Category: Lighting Design

IES Illumination Awards Submissions Due February 12

I have just received a notice that submissions are now being accepted online for the 2010 IES Illumination Awards. The catch is the deadline is Friday, February 12, 2010. Better…

I have just received a notice that submissions are now being accepted online for the 2010 IES Illumination Awards. The catch is the deadline is Friday, February 12, 2010.

Better hurry! Visit the submission site now to submit your project.

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Peerless Offers Continuing Education Course for Best Practices in Classroom Lighting

Peerless has announced the start of AIA-approved Continuing Education Courses offered online at ArchitectCES.com. “Lighting for Learning,” which I was pleased to work with Peerless to produce, is the first…

LightingForLearningPeerless has announced the start of AIA-approved Continuing Education Courses offered online at ArchitectCES.com.

“Lighting for Learning,” which I was pleased to work with Peerless to produce, is the first on many courses to come that were designed by Peerless to help architects and lighting professionals learn best practices for lighting and controls.

This sustainable design learning unit focuses in particular on Classroom Lighting and Controls and describes how the learning environment is improved upon by changing lighting options. Upon completion of the Peerless-sponsored “Lighting for Learning” course, you will be able to describe at least two control settings and how they impact light quantity and quality in a school setting.

The course will also enable you to describe how and why the Collaborative for High Performance Schools seeks to improve interior lighting. In addition, you will learn how lighting can affect the economics of a school budget.

The PEERLESS sponsored course provides 1 LU/HSW/SD relating to health, safety and/or welfare (HSW) criteria in the newly required Sustainable Design (SD) topic. (As of January 1, 2009 all AIA Architects are required to take 4 Learning Units of “Sustainable Design” coursework to meet AIA continuing education requirements and retain AIA membership.)

Take the course anytime, 24/7, here.

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Using Color to Create an Uncomfortable Atmosphere

Lighting designer Keith Parham shows us how color was used to create an uncomfortable atmosphere in his lighting of “Adding Machine: A Musical.” Check it out here.

addingmachineLighting designer Keith Parham shows us how color was used to create an uncomfortable atmosphere in his lighting of “Adding Machine: A Musical.”

Check it out here.

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Wall Street Journal Takes on International Dark Sky Association

The Wall Street Journal paints the International Dark Sky Association as Big Brother in Eric Felten’s opinion piece here. Once again, lighting takes a backseat to politics, but perhaps not…

Give me glare or give me death!

Give me glare or give me death!

The Wall Street Journal paints the International Dark Sky Association as Big Brother in Eric Felten’s opinion piece here. Once again, lighting takes a backseat to politics, but perhaps not in the way Felten thinks. In the lighting industry, we often hope for lighting issues to enter the public consciousness. But once they do, they are immediately framed in ideological terms. Instead of asking, “Are CFLs an equivalent technology to incandescent?”, the debate is instead cast as a battle of survival of the human species versus economic liberty. And now, instead of asking, “What is good outdoor lighting?”, we are told a story of a battle between rugged individualists and oppressive village governments intent on currying favor with the Dark Sky folks.

IDA has published a sample list of lighting ordinances here.

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DOE Webtool Helps Designers of Retail Buildings Save Energy and Optimize Lighting Quality

The November issue of Electrical Contractor published an article here that I wrote about the Department of Energy’s Commercial Lighting Solutions for Retail webtool residing here. I was pleased to…

doe1The November issue of Electrical Contractor published an article here that I wrote about the Department of Energy’s Commercial Lighting Solutions for Retail webtool residing here. I was pleased to contribute to the webtool with general language about lighting control recommendations.

The DOE’s CLS for Office version is about to be released in a beta version and formally launched at LIGHTFAIR 2010. I was pleased to work with DOE and the controls industry to ensure a much stronger presence for lighting controls in this version, including actual templates on par with the lighting templates. I will be joining the project team in presenting the DOE tool at LIGHTFAIR 2010. More on that later.

For now, check out the article here and CLS for Retail here!doe2

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Acuity Brands Controls Launches LightingforLearning.com Website

Peerless Lighting and Acuity Brands Controls, both of whom I’m proud to call clients, have joined forces to launch Lighting for Learning, an online tool that helps school designers design…

Peerless Lighting and Acuity Brands Controls, both of whom I’m proud to call clients, have joined forces to launch Lighting for Learning, an online tool that helps school designers design optimal lighting for classrooms.

First, the designer inputs the characteristics of the classroom and desired lighting features, such as light level, color quality, aesthetics and control flexibility. the designer is then able to view an integrated design package filtered from thousands of lighting and control product options. Once the designer chooses the option that’s right for the project, they can download complete custom documentation including drawings, bill of materials, cut sheets, performance specs and product literature. Finally, the package arrives at the jobsite with all components clearly labeled and ready to install easily using plug-and-play connections.

Take a few minutes and try it for yourself here.

lightingforlearning

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Illuminate Editorial: “Change Has Arrived”

Big changes are in the works that will impact future lighting designs by eliminating some of the least-efficient and lowest-cost products from the market, while establishing ambitious new goals for…

Big changes are in the works that will impact future lighting designs by eliminating some of the least-efficient and lowest-cost products from the market, while establishing ambitious new goals for energy codes that may severely limit design choices.

