Month: March 2013

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Publishes Article on Light Right Survey Tool

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR recently published a lighting column I authored on the topic of the Light Right Survey Tool, available here. Developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, it enables building…

ecmagELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR recently published a lighting column I authored on the topic of the Light Right Survey Tool, available here.

Developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, it enables building owners/managers and lighting practitioners to inventory and evaluate lighting systems in office spaces.

Available free, the Light Right Survey Tool can be used:

• As a diagnostic tool to determine if any changes could be made to a lighting system to increase user satisfaction


• As a way to measure the effectiveness of various lighting improvements


• To identify equipment and design choices that produce higher levels of lighting satisfaction


• To increase communication between lighting decision-makers and those who actually use the lighting


• As a way to justify appropriate lighting investments to the owner of the lighting system


Read it here.

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Meyda Seeks Engineer

Career Opportunity with Meyda Custom Lighting: Meyda seeks a “Mechanical Engineer” with solid experience in the lighting industry. Adept at creating shop drawings and engineering specs for a wide variety…

Career Opportunity with Meyda Custom Lighting:

Meyda seeks a “Mechanical Engineer” with solid experience in the lighting industry. Adept at creating shop drawings and engineering specs for a wide variety of decorative lighting fixtures. Strong knowledge of materials including metals, glass and acrylics, as well as lighting sources ranging from incandescent to LEDs.

Contact Meyda Custom Lighting, 1.800.222.4009 x257. Email: CFCohen@meyda.com.

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Electroindustry Business Confidence Surges in February

The Electroindustry Business Confidence Index (EBCI) for current North American conditions, based on a survey of senior industry executives from members of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), climbed to…

The Electroindustry Business Confidence Index (EBCI) for current North American conditions, based on a survey of senior industry executives from members of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), climbed to 69.6 points in February, up six points from 63.6 points in January. The index has topped 60 points in each of the last four months, indicating sustained improvement in the economic environment facing the electrical industry.

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LRC Announces LED Lighting Institute May 14-17, 2013

The next LRC LED Lighting Institute will be held May 14-17, 2013 at the Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street, Troy, NY, 12180. This is a four-day,…

The next LRC LED Lighting Institute will be held May 14-17, 2013 at the Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street, Troy, NY, 12180.

This is a four-day, hands-on seminar to teach industry professionals how to incorporate light-emitting diodes (LEDs) into lighting applications. The LED Lighting Institute will include updated technical content based on the latest industry developments, including OLED technologies.

Learn more here.

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DOE to Host Webcast Highlighting Indoor SSL Applications on April 4, 2013

On Thursday, April 4, from 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM Eastern Time, the Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) will host a webcast, “Solid-State Lighting: Highlighting Indoor Applications.”…

On Thursday, April 4, from 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM Eastern Time, the Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) will host a webcast, “Solid-State Lighting: Highlighting Indoor Applications.” The webcast is part of FEMP’s First Thursday Seminars series, which provides training for Federal energy and environmental professionals.

Presented by Naomi Miller and Jeff McCullough of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the webcast will highlight new LED lighting developments with an emphasis on troffer applications. Participants will learn about best practices to upgrade existing and install new lighting, as well as Federal priorities and tools and resources for success.

Click here to register or to learn more.

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Product Monday: Asymmetric LED Indirect Lighting Solutions by Cooper Lighting

Cooper Lighting, Ametrix Asyx, a series of LED asymmetric luminaires featuring the company’s LightBAR technology and patented AccuLED Optics system for precise optical control, is available in pendant and wall…

Cooper Lighting, Ametrix Asyx, a series of LED asymmetric luminaires featuring the company’s LightBAR technology and patented AccuLED Optics system for precise optical control, is available in pendant and wall configurations for both indirect general illumination and highlighting architectural features. These 70W luminaires deliver 6,000 lumens, operating at an efficacy of 86 lumens/W, and are available in 3000K (80 CRI) and 4000K (70 CRI) CCT with a rated life of 50,000 hours. The Ametrix Asyx series features a sleek, minimal profile available in two housing designs, including the classic wedge shape (Asyx-WL) and the slim tray shape (Asyx-TL). The Asyx luminaire’s mounting options include wall mount, single pendant and dual pendant.

CooperLtg_Ametrix_Asyx

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Oldenburg Group Receives LEED Certification for New Technical Center

Oldenburg Group Incorporated recently announced it has received the LEED Certified designation from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) for its Technical Center built in Kingsford, Michigan. Lighting for the…

LEED Cert 01 2013Oldenburg Group Incorporated recently announced it has received the LEED Certified designation from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) for its Technical Center built in Kingsford, Michigan. Lighting for the project was provided by the company’s Milwaukee-based Visa Lighting.

