Month: June 2017

Eaton’s Scott Teschendorf on Trends in Outdoor Area Lighting

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Scott Teschendorf, Market Development Manager, Eaton. The topic: trends in outdoor area lighting. I’m happy to share his responses with you here. The…

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Scott Teschendorf, Market Development Manager, Eaton. The topic: trends in outdoor area lighting. I’m happy to share his responses with you here. The interview informed an article I wrote for the April 2017 issue of tED Magazine.

DiLouie: What are the top trends in the area lighting market?

Teschendorf: We are seeing the market adopting more of the energy codes across the country and subsequently adding some form of controls to their outdoor products. Whether it is something as simple as an occupancy sensor or photocell, up to a fully integrated, multi-functional, programmable wireless solution, the energy savings these products afford make it difficult to not include controls in every conversation.

The industry focus of outdoor luminaire design has been on increased illuminance and improved efficiency. The biggest concern with pedestrian scale LED luminaires is that they present distracting pixilated images and poor visibility.

DiLouie: How are these trends shaping demand for outdoor lighting products?

Teschendorf: Customers are seeing the value in controlling their high-wattage luminaires and the very attractive ROI they are realizing. The ability to conserve energy and reduce their electric bills speaks directly to their bottom line. Because today’s luminaires are highly efficient and performance-based, customers are gaining higher lighting quality at lower operating costs. The fact that some manufacturers can also offer greater visual comfort using newer optical technologies only enhances the overall experience and the demand for these products.

DiLouie: Generally speaking, how are these trends shaping design of outdoor lighting products?

Teschendorf: Projects, whether new installations or retrofit, are requiring integrating controls into the luminaire. The end user doesn’t want the added expense of running control wires back to a relay panel. The luminaires now come with 0-10v dimming drivers onboard, and then are fitted with either a sensor or a node that makes the luminaire a “smart” luminaire. The luminaires must be designed with the ability to accommodate these new controls.

DiLouie: Energy codes are increasingly requiring bilevel control for dusk-to-dawn lighting. How is this affecting demand for controllable outdoor lighting? How much of this is bleeding into the retrofit market?

Teschendorf: Because LEDs are instant-on, instant-off, and dimmable, they lend themselves perfectly to meet these new demands. Not only can the luminaires be bi-level switched, they can now be dimmed further to increase energy savings and increase the lumen maintenance as well. It is much easier to accomplish this in new projects where all of the attributes of LED can be optimized. However, if a customer is looking to replace a luminaire in an existing location, many of these control options can be integrated into the luminaire at the factory without any additional wiring by the contractor. This makes for a very attractive option for the retrofit market.

DiLouie: Several years ago, NEMA introduced a new standard control receptacle allowing new controls to be connected using a standard interface. What opportunities does this create for outdoor lighting? What implications does it have for the retrofit market? What implications does it have for smart cities?

Teschendorf: NEMA’s leadership in doing so provides a platform for the industry to develop around. It creates the ability for innovators to generate new value for customers as solutions reach the marketplace. For the retrofit market, it is one more reason to go ahead and make the switch to LED today. Knowing that your fixture has the ability to adapt or be controlled in the future as the outdoor lighting control industry continues to evolve is important. That is also a key implication for smart cities as municipalities have the flexibility to find new ways to service their citizens as those solutions emerge.

DiLouie: Several years ago, the Model Lighting Ordinance was introduced allowing municipalities to enact sensible outdoor lighting laws. How extensive has adoption been? How have lighting ordinances affected outdoor lighting product design and demand? What implications does it have for the retrofit market?

Teschendorf: The level of adoption has been varied across the country. Most of these requirements are based on the amount of light that escapes the luminaire in some uncontrolled manner. This uncontrolled light can cause light to enter regions where it is unwanted such as light trespass into a neighboring property or into the night sky. Manufacturers that have focused their efforts around optical performance to control this light have been the benefactor of this ordinance. Because the light source of individual diodes is relatively small, some manufacturers are able to capture and control 100 percent of the light being emitted, laying down light in a very precise manner.

DiLouie: Recently, the American Medical Association published guidance to communities installing LED lighting. Notably, that outdoor lighting should feature a warm CCT. What is your view of the guidance? What impact is this having on demand for outdoor lighting? What impact is it having on product development?

