Category: Lighting Design

IALD Urges Lighting Community to Respond to Texas Bill

IALD is hoping the Texas Senate Business & Commerce Committee will remove language restrictive to the profession as a “technical adjustment” when the bill is prepared for the Governor’s signature,…

IALD is hoping the Texas Senate Business & Commerce Committee will remove language restrictive to the profession as a “technical adjustment” when the bill is prepared for the Governor’s signature, or the eventual veto of the bill by the Governor should no changes in language be made.

Here’s what IALD says we can do:

1. IF YOU ONLY HAVE TIME TO CONTACT ONE PERSON, call Texas Rep. Wayne Smith at +1 512 463 0733. Rep. Smith initiated the bill in the Texas State House of Representatives without the language restricting the lighting design profession, and/or email him and let him know your opinion on the bill before it goes into committee Friday evening.

2. Since the Senate added the Lighting Designer language after the House approved the bill, the House must review the bill once more. If you live in Texas, contact your representative or just email them all at once to make sure they know that the lighting designer language impacts too many people. Twitter to Texas Representatives: @aaronpena, @AllenFletcher, @RepHughes, @Dan_Flynn, @dangattis, @TXRepErodriguez, @gfcoleman, @jddeshotel, @SpeakerStraus, @RepHancock, @lhbcampaign, @MarcVeasey, @MikeVillarreal, @TMF116.

3. Call Texas Senator Bob Deuell, Senate sponsor of the bill, at 512.463.0102 and/or email him and let him know your opinion on the bill ASAP.

4. Call Texas Senator Kip Averitt, who introduced the amendments to the bill specific to lighting designers, at 512.463.0122 and/or email him and let him know your opinion on the bill ASAP.

5. Make sure Texas State Governor Perry knows this bill is coming to him and ask that he veto it. Phone in your opinion to 512.463.1782. Fax to 512.463.1849. Email using his contact form. Twitter to @TexGov and @GovernorPerry.

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Texas Passes Bill Requiring Licensing to Do Lighting Design (updated)

Wow. This is terrible. Yesterday, I received an email from IALD about Texas HB2649/SB2414 (the House and Senate versions are identical), “An Act Relating to the Regulation and Practice of…

Wow. This is terrible. Yesterday, I received an email from IALD about Texas HB2649/SB2414 (the House and Senate versions are identical), “An Act Relating to the Regulation and Practice of Engineering,” which requires professionals who do lighting design to be a licensed electrician, architect, interior designer, landscape architect or engineer.

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The bill passed the House 139-0 on May 7 and the Senate 31-0 on May 27. Click here to see the steps in the legislative process and where this legislation stands now. The next step in the process is for it to be sent to Governor Rick Perry to be signed into law.

The legislation defines “lighting design services” as “preparation of plans and specifications that depict the placement and direction of illumination of mounted or installed lighting fixtures in the interior or exterior of a building, including the specification of bulbs, reflectors, lens, louvers, baffles and other hardware. The term does not include the preparation of shop drawings or other directions from a manufacturer for the installation or operation of lighting fixtures.”

This requirement constitutes a third of the bill.

If signed into law, this requirement will be come effective September 1, 2009.

IALD stated that the legislation “has been drafted without any input from lighting designers, and restricts the practice of lighting design to members of other professions and trades, such as architects, engineers and electricians. There are no provisions in the legislation for establishing a licensing standard for lighting designers … We believe that the Texas Legislature does not mean to outlaw an entire profession, but that is the impact of the proposed legislation.”

IALD is hoping the Texas Senate Business & Commerce Committee will remove language restrictive to the profession as a “technical adjustment” when the bill is prepared for the Governor’s signature, or the eventual veto of the bill by the Governor should no changes in language be made.

Here’s what IALD says we can do:

1. IF YOU ONLY HAVE TIME TO CONTACT ONE PERSON, call Texas Rep. Wayne Smith at +1 512 463 0733. Rep. Smith initiated the bill in the Texas State House of Representatives without the language restricting the lighting design profession, and/or email him and let him know your opinion on the bill before it goes into committee Friday evening.

