each?

McKinney: There is always a market for lower cost, less featured, and to some extent high volume luminaires even in the Outdoor area lighting category, regardless of the source. Additionally and thankfully, there is also a market where aesthetics, performance, and other features and benefits are valued and selected. In terms of the size of each market, it’s difficult to say with any degree of real accuracy but both are significant.

For new construction, the overwhelming majority is LED. HID continues to be sold as replacements in older installations where the entire site may not be changing, or once again where price of luminaire is the primary consideration for purchasing. Additionally, some areas of the country enjoy lower energy rates where “energy savings” and “financial payback” aren’t as significant. The great thing about that is as a manufacturer we continue to offer luminaires with HID and LED sources continuing to serve the entire market.

DiLouie: What are the top three technological trends in LED outdoor area luminaire design? What are the benefits of these trends?

McKinney: First, LEDs continue to improve every year. This allows Outdoor area luminaire designs to be more efficacious using fewer LEDs to produce the same amount of light or deliver more light if needed with less energy. This lowers our costs and the price to the consumer.

Secondly, we are at a turning point in lighting controls. We are now seeing control systems evolve to take advantage of the digital nature of LED lighting. LEDs can be readily integrated with other intelligent systems like mobile and cloud-based technologies.

Thirdly, the demand for a broader range of color temperatures is increasing. Initially, in Outdoor area lighting, delivering “enough” lumens to compete with HID was a challenge at a price point the market would accept. The “cooler” temperatures were much more efficacious at the time when compared to the “warmer” colors we have available today, and therefore the dominant choice in Outdoor area lighting was around 5700K. This gap in lumen output based on color temperature is declining and as a result the market has shifted significantly towards the warmer colors in almost every application. Today the dominant color is 4000K, with the demand and the desire for even warmer colors on the rise.

DiLouie: What kinds of optical systems are available with LED outdoor area luminaires, and how do they differ in terms of utility, cost and applications?

McKinney: In today’s global market place and purchasing capabilities over the internet, all kinds of “components” and optical systems are available today to anyone. A wide variety of materials and distributions, and a host of promises are rampant. The thing to remember is that anyone can deliver light.

But truly understanding the characteristics of the entire Solid State Lighting system, and designing accordingly is the differentiator. Regardless of the optics used, if the thermal properties of the LED, and the driver, and any other electronic component are not managed properly, the expected life of the system and the promises will not be met.

DiLouie: Where are these trends taking us? What will LED outdoor area luminaires look like in 3-5 years? Integrated technologies, interactive capabilities?

McKinney: Even though we are less restricted today in terms of our design capabilities and aesthetics based on the size of the LEDs and other material and light source choices, the mainstream luminaires themselves may not” look” that much different in 3-5 years.

But you’re right in asking about the technologies and interactive capabilities. I often say, “Remember when a phone was a phone?” The same is true for lighting and where we are in the “beyond lumination” journey.

One of my favorite recent examples is Claudia Paz’s three-dimensional interactive façade for the Banco del Credito in Lima, Peru. She has created a truly monumental yet subtle installation. For certain hours in the early evening anyone can step up to an interactive podium and create different natural scenes like sand or rain. The experience is accompanied by a custom soundtrack Paz created with her collaborators. The interaction is intuitive and poetic at the same time. Of course this goes far beyond site and area lighting for functional illumination. Still, it is part of the breadth lighting offers for outdoor spaces.

Advancements in sensors, connected lighting capabilities for control and feedback, public assistance and city wide emergency response capabilities, homeland and localized security needs, all make lighting an interesting choice for these types of capabilities.

DiLouie: What opportunities are there today with lighting controls being integrated with LED outdoor area luminaires? What types of controls are used, and what are their benefits?

McKinney: Controls provide multiple benefits. The primary benefit is increased energy reduction providing even greater savings to the owner and reducing our carbon footprint on the world. We’re all aware of the dimming capabilities of LED, a significant benefit over HID. And of course added motion sensing and daylight sensing can also be used to manage light levels and once again reduce energy.