Teschendorf: Our director of optical design published a position on this to our informational and educational website, The Lighting reSOURCE (http://thelightingresource.eaton.com/features/2016/ama-report-on-led-community-lighting). In short, we believe that our customers need to evaluate a wide range of factors including light distribution, energy efficiency, recommended light levels and more in selecting the appropriate product. For customers who choose to prioritize the AMA’s guidance, Eaton have products available to meet that. In fact, most of our LEDs products already do meet their recommendations around being controllable, preventing light trespass and minimizing glare. Because of this, it has actually had little impact on product development aside from creating the possibility of a shift to more 3000K LEDs in our supply chain.

DiLouie: What protocols are used for wireless communication for outdoor lighting? What the pros and cons of each?

Teschendorf: The protocols in outdoor wireless communication seem to be growing seemingly by the day as private interests, industry groups and standards organizations all jockey for position to become an established market leader. We most commonly see ZigBee-based installations in the current market with the pros of growing market scale and improved functionality. Cons are the bandwidth and range limitations. Bluetooth, WiFi, Cellular, LPWAN/LoRa and others are worth monitoring as use cases will vary significantly enough to leverage different benefits in all of them. It is unlikely that one protocol emerges over the next five years for all use cases in the outdoor lighting industry.

DiLouie: There’s a lot for electrical distributors to navigate when it comes to outdoor lighting. When recommending a solution, what should distributors be looking for?
First, look to partner with a reputable lighting company. Look for a company that can offer full integrated solutions. There hasn’t been standardization in the controls arena to date and subsequently not all controls are compatible with all luminaires. Many distributors recognize this area of the business and have hired and trained an on-staff lighting professional to assist in the area.

Teschendorf: Second, understand the needs of the customer. Some customers may need a simple occupancy sensor that raises the light levels when someone is present and then reduces it again after a period of time. Others may want to have the flexibility to have either individual luminaire control or zonal control with the ability to push various lighting profiles out to the luminaires on the site. They may want to meter and/or monitor that site at any given time. Knowing how the customer plans to use the site will determine the amount of control they will require.

DiLouie: What can distributors do to ensure they are most competitive in the outdoor lighting market?

Teschendorf: Know how to compare various luminaires from various manufacturers. Don’t just look at comparable lumen packages but look at where those lumens are going and how they illuminate the project site. Some manufacturers are very good at doing “more with less” by the way they control the lumens exiting the luminaire. Many times by looking at the complete project, customers can reduce the overall amount of luminaires on a site by using a better luminaire. Some luminaires may be less expensive per unit but find they need more luminaires on the project to achieve the desired light levels.

Stay educated on the codes in their region – Title 24, ASHRE, etc. Know which products can be used to achieve the desired light levels, performance requirements and know the controls that are available. Manufacturers offer courses and resources to keep the distributors up to speed on products and trends. Reach out to your local lighting agent and request a training session.

DiLouie: If you could tell all electrical distributors just one thing about today’s market for LED outdoor lighting, what would it be?

Teschendorf: Don’t wait! LEDs have been lighting the outdoors for 10 years now and have been a proven light source in thousands of projects across the globe. Because LEDs have the ability to dim, be controlled and perform at high levels, they are a natural fit in order to adapt to the new codes that are here. We are really only scratching the surface at the possibilities of what controlled lighting can bring to the outdoor space. Controls will allow many more value propositions to be addressed than just the physical light itself.

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Troffers: Retrofit or Replace?

Below is my contribution to the May issue of tED Magazine. Reprinted with permission. More than 360 million troffers provide general lighting in commercial buildings, according to the U.S. Department…

Below is my contribution to the May issue of tED Magazine. Reprinted with permission.

More than 360 million troffers provide general lighting in commercial buildings, according to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Fluorescent remains the most predominant light source. The development of LED lighting, however, has created a major retrofit opportunity.

“At a base level, retrofit kits provide a simple way to retain existing light fixtures while minimizing expenses and providing longer life than traditional lighting,” said Eric Marsh, Product Portfolio Manager, Cree, Inc. (www.CreeLighting.com). “The next option is a full fixture replacement, in which the fluorescent troffer and pan are changed altogether for a brand-new LED troffer.”

Switching to LED can generate high energy savings, reduced maintenance costs, instant ON at cold temperatures, and controllability. This article evaluates the major options: replacement lamps/retrofit kits and new luminaires.