2. Since the Senate added the Lighting Designer language after the House approved the bill, the House must review the bill once more. If you live in Texas, contact your representative or just email them all at once to make sure they know that the lighting designer language impacts too many people. Twitter to Texas Representatives: @aaronpena, @AllenFletcher, @RepHughes, @Dan_Flynn, @dangattis, @TXRepErodriguez, @gfcoleman, @jddeshotel, @SpeakerStraus, @RepHancock, @lhbcampaign, @MarcVeasey, @MikeVillarreal, @TMF116.

3. Call Texas Senator Bob Deuell, Senate sponsor of the bill, at 512.463.0102 and/or email him and let him know your opinion on the bill ASAP.

4. Call Texas Senator Kip Averitt, who introduced the amendments to the bill specific to lighting designers, at 512.463.0122 and/or email him and let him know your opinion on the bill ASAP.

5. Make sure Texas State Governor Perry knows this bill is coming to him and ask that he veto it. Phone in your opinion to 512.463.1782. Fax to 512.463.1849. Email using his contact form. Twitter to @TexGov and @GovernorPerry.

Below is the specific language in the legislation, or you can click here.

SECTION 3. Subchapter G, Chapter 1001, Occupations Code, is
amended by adding Section 1001.3011 to read as follows:
Sec. 1001.3011. LIGHTING DESIGN; LICENSE OR REGISTRATION
REQUIRED. (a) A person may not perform or offer to perform
lighting design services unless the person is:
(1) licensed as an engineer under this chapter;
(2) registered as an architect, landscape architect,
or interior designer under Subtitle B, Title 6; or
(3) licensed under Chapter 1305.
(b) In this section, “lighting design services” means the
preparation of plans and specifications that depict the placement
and direction of illumination of mounted or installed lighting
fixtures in the interior or exterior of a building, including the
specification of bulbs, reflectors, lens, louvers, baffles, and
other hardware. The term does not include the preparation of shop
drawings or other directions from a manufacturer for the
installation or operation of lighting fixtures.
SECTION 4. Section 1001.401, Occupations Code, is amended
by adding Subsection (e) to read as follows:
(e) A license holder is not required to provide or hold any
additional certification, other than a license issued under this
chapter, to seal an engineering plan, specification, plat, or
report.
SECTION 5. Subchapter F, Chapter 1051, Occupations Code, is
amended by adding Section 1051.308 to read as follows:
Sec. 1051.308. LIGHTING DESIGN; REGISTRATION OR LICENSE
REQUIRED. (a) A person may not perform or offer to perform
lighting design services unless the person is:
(1) registered as an architect, landscape architect,
or interior designer under this subtitle;
(2) licensed as an engineer under Chapter 1001; or
(3) licensed under Chapter 1305.
(b) In this section, “lighting design services” means the
preparation of plans and specifications that depict the placement
and direction of illumination of mounted or installed lighting
fixtures in the interior or exterior of a building, including the
specification of bulbs, reflectors, lens, louvers, baffles, and
other hardware. The term does not include the preparation of shop
drawings or other directions from a manufacturer for the
installation or operation of lighting fixtures.
SECTION 6. Subchapter D, Chapter 1305, Occupations Code, is
amended by adding Section 1305.1511 to read as follows:
Sec. 1305.1511. LIGHTING DESIGN; LICENSE OR REGISTRATION
REQUIRED. (a) A person may not perform or offer to perform
lighting design services unless the person is:
(1) licensed under this chapter;
(2) licensed as an engineer under Chapter 1001; or
(3) registered as an architect, landscape architect,
or interior designer under Subtitle B, Title 6.
(b) In this section, “lighting design services” means the
preparation of plans and specifications that depict the placement
and direction of illumination of mounted or installed lighting
fixtures in the interior or exterior of a building, including the
specification of bulbs, reflectors, lens, louvers, baffles, and
other hardware. The term does not include the preparation of shop
drawings or other directions from a manufacturer for the
installation or operation of lighting fixtures.

