Category: Daylighting

Energy Center of Wisconsin to Host Live Daylight and LED Webinar on January 17

Daylighting is the technique of bringing natural light into a space and using it to enhance the space’s visual quality as well as energy performance. LEDs are a dynamic new…

energy center of wisconsinDaylighting is the technique of bringing natural light into a space and using it to enhance the space’s visual quality as well as energy performance. LEDs are a dynamic new technology with tremendous potential. This webinar will touch on the fundamentals of daylighting and LEDs, as well as the best ways to incorporate them into a single lighting system.

Energy Center University, the education arm of the Energy Center of Wisconsin, will host a live webinar, “Daylight Control and Performance Specifications: LEDs and More” on Tuesday, January 17, 2012, from 11 AM–12:30 PM CENTRAL TIME.

PRESENTERS
Scott Schuetter, PE, LEED Green Associate
Energy Center of Wisconsin

Shanna Olson, LC
IBC Engineering Services, Inc.

Holly Blomquist, LEED Green Associate
Harwood Engineering Consultants, Ltd.

Douglas M. Sauer, PE
IBC Engineering Services, Inc.

AUDIENCE
Architects, engineers, lighting and electrical contractors, facility managers, school and healthcare facilities operators, manufacturers, building owners, energy managers, dealers and distributors, lighting designers, interior designers, energy efficiency specialists, commissioning authorities and anyone interested in commercial building design.

CREDITS
You will receive 0.1 Continuing Education Units (1 hour) from IACET for attending this training. This course is currently being reviewed by additional continuing education accreditation organizations. Check the website for up-to-date information.

COST
This webinar is free to view, $89 to take quiz for credit. Registration is required. After registering, you will receive an email confirmation that includes a link to join the webinar.

REGISTER
Click here to register for this event.

CAN’T WATCH IT LIVE?
The webinar will be recorded for convenient on-demand viewing.

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University of Maryland Wins Solar Decathlon 2011

The University of Maryland took first place in the highly competitive Architecture Contest of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011. For the Architecture Contest, collegiate students from around…

The University of Maryland took first place in the highly competitive Architecture Contest of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011. For the Architecture Contest, collegiate students from around the world are judged on the design and construction of attractive, high-performance houses that integrate renewable energy systems and energy-efficient technologies.

Maryland earned a score of 96 out of a possible 100 points. Architectural juror Michelle Kaufmann, who has been called “the Henry Ford of green homes” by the Sierra Club and is a former Associate with the office of Frank O. Gehry, said, “The Maryland home achieves an elegant mix of inspiration, function and simplicity. It takes our current greatest challenges in the built environment – energy and water – and transforms them into opportunities for spatial beauty and poetry while maintaining livability in every square inch. This is what the Department of Energy Solar Decathlon is all about.”

New Zealand (Victoria University of Wellington) claimed second place with 95 points, and Appalachian State University took third place with 94 points.

The Solar Decathlon challenges collegiate teams from around the world to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are affordable, highly energy efficient, attractive, and easy to live in. The competition involves 10 contests that gauge each house’s performance, livability and affordability, and provides unique training that has prepared approximately 15,000 students to become the next generation of innovators and entrepreneurs in clean energy technology and efficient building design.

For the Architecture Contest, the jury evaluated the houses on the following criteria:

· Architectural elements – including the scale and proportion of room and facade features, indoor/outdoor connections, composition, and linking of various house elements.
· Holistic design – an architectural design that will be comfortable for occupants and compatible with the surrounding environment.
· Lighting – the integration and energy efficiency of electrical and natural light.
· Inspiration – a design that inspires and delights Solar Decathlon visitors.
· Documentation – including drawings, a project manual, and an audiovisual architecture presentation that accurately reflect the constructed project on the competition site.