TLEDs

Tubular LED replacement lamps, or TLEDs, offer direct replacement of fluorescent lamps in existing luminaires. The lamp incorporates LEDs, optics and heat sinking into a single ready-to-install unit. The majority are bi-pin-based T8 products designed to replace 2-ft., 4-ft. and U-bend T8 and T12 lamps. Some products are also available to replace T5 and T5HO lamps.

“TLEDs can generate energy savings in the 40 percent range when paired with a traditional fluorescent ballast and additional energy savings when paired with a dedicated LED driver,” said Jon Zelinsky, PE, Contractor Marketing Director, Philips Lighting. “Retrofit kits can drive energy savings in the 50-75 percent range.”

The DesignLights Consortium (DLC) maintains the Qualified Products List (QPL), identifying TLED products that satisfy performance criteria updated in 2016. DLC requires a minimum efficacy of at least 110 lumens/W as a bare lamp and at least 100 lumens/W as tested in a typical luminaire. (In comparison, a bare fluorescent lamp has an efficacy of about 100 lumens/W). Many utilities rely on the QPL to qualify eligibility for their rebate programs. According to rebate management firm BriteSwitch, the average rebate for a TLED is $6.84 in 2017, with rebate funding in decline as costs decline.

One indicator of TLED’s steady adoption is the Linear Fluorescent Lamp Index, which is based on sales by members of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA). NEMA estimated that in Q32016, TLED lamps accounted for nearly 13 percent of fluorescent lamp shipments.

TLED lamps are categorized as three major types:

• UL Type A: The lamp operates on a fluorescent ballast. Pros: This “drop in” lamp provides simple installation and, if appropriately listed, does not change the safety certification of the luminaire. Cons: Lower efficacy due to ballast losses, and the TLED lamp must be compatible with the ballast, which remains a point of failure.
• UL Type B: The lamp is powered by an internal driver, which allows it to bypass the ballast. Line voltage wires to the lamp sockets. Pro: Little rewiring, as the installer removes the ballast and rewires the sockets. Con: It requires electrical modifications and proper labeling to ensure fluorescent lamps are not installed in the modified sockets.
• UL Type C: The lamp bypasses the ballast and operates with an external driver, which connects to the sockets using low-voltage wiring. Components should be packaged in a UL-classified kit. Pros: High efficacy, multilamp driver operation, greater control capabilities. Con: The most labor-intensive option.

With each option, the installer may need to replace the existing lampholders to support the heavier TLED lamp. In February 2017, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) revised two lighting industry standards to include G6.6 lamp bases and holders. This provides a new connector system specifically designed to hold and power TLED lamps across a wide range of voltages. The base includes two internal power pins and an additional ground pin that mates to the compatible lampholder.

“If you are trying to maintain your current look in a space, are looking for a fast and easy installation, have budget restrictions, or are spot relamping in a massive building, TLED lamps are a great option,” said Alfred LaSpina, LED Product Group Marketing Manager, LEDVANCE (www.Sylvania.com). “LED lamps are now being produced with optimized glass optics that mimics the light distribution and look of traditional lamps.”

Image courtesy of Philips.

Retrofit or replace?

LED troffers and panels offer a fresh alternative to retrofitting existing luminaires. Among the more than 7,300 LED troffer/grid ceiling luminaires listed in the DOE Lighting Facts database in December 2016, the majority produced comparable light output as their fluorescent counterparts, but at a higher efficacy. About one out of 10 listed products operated at an efficacy of 125 lumens/W, in fact, identifying the product as DLC Premium. That efficacy is generally lower than TLED bare lamps but at the high end of TLED efficacy when accounting for TLED light losses when operating within a luminaire. It translates to up to 70 percent energy savings compared to standard fluorescent troffers, which can be accelerated with controls.

LED luminaires are purpose-built for the light source’s unique characteristics, potentially resulting in higher-efficacy quality lighting with a modern aesthetic. However, luminaire replacement typically poses a higher cost than replacing the lamps with TLEDs.

A third option is a retrofit kit, which packages the lamp or a light engine assembly with optics and electrical components to produce a repeatable solution. By incorporating optics, retrofit kits can improve light distribution and aesthetics while expanding control options, achieving a solution close to a new luminaire. Retrofit kits offer a middle-of-the-road option in terms of cost and lighting quality.