6 Comments on Texas Passes Bill Requiring Licensing to Do Lighting Design (updated)

IALD Announces 26th Annual Lighting Design Award Winners

Nineteen winning projects representing projects from 11 countries comprise the winners of the 26th Annual IALD International Lighting Design Awards, out of nearly 260 submissions. Of the 19 projects recognized,…

Nineteen winning projects representing projects from 11 countries comprise the winners of the 26th Annual IALD International Lighting Design Awards, out of nearly 260 submissions. Of the 19 projects recognized, three entries earned Special Citations, 13 earned Awards of Merit and three earned Awards of Excellence.

The IALD Radiance Award for Excellence in Lighting Design went to Speirs & Major Associates, for Entrance & Atrium, 3 More London Riverside in London, UK.

The IALD Radiance Award for Excellence in Lighting Design went to Speirs & Major Associates, for Entrance & Atrium, 3 More London Riverside in London, UK.

The highest point score winner across all categories, in addition to receiving an Award of Excellence for their project, receives The IALD Radiance Award for Excellence in Lighting Design. Speirs & Major Associates received this honor for the second straight year, this time accepted by Mark Major, IALD, for his Entrance & Atrium, 3 More London Riverside in London, UK.

The IALD International Lighting Design Awards program honors lighting design that reaches new heights, moves beyond the ordinary and represents excellence in aesthetic and technical design achievement. Only those projects demonstrating consistent design quality and technical expertise receive award recognition after three straight days of judging. The judges included:

MR. RANDY BURKETT, FIALD, Randy Burkett Lighting Design Inc, St. Louis MO USA
MR. COLIN CRAIG, Adrian Smith+Gordon Gill Architecture, Chicago IL USA
MR. MARK MAJOR, IALD, Speirs & Major Associates, London UK
MS. JANET S. NOLAN, IALD, J.S. Nolan + Associates Lighting Design LLC, San Francisco CA USA
MR. SEAN O’CONNOR, IALD, Sean O’Connor Lighting LLC, Beverly Hills CA USA
MR. THOMAS PATERSON, ASSOC. IALD, Lux Populi, Colonia San Angel Mexico
MR. TRAVIS PENCE, Wilson Group, Charlotte NC USA
2009 IALD DESIGN AWARDS CO-CHAIRS
MS. ANDREA HARTRANFT, IALD, C.M. Kling & Associates, Alexandria, VA USA
MS. DIANE L. RODRIGUEZ, ASSOC. IALD, Indianapolis, IN USA

The IALD will be publishing the rest of the winners on its site soon. Stay tuned here.

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Cooper Lighting Announces SOURCE Awards Call for Entries

Cooper Lighting, a division of Cooper Industries, Ltd., has announced a call for entries for its 33rd Annual SOURCE Awards national lighting design competition. The competition, which focuses on furthering…

Cooper Lighting, a division of Cooper Industries, Ltd., has announced a call for entries for its 33rd Annual SOURCE Awards national lighting design competition.

The competition, which focuses on furthering the understanding, knowledge and function of lighting as a primary element in design, is open to all lighting designers, architects, engineers, professional designers and consultants who use Cooper Lighting products (such as Halo, Metalux, Portfolio, Neo-Ray, Corelite, Sure-Lites, etc.) in an interior or exterior design project. (Students currently enrolled in any of these disciplines are also eligible to enter projects based on conceptual lighting designs utilizing Cooper Lighting luminaires, and are judged in a separate student category.) Projects will be judged on the blending of aesthetics, creative achievement and technical performance and to the degree which the lighting met project constraints and design concept goals. This year’s competition will also seek a creative use of luminaires providing energy-efficient design solutions in addition to standard projects.

cooper

Judging for the 33rd Annual SOURCE Awards competition will take place February 2010. Student winner(s) will receive a crystal trophy and a monetary award ($1,500) and professional winner(s) will also receive a monetary award ($2,000) and a crystal trophy along with local and national recognition. Entries must be postmarked on or before January 29, 2010. Winners will be announced in May 2010.

Click here to download the entry form.