Additional controls and systems can also be used to proactively monitor the performance of the luminaires themselves and report any variances/outages as needed. This significantly reduces maintenance and management costs, and provides quicker response to repair or replace damaged luminaires to improve public safety.

Additional benefits and other opportunities with LEDs ad controls with the proper systems are to use lighting and “color” to enhance your property or City to improve the experience. Entire spaces can be converted to bring people together, enjoy the night life outdoors, and improve the financial outlook in that area. All very beneficial to any property owner or City official. Again more than just simple on/off or dimming is the real benefits of solid state lighting and systems.

We are also taking a unique approach to outdoor controls. For example, through our work with Los Angeles we have shown how it is possible to revolutionize the control of street lighting and other outdoor lighting. Los Angeles is the first city in the world to control its street lighting through mobile and cloud-based technologies. With almost no commissioning effort at all the city will be able to connect to all its assets directly. Over time performance data or energy consumption metrics can be share with multiple systems across the city. We are about to experience a radical shift in how control systems are deployed in outdoor lighting.

DiLouie: What should distributors be doing right now to maximize the value they offer to their customers in lighting projects featuring LED products?

McKinney: As mentioned before, anyone can deliver light. Our industry today is inundated with so many new manufacturers making claims about light equivalency and life. And when they fail, they hurt the industry and the technology.

My recommendation to every consumer or distributor is to make sure those claims are valid and supported with proper engineering and certifications. Additionally, ask for or recommend that an application layout is done to ensure that the right amount of light levels and uniformity are being delivered for that application. Regardless of how it is was lit before in the case of a renovation; the space and needs may have changed and therefore, so should the lighting.

DiLouie: If you could tell the entire electrical industry just one thing about LED outdoor area luminaires, what would it be?

McKinney: Depending on the application, LEDs represent 60 – 99% of our total sales in Outdoor area lighting and growing rapidly. With hundreds of thousands of installations, we’re confident in the technology when designed properly, and we’re very excited about the future of LEDs and integrated systems to enhance all of our lives. This is truly a very exciting time in the Lighting Industry.

DiLouie: Is there anything else you’d like to add about this topic?

McKinney: Many companies, including ours, can provide educational opportunities to assist in the continued education and advancement of LED and systems knowledge. Just ask. We’re here to help.

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Brian Liebel, PE, Chosen as IES Technical Director of Standards

The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) recently appointed Brian Liebel as the new Technical Director of Standards, effective February 16, 2016. Liebel succeeds Rita Harrold, who retired June…

The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) recently appointed Brian Liebel as the new Technical Director of Standards, effective February 16, 2016.

Liebel succeeds Rita Harrold, who retired June 30, 2015. While Liebel will primarily be responsible for overseeing the development and production of IES Standards, he will also play a key role in developing plans and implementing programs to meet the objectives of the 2014-2020 IES Strategic Plan specific to Educational, Consensus, Research and Advocacy objectives.

It’s a tough and important job, with tough shoes to fill after Rita Harrold’s departure, but Liebel appears to be well suited to it.

Liebel joined the IES as a student while attending the University of Kansas School of Architectural Engineering, then under the direction of Ron “Doc” Helms. He attributes his dedication to lighting and the Society from his experience at KU, where he was a member of the first class of Besal Scholarship recipients in 1984. Throughout his 30-year career, Liebel has been involved with the IES as an educator, committee chair, and for the last 2½ years, a member of the Board of Directors. His professional career path has always emphasized his belief in melding the art and science of lighting design and illuminating engineering; he has received awards for both innovative design and technical achievement, been a recognized advocate for quality lighting in energy codes, and provided design guidance in lighting research. He received the Presidential Award at this year’s Annual Conference for overseeing the IES Business Review that was conducted in 2015.

Congratulations, Brian!

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