Below are several considerations for selecting an option that is optimal for a given application.

Existing conditions. TLED lamps and retrofit kits lend themselves better to applications where the existing luminaires are relatively new and in good condition, and/or where working above the ceiling is prohibitive. New luminaires and retrofit kits lend themselves well to applications where the luminaires are older and showing wear and tear.

Number of lamps. “Troffers may have any number of lamps—one, two, three, four—so one would have to consider the number of lamps and ballasts that an owner has,” Zelinsky said. “A four-lamp and two-ballast fixture may be more expensive to replace individual components instead of putting in an LED retrofit kit or new luminaire.”

Compatibility with ballasts. “One potential disadvantage of replacing fluorescent lamps with LED lamps instead of replacing the luminaire is ballast compatibility,” LaSpina said. “Working with a lighting manufacturer that provides an extensive ballast compatibility list for their TLEDs will ensure you have lamps that work with existing ballasts.”

“Additionally, it is worthwhile to consider the age or expected remaining life of the ballast in the fixture,” Zelinsky said. “A ballast that may need to be replaced in the near term anyway would wind up adding labor costs.”

Light level and distribution. The new lighting must satisfy the application’s maintained light level requirements. Lower-output lamps and luminaires are available for spaces that are overlighted. Alternately, the space could be redesigned for fewer luminaires. In applications requiring uniformity, light level must be evenly distributed across the workplane. TLED lamps are directional (some with light emission as narrow as 105 degrees) while fluorescent lamps are omnidirectional, which may result in dark spots between installed luminaires. While energy is important, the designer should ensure at a minimum that the new lighting maintains existing lighting quality in terms of light level, uniformity and glare.

Space appearance. “A full fixture replacement is ideal for projects in which the goal is to transform the space,” said Jeff Hungarter, Senior Manager, Product Marketing, Cree, Inc. “Replacing the luminaire enhances the look of the ceiling to be modern and up to date. Other benefits include efficacy performance enhancements, improved dimming and control systems, better light quality and longer warranty.”

If the owner rules out new luminaires, Cree’s Marsh advised retrofit kits over TLED lamps. “A retrofit kit basically looks like an entirely new LED troffer in the space, providing a fresh new look,” he said. “At this point, it’s hard to think of a situation where TLED lamps make much sense.”

Lighting controls. “It’s always a good idea to make sure that you are taking the opportunity to include controls as part of the retrofit,” said Ethan Biery, LED Engineering Leader, Lutron Electronics. “Controls can significantly increase the flexibility and comfort of space lighting, and in all cases, control will increase energy savings.”

The ultimate option, he pointed out, is new dimmable luminaires with high-quality drivers, combined with an integrated intelligent lighting control system that provides robust control capabilities. The next level would be dimmable retrofit kits with compatible controls. If TLED lamps will be installed, the first step is to ensure compatibility with the existing controls, if present. He advises against pairing a UL Type A TLED retrofit with existing fluorescent dimming ballasts. In Biery’s view, TLED retrofits are ideal for applications requiring only switching and that will never require dimming.

“No matter which option is chosen, the same concerns with control of all LED fixtures apply: ensuring compatibility and good dimming performance with any control system being used,” he added. “Poor performance can result if you choose a seemingly quick, lowest-cost TLED lamp retrofit.”

Final word

“Know the goals of your customer,” LaSpina advised. “Are their main priorities energy savings, a new look for the space, or ROI options and total cost of ownership at end of life? This will help you pick the right solution for the application. If you tie it to utility rebates, it is even better for the customer.”

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IALD Announces Winners of 34th Annual IALD Awards

The 34th Annual International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD) International Lighting Design Awards recognized 22 projects from eight countries and including interiors, monuments, façades, museums and a residence. This year’s…

The 34th Annual International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD) International Lighting Design Awards recognized 22 projects from eight countries and including interiors, monuments, façades, museums and a residence. This year’s winners represent some of the most innovative and inspiring work found anywhere in the world of architectural lighting design.

The highest point score winner across all categories, in addition to receiving an Award of Excellence for their project, receives the IALD Radiance Award for Excellence in Lighting Design. Accepting the Radiance Award for Excellence in Lighting Design was Dongning Wang, IALD, part of the project team from Beijing United Artists Lighting Design for the Harbin Opera House in Harbin, China. Below are several images from this stunning project:

Of the 22 projects recognized, three entries earned Special Citations, fourteen earned Awards of Merit and five earned Awards of Excellence.