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Benya, Neils, Villatoro and Christensen Win 2008 GE Edison Award

The 2008 GE Edison Award was presented to James R. Benya of Benya Lighting Design, Michael Neils and Juan José Villatoro of M. Neils Engineering, Inc., and James E. Christensen…

The 2008 GE Edison Award was presented to James R. Benya of Benya Lighting Design, Michael Neils and Juan José Villatoro of M. Neils Engineering, Inc., and James E. Christensen of the City of Sacramento, for lighting the Sacramento Memorial Auditorium in Sacramento, California.

ge1

GE Consumer & Industrial presented a personalized Steuben crystal award for the 26th-annual lighting design competition on May 4, 2009 in New York City during Lightfair International. The project also earned an Award for Excellence in Environmental Design. The GE Edison Award competition is open to those lighting professionals who creatively employ significant use of GE light sources (lamps and/or LEDs) in a lighting design project completed during the previous calendar year.

The Sacramento Memorial Auditorium, opened in 1927, is listed on the National Historic Register and has been the home of concerts, inaugurals, commencements and other civic events for 80 years. Excavating the grounds to repair foundation walls provided an opportunity to improve site and building lighting. Because of its importance to the city and state, the design team was asked to develop a lighting design that is significantly better than California Title 24, and that respects nighttime skies.

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The lighting design features several GE ConstantColor CMH ceramic metal halide and GE T5 High Output Ecolux fluorescent lamps. The six columns with ornate capitals and the two end pilasters are each uplighted with one 150W CMH T6 3000K in-grade luminaire. The luminaire location is precisely in the second step so that the column, capital, frieze and cornice are illuminated. Up washers with 54W T5HO 3000K lamps illuminate the pediment wall, and the medallion is highlighted with a 70W CMH narrow spot lamp.

In ceiling coves behind the arches, 70W CMH downlight wallwashers illuminate the wall and doors. The downlights, installed in the same locations as prior luminaires, were approved by the historic commission. The front corners of the building are uplighted with 54W GE T5HO luminaires supplemented by 70W CMH luminaires for the limestone pilasters.

The massive brick building’s largest façades are the east and west. Each is comprised of a series of pilasters with rooflines sloping back. A continuous fluorescent 54W T5HO wallwash luminaire between pilasters connects the composition around the building base. Pilasters are uplighted with asymmetric luminaires with 70W CMH lamps for the middle level and 39W CMH lamps for the top and bottom levels. Luminaire locations were limited by historic preservation requirements. Rather than flood the façade, a design creating a dramatic lantern effect on the top of each pilaster was chosen. Interior lighting for the skylight windows features fluorescent GE 32W T8 3000K lamps.

There are Romeo and Juliet balconies at each of the four main fire exits. Two 70W CMH in-grade floodlights and a single 54W T5HO 3000K up washer in each balcony highlight the balcony and brick wall. The lighting reveals a spectacular artful brick pattern not evident by daylight.

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The lighting design also includes site poles that provide all plaza, street and walkway lighting for the building’s block. Luminaires are fully shielded and employ 150W CMH lamps.

There are a number of key design strategies that qualified the project for an Award for Excellence in Environmental Design. Light sources in the design are limited to two types: ceramic metal halide and 3000K linear fluorescent. Mockups determined the lowest practical wattage for the desired effects. The larger east and west façades are only partially illuminated, leaving extensive areas in artfully chosen shadow. Uplighting each main column with only one luminaire, and carefully aiming to also illuminate the capital, frieze, dentils and cornice, reduce power use in half from the original design concept. The elimination of some other proposed luminaires yields a design that betters California Title 24 limits by 22%. Site and plaza lighting comply with the requirements for LEED Credit SS8 for lighting pollution reduction.

Photos by Douglas A. Salin.

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Light + Design: A Guide to Designing Quality Lighting for People and Buildings

Over the past two years, I had the pleasure of working with an extraordinary group of lighting professionals–Carol Jones, Naomi Miller, Leslie North, Peter Ngai, Dawn DeGrazio, Veda Clark and…

design_guide_cover
Over the past two years, I had the pleasure of working with an extraordinary group of lighting professionals–Carol Jones, Naomi Miller, Leslie North, Peter Ngai, Dawn DeGrazio, Veda Clark and Yukiko Yoshida–on the development of Light + Design: A Guide to Designing Quality Lighting for People and Buildings. This 192-page document is a practical guide to all areas of lighting design, aiming to introduce a wide range of architecture and design professionals to the principles of quality lighting design. I served as the Guide’s editor.