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NBI Offers Daylighting Pattern Guide, Webinar on December 7

The New Buildings Institute recently launched the Daylight Pattern Guide, a free interactive tool that features 19 prime examples in common space configurations, developed by Christopher Meek, AIA, with the…

Webinar on the Daylighting Pattern Guide

The New Buildings Institute recently launched the Daylight Pattern Guide, a free interactive tool that features 19 prime examples in common space configurations, developed by Christopher Meek, AIA, with the University of Washington Integrated Design Lab and Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg of the University of Idaho Integrated Design Lab.

Check it out here.

On December 7, 2011, from 1:00-2:00 PM EST (10-11 AM PST), NBI will host a free webinar that will demonstrate the ways the Daylighting Pattern Guide can support the integration of proven daylighting strategies into commercial building projects.

Click here to register now.

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Take a Video Tour of The Solar Decathlon 2010

Speaking of the 2010 Solar Decathlon, you can check out the projects at the Solar Decathlon website. Here’s the Parsons project. Check out the rest here.

Speaking of the 2010 Solar Decathlon, you can check out the projects at the Solar Decathlon website. Here’s the Parsons project. Check out the rest here.

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New Buildings Institute Launches First Online Advanced Lighting Guide

New Buildings Institute (NBI) has announced the publication of the inaugural online version of the Advanced Lighting Guidelines (ALG). ALG is a premier resource for energy‐efficient lighting design, technologies and…

New Buildings Institute (NBI) has announced the publication of the inaugural online version of the Advanced Lighting Guidelines (ALG). ALG is a premier resource for energy‐efficient lighting design, technologies and applications representing the latest and best thinking of experts in the field (I was pleased to contribute the controls chapter with Dorene Maniccea, and edit several other chapters). It is also the latest addition to NBI’s Advanced Buildings suite of tools and services that help design teams create low‐energy buildings.

Previously offered in book form, the new ALG Online provides lighting professionals the same extensive resource on aspects of energy‐efficient lighting design such as light and vision, daylighting, controls, luminaires and distribution, etc. ALG Online also outlines strategies for specific applications such as retail spaces and includes a directory of luminaires with technical data sheets.

“We’re excited to take Advanced Lighting Guidelines to the next level by making this service available online. This is an important resource for both students and professionals to stay current and learn about new practices in the industry and the latest designs for energy efficiency,” said Barb Hamilton, Lighting Manager for New Buildings Institute.

Advanced Lighting Guidelines was initially produced by the California Energy Commission in 1991 as a means to dispel myths about new and emerging advanced lighting technologies. Since then, ALG has become the premier publication for quality technical guidance from leading experts in the field.

Updated and expanded on a regular basis since its debut in 1991, ALG has enjoyed broad public and private support from organizations such as the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as well as continual rigorous peer review.

Highlights of the online version of ALG:

* Daylighting –for the first time, an entire chapter is devoted to daylighting, describing techniques for incorporating daylighting into design, offering case studies and technical information; and the tool compiles the latest studies about how daylight affects health, comfort and psychological well‐being of building occupants.

* Electric lighting controls – a variety of new technologies have evolved that can help increase energy efficiency – digital strategies, new types of fluorescent lamps and ballasts, and wireless controls are all included.

* Supplemental information – offers expert, quality technical guidance and connects users with related articles and community resources including the Commercial Lighting Solutions.

* Luminaire and Application Directories – provides lighting schemes for common spaces and identifies the highest performing luminaires including Tech Sheets that will help the lighting professional specifying the best performing luminaire of its kind.

Click here to visit the new ALG online.

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Hanley Wood University Offers Five Lighting Courses

Visit Hanley Wood University and check out these five courses related to lighting: * Daylight Harvesting or Controlling Electric Light in Response to Daylight * Introduction to Tubular Daylighting Devices…

Visit Hanley Wood University and check out these five courses related to lighting:

* Daylight Harvesting or Controlling Electric Light in Response to Daylight

* Introduction to Tubular Daylighting Devices

* LED Lighting Education for Specifiers

* Lighting for Learning: Best Practices for Classroom Lighting

* What is the Big Deal with LED Lighting? How can LED Lighting Improve Projects I am Working on Today?