Click here to learn more about the winning projects.

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NAILD Unveils Lighting Training

The National Association of Innovative Lighting Distributors (NAILD) recently launched a new training program through its redesigned Lighting Specialist (LS II) program, which a choice of market specialties including retail,…

The National Association of Innovative Lighting Distributors (NAILD) recently launched a new training program through its redesigned Lighting Specialist (LS II) program, which a choice of market specialties including retail, industrial, office and educational facilities.

The self-paced, online LS II program includes five modules that all registrants must complete, followed by a choice of market specialty. A participant may choose to complete all four market segments and receive an LS II certificate or complete a single market specialty to earn either an LS R, LS IL, LS O or LS E certification.

The course includes workbook exercises, practical activities, field trips, quizzes and a final exam. Participants are encouraged to work closely with a coach. The market-specific portion includes creating a proposal for a client, with topics such as evaluation, schematic design and development, financial analysis and contract and bidding.

Click here to learn more.

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Product Monday: Circus by Resident

Released at Milan 2017, New Zealand-based Resident Studio’s Circus is a system of interconnected rings, which can be arranged in sequence to create a theatrical and flexible visual and illumination…

Released at Milan 2017, New Zealand-based Resident Studio’s Circus is a system of interconnected rings, which can be arranged in sequence to create a theatrical and flexible visual and illumination element. Each brass ring emits diffused warm light outwards around a 360-degree plane.

Click here to learn more.


Circus Light by Resident Studio from Resident Ltd on Vimeo.

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DOE Publishes LIGHTFAIR International Presentations

At LIGHTFAIR 2017 in Philadelphia, DOE once again hosted an informational booth that offered free educational sessions to attendees. DOE has now made these presentations available for free download. They…

At LIGHTFAIR 2017 in Philadelphia, DOE once again hosted an informational booth that offered free educational sessions to attendees.

DOE has now made these presentations available for free download. They include:

Connected Lighting Systems Efforts
Michael Poplawski, PNNL

NGLS Competition One: Installation and Configuration Evaluations
Ruth Taylor, PNNL

There’s Something About Red: Applying TM-30 in Your Practice
Naomi Miller, PNNL

Many Shades of White: DOE SSL Explorations into Color Tuning
Andrea Wilkerson, PNNL

A Case of the Blues: Research Reveals Why Spectrum Alone is Not Enough
Bruce Kinzey, PNNL

Download them here.

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New Lighting Standard Outlines How to Designate LED Direct Replacement Lamps

ANSI Accredited Standards Committee C78, Electric Lamps, recently published ANSI C78.52-2017 American National Standard for Electric Lamps—LED (Light Emitting Diode) Direct Replacement Lamps—Method of Designation. The National Electrical Manufacturers Association…

ANSI Accredited Standards Committee C78, Electric Lamps, recently published ANSI C78.52-2017 American National Standard for Electric Lamps—LED (Light Emitting Diode) Direct Replacement Lamps—Method of Designation. The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) serves as secretariat for the standard.

ANSI C78.52 is a new lighting standard on how to designate LED lamps that are direct replacements for existing, ANSI-standardized, non-LED lamps. Lamps covered in this standard contain LED-based light sources.

Andrew Jackson, Manager, Corporate Regulatory & Certification Laboratory, Chair of the ANSI C78 Committee: “This new standard also provides an LED Direct Replacement Lamp Code Designation Request Form.” This form allows a manufacturer to request a direct replacement designation using lamp characteristic data.

ANSI C78.52-2017 can be purchased for $350 in hard copy or as an electronic download on the NEMA website. Click here to learn more.

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Classroom Lighting 101

Below is an application story I wrote for the May issue of tED Magazine. Reprinted with permission. As of November 2016, put-in-place construction spending in the United States reached $82…

Below is an application story I wrote for the May issue of tED Magazine. Reprinted with permission.

As of November 2016, put-in-place construction spending in the United States reached $82 billion, a 6.3-percent increase over 2015. After power and highway and street construction, educational facilities are the largest construction market in the country.