Click here for more information and to order.

2009 – 192 Pages
8 1/2 x 11 Hardcover
ISBN: 978-0-87995-231-0

Product ID: DG-18-08
Price: $95.00
Member Price: $66.50

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Introducing “BUG”: A Classification System for Outdoor Luminaires

The International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) is promoting BUG, a classification system for outdoor luminaires (PDF file). Based on the TM-15–the upgrade of the roadway shielding classification system by the Illuminating…

The International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) is promoting BUG, a classification system for outdoor luminaires (PDF file).

bug

Based on the TM-15–the upgrade of the roadway shielding classification system by the Illuminating Engineering Society and the Lighting Research Center–the BUG system addresses light emitted from the luminaire in all directions, not just up into the sky. Called the BUG system for its measurement of Backlight, Uplight, and Glare, it provides the most comprehensive way of measuring the total lumens emitted by a fixture.

The BUG measuring system works in conjunction with the ecologically rated lighting zones developed in the Model Lighting Ordinance (MLO), jointly created by the IES and IDA.

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New DOE Commercial Lighting Solutions Web Tool Lights the Way Beyond 90.1

I wrote the below column for the April issue of Illuminate, published by Architectural Products Magazine, about the Commercial Lighting Solutions program produced by DOE to support organizations seeking to…

I wrote the below column for the April issue of Illuminate, published by Architectural Products Magazine, about the Commercial Lighting Solutions program produced by DOE to support organizations seeking to generate energy savings beyond ASHRAE 90.1-2004 without sacrificing lighting quality. I was also honored to take part in a charrette in Washington, DC to contribute to the lighting controls component of the software. Its a highly useful piece of software, and worth a drive.

The sustainable design movement encourages energy code compliance, daylighting, individual user control, responsible outdoor lighting and control system commissioning. But it also promotes exceeding energy codes that are already strict, resulting in lighting choices that may be guided more by the energy consumption of buildings than the visual needs of their occupants.

Indeed, the very notion of exceeding an energy code appears to contain inherent risks, even though the LEED green building rating system and even a Presidential executive order mandating upgrades for Federal buildings are all based on this approach. If energy codes are developed based on available technology and IES recommendations for light levels, why push beyond to save energy when doing so might compromise user satisfaction and productivity?

The traditional answer is that it is possible to have good design and very high efficiency largely due to technology that has already leaped ahead when a new code is announced, as these programs simply seek to stimulate demand for existing cutting-edge solutions. This argument is reaching a point of diminishing returns, however, as codes are becoming so restrictive they are beginning to consume cutting-edge technology themselves. To continue going beyond, we’re going to have to rethink codes in terms of energy consumed instead of power installed, wholeheartedly embrace advanced controls, and focus on design instead of just technology.

But does the specification community have the expertise to achieve these goals outside those projects produced by the top designers in the field?

“Achieving high levels of lighting energy efficiency appropriately involves thoughtful design,” says Carol Jones, lighting program manager for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. “Simple approaches, such as replacing T12 with T8 lamps, can achieve meaningful savings, but many building owners and tenants have already taken these steps. To get to the next level of performance, more comprehensive and integrated approaches are needed. But we have a capability challenge. Not enough people know how to do good lighting on a very low energy budget.”

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has taken a different approach with its Commercial Lighting Solutions (CLS) program, a component of Commercial Building Energy Alliances, private-public forums seeking to reduce energy consumption by significant levels in new and existing buildings in their vertical building markets. CLS seeks to stimulate adoption of advanced lighting technologies and design practices by making them available to the broader lighting specification community, not just the leaders in the field.

The result is an extraordinary interactive web tool that enables any lighting decision-maker to save 30% more energy than the ASHRAE 90.1-2004 standard energy code without sacrificing lighting quality that users need from lighting systems. (It’s important to note that CLS is based on saving kWh through design, not kW solely through equipment choices.) Intended users include designers, owners, contractors, distributors and others interested in the latest sustainable, energy-efficient solutions.