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New Window Technology Shows Promise to Reduce Energy Consumption in Tropical Regions

A new approach to windows that could let in more light and cut indoor lighting needs by up to 99% in buildings in Tropical regions without losing the cooling effect…

A new approach to windows that could let in more light and cut indoor lighting needs by up to 99% in buildings in Tropical regions without losing the cooling effect of shades. Details are reported in the International Journal of Engineering Systems Modelling and Simulation this month.

Lerdlekha Tanachaikhan and colleagues in the School of Environment, Resources and Development, at the Asian Institute of Technology in Pathumtani, Thailand, explain that electric lighting is typically responsible for 25 to 40% of total electricity consumption in air-conditioned buildings. These figures could be reduced significantly they say if daylighting were used instead.

In Tropical regions, however, daylighting leads to a significant rise in temperature, which has to be countered by air-conditioning if the occupants are to remain cool and comfortable. This in turn consumes about 80% of the total electricity consumption for the building.

Earlier studies on daylighting in buildings indicate that window designs and positioning are as diverse as buildings themselves and none currently provides a satisfactory answer to saving on the lighting bills without pumping up the air-conditioning.

The team has developed a formula for tropical sky climate conditions that allows them to assess different window configurations for daylighting. The formula takes into account glass type, solar and visible light transmittance and reflectance, shading coefficient and the heat insulation value, U.

The formula shows that for a city, such as Bangkok, the potential for daylighting is high and could cut daytime electric lighting requirements significantly. The team suggests that for more than 95% of the occupancy period of a typical office building, daylight alone would suffice for lighting with the appropriate window configuration.

This saving would not be reduced significantly even with the use of vertical fins for east-facing windows and horizontal canopies for south-facing windows to reduce heating effects. Daylighting and shading effects can be optimized by following their formula and choosing appropriate windows size and positioning as well as other parameters, such as glazing transmittance.

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Energy Center to Present Energy-Efficient Lighting Design Seminar with Jim Benya

The Energy Center of Wisconsin will host a seminar by lighting designer Jim Benya on how to achieve energy-efficient lighting and daylighting designs that maximize both lighting quality and energy…

The Energy Center of Wisconsin will host a seminar by lighting designer Jim Benya on how to achieve energy-efficient lighting and daylighting designs that maximize both lighting quality and energy efficiency. In this seminar, Benya will examine the latest technologies and strategies to achieve superior lighting design essential for energy efficient and high performance buildings.

WHEN: Wednesday, October 6, 2010, 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM

WHERE: ComEd Commercial Center, Oak Brook, Illinois

AGENDA:
8:00 AM—Registration and Continental breakfast
8:30 AM–4:30 PM—Program

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS: Energy Center University is an authorized provider for the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET). This training is eligible for 0.6 CEUs.

AIA members will receive 6 SD/HSW/LU learning units for attending. This training has been approved by NCQLP for 6 lighting education units. This course has been approved by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) at the 300 level as part of the GBCI Credentialing Maintenance Program.

COST: The registration fee for attending this training is $169, which includes continental breakfast and lunch.

MORE/REGISTER: Click here to learn more and to register.

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Scartezzini and Münch Present Talk on Daylighting (Video)

In this presentation, Jean-Louis Scartezzini and Mirjam Münch, from the Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory at EPFL, present their experiences with daylighting research and technology. Their work illustrates possible…

In this presentation, Jean-Louis Scartezzini and Mirjam Münch, from the Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory at EPFL, present their experiences with daylighting research and technology. Their work illustrates possible integration steps toward optimized “Day and Night” lighting environments with respect to energy consumption and human health.

Marilyne Andersen, associate professor in the Building Technology Program of MIT’s Department of Architecture and head of the Daylighting Lab, also joins the discussion with an overview of her efforts to better integrate energy-efficiency and human-responsiveness to daylighting into architecture and design.

Get it here.