Today, nearly 55 million students attend school in some 130,000 K-12 buildings in the United States. Arguably, the most important room in these buildings is the classroom, where the majority of instruction occurs.

General-purpose classrooms typically serve 20 to 75 students and are at least 350 sq.ft. In regards to education technology, many modern classrooms bear little resemblance to those used to teach previous generations. A large number of classrooms now use computers, mobile devices and interactive whiteboards as instructional tools.

This article discusses lighting and control for K-12 general-purpose classrooms based on three sources: ANSI/IES RP-3-13, American National Standard Practice on Lighting for Educational Facilities, 2014 national Collaborative for High-Performance Schools (CHPS) criteria (a points-based design rating system), and the 2010/2013 ASHRAE/IES 90.1 energy standards.

General lighting

The primary lighting layers in a classroom are general and supplemental lighting.

For general lighting, RP-3 recommends uniform lighting on horizontal task surfaces, which provides task layout flexibility while promoting alertness and visual acuity. Light levels should satisfy Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) recommendations. Design light levels depend on factors such as the luminaires’ placement, output and distribution as well as the room dimensions and surface reflectances. Recommended surface finish reflectances are 90 percent ceiling, 80 percent window, 70 percent whiteboard, 5-20 percent chalkboard, 60 percent wall, 25-40 percent task surface, and as light as practical for the floor.

The general lighting typically may be segmented into two zones, one for the educator and one for the students. The educator zone focuses on light on vertical surfaces (teaching wall), and the student zone focuses on light on horizontal surfaces (desktops). The designer must take care to avoid glare—reflections on computer screens and whiteboards and direct glare for the educator—which can be challenging with lower ceiling heights.

Daylight is a valuable source of light for general lighting in classrooms. Ideally, students will be seated with sightlines parallel to windows. The daylight entering the space should be controlled with accessories such as windows or blinds. CHPS imposes significant daylight requirements.

Luminaires may emit direct or indirect light distribution or a combination of both, such as direct/indirect. With a direct/indirect luminaire, the direct emission places light on the task and produces some shadowing for modeling. The indirect emission, meanwhile, provides soft, diffused ambient lighting that may be more visually comfortable and produce less reflection on computer screens, which may be tilted back.

The designer may add supplemental lighting to the educator zone. This lighting may be part of the general lighting or dedicated lighting such as a whiteboard luminaire. Its purpose is to raise vertical light levels on the education surface such as a whiteboard or across the entire educator zone. In the latter case, it also draws attention to and effectively models the educator.

Available equipment is constrained by energy codes, which limit interior lighting with a power allowance expressed in maximum W/sq.ft. ASHRAE/IES 90.1-2010 imposes a maximum allowable lighting power density of 0.99W/sq.ft. for school and university buildings if using the Building Area Method and 1.24W/sq.ft. for classrooms if using the Space by Space Method.

For commercial building applications where color rendering is important but not critical, a color rendering index (CRI) rating of 80+ is typically recommended. CHPS requires either a minimum of 80 or 85 CRI, depending on the selected points package.

CHPS options further require luminaires be RoHS compliant, have an L70 of 50,000 or 100,000 hours if LED, operate with an initial efficacy of at least 50 lumens/W, and/or produce a Percent Flicker that is 10 percent or less across the dimming range. For specific requirements that relate to different points packages, consult the CHPS criteria applicable to your project.

Flexibility

The large-scale introduction of projected images in general-purpose classrooms demands flexibility from the lighting system to produce optimal viewing conditions. RP-3 recommends controls that reduce or turn OFF during audiovisual (AV) presentations, with dimming being desirable for presentations using video and computer projection systems.

The lighting should be capable of at least two scenes, General (normal) and AV (multimedia) instruction. In the General mode, the lighting places 20-40 footcandles on desktops. In the AV mode, 5 footcandles, while limiting vertical light levels to 3 footcandles on the whiteboard or projection screen and 7-15 footcandles on the surrounding teaching wall.

CHPS encourages flexible controls by offering up to four points. For two points, the designer must provide indirect/direct lighting for all general-purpose classrooms. Control enables a choice of General or AV (10-30 footcandles in the student zone, maximum 7 on the screen) modes. Separate control must be provided for whiteboard vertical lighting. Where daylight-responsive controls are present, the light sensor takes precedence over manual dimming for the upper light level limit.