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 expanded ballast regulations put into effect by the Department of Energy in 2002. By July of next year—with few exceptions—ballast makers will be prohibited from manufacturing magnetic ballasts for full-wattage and energy-saving 4- and 8-ft. T12 lamps in new luminaires or even for replacement purposes.

The magnetic ballast will basically be eliminated. And now, with the introduction of new DOE regulations that take effect July 14, 2012, so will the T12 lamps they operate.

The new DOE rules expand upon efficiency rules established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 by strengthening standards for covered lamp types while also covering 8-ft. T8 lamps, 4-ft. T5 lamps and more wattages of 4-ft. T8 and T12 lamps. The net result is a majority of 4-ft. linear and 2-ft. U-shaped T12 lamps, many 8-ft. T12 and T12HO, and some lower-color-rendering 4-ft. T8 lamps will be eliminated, with some exemptions. While no longer popular in new construction, an estimated 30% of fluorescent 4-ft. lamps sold each year are T12s.

The incandescent lamp is still on the ropes after the Energy Independence and Security Act targeted 40-100W incandescents with new efficiency standards that take effect 2012-2014, with the market expected to shift to compact fluorescent. Meanwhile, new DOE energy standards for incandescent reflector lamps, building on the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, will eliminate many 40-205W R, PAR, BR, ER and BPAR Lamps with a diameter larger than 2.5 in., with only some HIR lamps complying.

In the HID family, mercury vapor and probe-start metal halide lamps have already been impacted. On January 1, 2009, federal law began eliminating probe-start lamps from new 150-500W metal halide luminaires, with the market shifting to compliant pulse-start lamps. A year before that, on January 1, 2008, manufacture of most mercury vapor ballasts was outlawed.

And more change is coming with the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009. As of the time of writing in early September, the Senate and House of Representatives had begun final reconciliation on a final bill to send to the White House. This bill has been highly publicized because of its cap and trade program for carbon emissions. This program will require high-carbon-emitting power plants to purchase offsets, which will increase the cost of electricity in some regions of the country and in turn encourage more-efficient design in buildings.

The Act identifies certain types of outdoor and portable lighting and mandates minimum energy standards. But another provision that will have an enormous potential impact on design is a requirement for DOE to recognize new national commercial and residential energy code standards that achieve at least 30% energy savings over ASHRAE 90.1-2004 (commercial) and IECC 2006 (residential), starting with the next iteration of these standards. Then, by January 1, 2014, for residential buildings, and January 1, 2015, for commercial buildings, a target of 50% energy savings must be achieved. From January 1, 2017, for residential buildings, and January 1, 2018, for commercial buildings, additional savings of 5% must be achieved every three years until 2029 and 2030, respectively.

That energy is going to have to come from somewhere, either technology—such as lighting controls and LED—or design. In the near term, lighting design will only become more challenging. In the long term, if technology does not deliver required energy savings, energy codes may increasingly dictate design choices. There is an opportunity here to have a conversation about lighting, but who will speak up for good lighting in public policy? Something that is not required by any legislation, but necessary for productivity, sales, architecture and so on? For most people, some 80% of their impressions of the world around them are visual. Light makes sight, but lighting shapes perception.

There’s a lot at stake. Energy conservation has good advocacy in public policy and it should. But so should good lighting.

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New Publication Provides Energy Efficiency Guidance for Hotels

Recommendations on achieving 30% energy savings over minimum code requirements are contained in the newly published Advanced Energy Design Guide for Highway Lodging. The book, published by ASHRAE, gives guidance…

Recommendations on achieving 30% energy savings over minimum code requirements are contained in the newly published Advanced Energy Design Guide for Highway Lodging.

Hotel

The book, published by ASHRAE, gives guidance to architects, engineers, contractors and other building team members on how to easily achieve advanced levels of energy savings without having to resort to detailed calculations or analyses.

Lighting guidance includes:

* In interior corridors, lighting often runs 24 hours a day. This is an area for possible daylight savings from toplighting (skylights) or occupancy sensors that reduce lighting when the space is unoccupied.

* Use compact fluorescent lighting in downlights, wall sconces and table lamps. Use incandescent lighting sparingly, such as in accent lighting of artwork or highlighting of special architectural features in the lobby. Use translucent wall sconces and table lamps to better light the space and patrons faces.

* Use compact fluorescent fixtures with electronic ballasts in all plug-in table and floor lamps in guest rooms, lobbies and common areas.

Written in partnership with The American Institute of Architects, the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, the U.S. Green Building Council, and the U.S. Department of Energy, the book is available for free in electronic form here.

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Free Animation Player Spreads The Word About Light Pollution

The UK-based “Need Less” anti-light pollution group is now offering a free animation player that randomly plays six different clips that help raise awareness of the need to reduce light…

The UK-based “Need Less” anti-light pollution group is now offering a free animation player that randomly plays six different clips that help raise awareness of the need to reduce light pollution and reduce energy consumption. The animation player is downloadable and can be placed on your web page to help spread the word.

Check it out here.

Here are some examples of how it looks:




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