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The Impact of Daylight in the Built Environment

While not an electric light source, daylight is an important layer to consider in a lighting design in any space that has daylight apertures such as windows and skylights. In…

Photo courtesy of Light Louver.

While not an electric light source, daylight is an important layer to consider in a lighting design in any space that has daylight apertures such as windows and skylights. In its simplest definition, daylighting is the use of daylight as the primary source of illumination in a space. Daylighting is also related to providing access to a view, optimizing quality of the visual environment, and reducing whole building energy consumption. When designing a lighting system, one must consider where daylight is allowed to enter the space and in what intensity, how it is controlled, and how the electric lighting and daylighting will be integrated.

Access to a view

An important concept related to daylighting is providing a view. While view windows can be potential sources of glare (that can be addressed with good design and technologies such as micro-blinds), a majority of people want them.

In windowless offices, people tend to experience stress and feelings of being cooped up, feelings that can be alleviated by providing access to a view. Jay Appleton, in The Experience of Landscape (1975), theorized that humans evolved a preference for environments that are safe locations from which they can view and survey the surrounding environment (the prospect-refuge theory). Occasionally viewing distant outside objects relaxes the eye muscles and eases discomfort. People also tend to prefer a connection with nature and a sense of time. In short, they want a view.

In a 2003 Heschong Mahone Group study of 100 workers in a call center, workers with the best possible view (and all other things being equal) processed calls 6-12 percent faster. In a related study of 200 office workers, those with ample view performed 10-25 percent better on a variety of cognitive tests versus workers with no view. Those workers with no view self-reported greater fatigue throughout the workweek. This research suggests that a view can be as valuable as having daylight in a space.

Benefits of daylight

Daylighting can impact people and spaces by providing sensory availability, connection to nature, time/weather information, full-spectrum light, modeling and an indirect component of light producing wall- and ceiling-washing effects, which can provide a more pleasant and comfortable visual environment. Many of these benefits boil down to simple mental stimulation due to moderate changes in the environment, so long as these changes are meaningful and patterned, which research indicates is beneficial to workers in monotonous, uniform office environments.

The impact can be dramatic, as indicated by numerous studies over the past 50 years. Various Heschong Mahone studies, for example, discovered an increase in sales as high as 40 percent in retail stores with skylights versus those without any daylighting, and a 21 percent improvement in learning rates (one study) and 7-18 percent higher test scores (another study) in school classrooms with daylighting.

Fisheye view of daylit classroom at Evergreen State College Childcare Center in Olympia, WA. Balanced daylight from two sides of the space increases probability that a photocontrol system will work well. Photo courtesy of Heschong Mahone Group.

Integration with electric lighting

Daylighting should be controlled to avoid unwanted glare and heat gain. To integrate daylight with the electric lighting, the luminaires should emit light on the same surfaces and in the same direction as the daylight apertures. If daylight is placed on high walls and ceilings, then the electric lighting system should place light on these surfaces as well. In deeper spaces where daylight does not penetrate to the rear areas, consider wall washing on the rear wall to prevent excessive contrasts. To prevent excessive contrasts between daylight apertures and surrounding wall or ceiling, consider lighter finishes and placing light on those surfaces.

Besides distribution, the light source itself should be specified with daylight in mind: Diffuse sources such as fluorescent complement daylight’s diffuse characteristics. Consider cooler (4000K to 6000K) light sources in spaces occupied mainly during the day; if cooler light sources are unwelcome, consider a neutral (3500K to 4100K) source.

Additionally, if daylight is a primary source of illumination, consider adding lighting controls that automatically dim or turn OFF the lights in response to daylight contribution to task light levels. Switching is generally considered more suitable for spaces where users do not perform critical tasks, such as lobbies and atria, while dimming is generally considered more suitable for spaces where they do, such as offices and classrooms. When daylight harvesting control will be employed, the lighting system ideally will be designed so that circuiting aligns with daylight patterns, and enable occupants to adjust or override the automatic control.

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