For two additional CHPS points, the designer can specify enhanced teacher controls, which provide teacher control at the front of the classroom for General/AV mode, whiteboard control and a manual override of the occupancy sensor time delay during written exams. The occupancy sensor signal in turn must be linked to a school-wide management system.

Tunable-white lighting allows deployment of another emerging dimension of control, which is correlated color temperature (CCT) tuning by activity or time of day. CCT tuning may be combined with intensity control to enable additional lighting modes throughout the day, such as “focus” (high intensity and cool shade of white light) for test taking, and “calm” (standard intensity and warm shade) to help calm an excited class.

Automatic controls

ASHRAE/IES 90.1-2010 and -2013 require manual control, occupancy sensing and daylight-responsive controls. Many commercial building energy codes are based on these standards or the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC).

At a minimum, the occupancy sensor must automatically turn the lights OFF within 30 minutes of the space being vacated. If the sensor automatically turns the lights ON, it must activate the lights to 50 percent or less of lighting power (bilevel switching).

For manual control, one or more manual switches must be installed at the entrance to control all lighting in the room. Additional manual controls may be installed as needed to support visual needs through flexibility.

Daylight-responsive controls must be installed where daylight is present through either sidelighting or toplighting. The output may be bilevel switching, step dimming or continuous dimming.

Learning with light

Lighting practice for educational facilities is changing alongside the teaching environment and its needs. Manufacturers have experience and offerings optimized for this market, and are therefore an excellent resource. To learn more about recommended practice, consult RP-3 published by the IES. To learn more about CHPS, download the applicable CHPS criteria at CHPS.net. To learn more about energy code requirements, consult the energy code in effect in the project’s jurisdiction.

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Study Documents Major Job Growth from 179D Tax Deduction

As many as 77,000 new design and construction jobs would be created annually over 10 years–along with almost $7.4 billion more in annual GDP–if Congress and the Administration continue an…

As many as 77,000 new design and construction jobs would be created annually over 10 years–along with almost $7.4 billion more in annual GDP–if Congress and the Administration continue an important energy efficiency tax policy, according to an economic impact study by Regional Economic Models Inc. (REMI).

Section 179D of the tax code, also known as the Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Deduction, allows qualifying building owners and businesses to receive up to a $1.80 per square foot tax deduction for certain energy efficient improvements placed into service during all open tax years. It was originally passed by Congress as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 in direct response to broader energy usage and independence concerns.

The REMI study documents job creation and GDP growth under three scenarios that continue energy efficiency tax policies:

· Modernizing Section 179D, including increasing the deduction to $3 per square foot and making certain other reforms to strengthen it, generates significant job creation – on average 76,529 per year during its first decade.

· A long-term extension of the deduction at its current $1.80 per square foot level creates an average of almost 41,000 jobs per year over 10 years.

· A long-term extension at $1.80 per square foot, extension of the deduction to hospitals, schools, and other non-profits and to tribal community facilities, and an increase in the energy efficiency requirements creates almost 40,000 jobs per year over the next decade.

The economic growth and job creation generated by a modernized Section 179D would result in a striking GDP return of ten to one when considering the cost of the tax policy, the study finds.

The study was co-funded by the American Institute of Architects (AIA), along with Alliant Group LP, Ameresco, Blue Energy Group, Concord Energy Strategies, Energy Tax Savers, Energy Systems Group, National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and the United States Green Building Council (USGBC).

Click here to see the full study.

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Product Monday: Directional Luminaires by Soraa

Soraa now offers directional luminaires under the Soraa Arc family. The offering includes track, pendant, downlight and surface-mounted designs as well as with luminaire SNAP accessories including trims, Snoot and…

Soraa now offers directional luminaires under the Soraa Arc family. The offering includes track, pendant, downlight and surface-mounted designs as well as with luminaire SNAP accessories including trims, Snoot and wall washes in a variety of colors. Color temperatures include 2700K, 3000K and 4000K. All Arc luminaires feature Soraa VIVID COB light engines with full spectrum 95 CRI, R9 > 95 and Rw 100 typical. Black and white finishes are standard; custom colors are available on request. Arc luminaires with 9°, 10° and 15° beam spreads are also compatible with the existing Soraa SNAP SYSTEM to further customize beam and light color.

Arc products are available for order and begin shipping in early July 2017. Click here to learn more.

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