DOE has started with the retail market, identifying a range of space types and then engaging expert lighting designers to work with building owners, architects and manufacturers to produce design templates for typical spaces that can be used in new construction and relighting projects. Called “vignettes,” these templates include lighting layouts, controls recommendations, projected demand and energy savings, component specifications and supporting documentation.

cls

This is only the beginning. In the future, the tool will project energy cost savings and link designers to participating utilities, where applicable, to access rebates and other financial incentives for their design. CLS will also expand to include more templates in retail and later reach out to other building categories such as office and institutional buildings.

“CLS is not an ‘intelligent lighting designer’ and is not meant to replace the design process, but instead help lighting specifiers leapfrog the learning curve by providing a spectrum of possibilities for energy-efficient design,” says Jones. “CLS offers these design options based on best practice design principles for those wishing to exceed code without sacrificing quality for efficiency.”

Note that some lighting expertise is needed to understand and implement the design recommendations, and higher expertise will be needed if your project is atypical or has special lighting needs, as CLS was designed to target typical conditions in mainstream construction.

In beta testing over the past few months, CLS version 1.0 for retail buildings is free to the public and is officially launching at Lightfair International in early May. Get it free here.

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Room Surface Brightness

Traditionally, lighting design for office applications has focused on making sure that there are sufficient maintained light levels on horizontal surfaces such as desktops. But research suggests that office workers…

Traditionally, lighting design for office applications has focused on making sure that there are sufficient maintained light levels on horizontal surfaces such as desktops. But research suggests that office workers prefer some light on vertical surfaces, confirming the beliefs of many lighting designers.

Designing lighting to create brightness on vertical surfaces in the field of view offers a number of potential benefits. Brighter vertical surfaces can mitigate glare, perception of glare and shadowing on faces and work surfaces, while making the space appear brighter overall. These benefits are achieved by reflecting diffused light at various angles, effectively using vertical surfaces as part of the overall lighting system’s ability to distribute light in the space. Such lighting conditions communicate that the space has a public and businesslike atmosphere.

One study of task lighting in offices, conducted by National Research Council (NRC) Canada, suggest that office workers prefer to have light on all room surfaces, not just their desks, which may be due to low levels of ambient lighting and high levels of task lighting creating uncomfortable lighting conditions (luminance ratios).

The results further suggest 200-250 lux (20-25 footcandles) as a minimum preferred light level on vertical partitions (note that 400-450 lux, or 40-50 footcandles, is typically recommended for desktops). This is a higher level than current recommended practice.

The higher the reflectance characteristics of the partition, the lower the light level can be. For example, 200 lux (20 footcandles) falling on a light gray vertical partition with a reflectance of about 70% would be considered a suitable minimum.

Although NRC found no link between organizational productivity and vertical surface brightness, it did discover the preference; previous NRC studies have demonstrated that when lighting conditions differ from occupant preferences, there can be a negative impact on comfort and satisfaction.

To achieve room surface brightness, consider lighter-colored partitions, workstation panels, desktops, shelving/cabinets and wall paints. Acoustical ceiling tiles can be specified with a high reflectance. White is naturally a good choice, although a number of pastel colors are available with reflectance values of 70% or greater. In such a space, darker or concentrated colors can be used as accents or for floors and some furniture.

If the ceiling is dark or too cluttered or low for easily distributing light onto it, focus on increasing brightness on the walls with wall sconces, accent lighting or wallwashing.

To study the effect of various light distributions in a typical office space, lighting designers Leslie North, PE, LC, LEED-AP and Carla Bukalski, PE, LC created a sample space, lighted four different ways, using Lightscape lighting design visualization software: lensed troffers (top), downlights, parabolic troffers and linear indirect (bottom). All of these solutions provide a 500-lux (50-footcandle) light level on the desktop, but create very different atmospheres and visual environments. Which space appears most visually comfortable to you? Which appears brightest and most spacious? In which space would you most like to work?

Office lighted by lensed troffers.

Office lighted by lensed troffers.

Office lighted by downlights.

Office lighted by downlights.

Office lighted by parabolic troffers.

Office lighted by parabolic troffers.

Office lighted by linear indirect luminaires.

Office lighted by linear indirect luminaires.

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