The Technical Center is a build-to-suit office facility for the Oldenburg Group’s Defense and Energy segments located in Kingsford, Michigan. The 22,500 sq.ft. building is a two-story structure located on a bluff overlooking the Menominee River. Most of the building is faced with translucent glass to maximize daylight and views in occupied spaces. Sustainable elements in the building include energy efficient mechanical and electrical systems, improved air quality, daylighting and sustainable finishes.

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The Color Red for a Good Night’s Sleep?

Guest post by the New Buildings Institute Researchers continue to broaden their knowledge about the ways light impacts the circadian system and rhythms such as the sleep/wake cycle. Generally, it’s…

Guest post by the New Buildings Institute

Researchers continue to broaden their knowledge about the ways light impacts the circadian system and rhythms such as the sleep/wake cycle. Generally, it’s been shown that exposure to strong light levels during daytime hours makes us more alert and focused through the day, while minimal light exposure in bedrooms at night leads to deeper, more restful sleep. Disruption to the circadian system brings with it a multitude of negative impacts on health, particularly in the elderly. Daylight patterns in particular are known to reinforce healthy circadian rhythms, but questions have remained as to the characteristics of artificial light in achieving similar results. A recent post-occupancy study at a healthcare center in New York shows how an experimental lighting upgrade design that emphasizes white light during the day and red light at night has improved resident well-being.

Sisters of St. Francis Health Center, New York Image Credit: LD+A

Sisters of St. Francis Health Center, New York Image Credit: LD+A

The results of the study were outlined in LD+A’s October 2012 article, “Maximizing Health and Sleep in the Elderly.” The study was conducted as part of a capital improvement project upgrading single-lamp and two-lamp corridor luminaires. Employing current photobiology research, the design team initially aimed to limit exposure to blue wavelengths (and artificial lighting) from the corridors at night. This wasn’t feasible due to the nature of the facility, where nurses needed to be able to safely navigate between rooms at all hours. The introduction of red night lighting proved to prevent sleep disturbances associated with the opening and closing of doors onto the corridor. As a result, improvements were noted in the areas of sleep, health and behavior. For sleep this included sleeping through the night, longer waking time during the day, and reduced insomnia.

Health improvements included “Lower incidence of illness (flu, colds)” and “Sustained reduction and stabilization of systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings.” Cited benefits to behavior included “lower incidence of night wandering,” “hallucinations ceased,” “aggression diminished,” “improved lucidity,” and “increased social participation.”

To learn more, visit ALG Online’s Health & Performance chapter which describes the ways in which light impacts visual performance, human health, mood, behavior and productivity. In addition to the circadian system, the human health section explores topics from eyestrain and flicker to well-being and lighting for the elderly.

(Accessing the ALG requires paying a subscription fee.)

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DOE Releases GATEWAY Report on LED Post-Top Lighting

The Department of Energy recently published the evaluation report from a GATEWAY demonstration in New York City’s Central Park, conducted in collaboration with The Climate Group and the New York…

gateway_central_parkThe Department of Energy recently published the evaluation report from a GATEWAY demonstration in New York City’s Central Park, conducted in collaboration with The Climate Group and the New York City Department of Transportation. LED post-top luminaires from five different manufacturers were installed along paved walking trails and evaluated against the metal halide luminaires that were in the park at the time. The report includes product comparisons across performance criteria of energy savings, improved horizontal and vertical illuminance, life-cycle cost, and simple payback, as well as considerations regarding orientation, spacing, and color quality.

Key findings include:

* All of the LED products evaluated provided significant energy reductions relative to the metal halide baseline, ranging from 50% to 83% energy savings.
* Four of the LED products offered lower life-cycle costs than the incumbent luminaire based on an analysis period of 75,000 operating hours.
* For walkways in general, both horizontal and vertical illuminance values are important. The LED products provided a larger percentage of their output as downlight—because of the directional nature of LEDs and better optical control offered by the smaller emitters—and produced considerably less uplight than the baseline. This difference partially explains how some of the LED products produced higher measured illuminance values even with lower overall output.
* Proper orientation of directional luminaires can be a challenge. With an objective to focus illuminance on the pathway versus the surrounding grassy areas, this evaluation considered both symmetric and asymmetric distributions, but a strictly asymmetric approach would not necessarily work for all sites.

Download the report here.

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Roadway Lighting Web Seminar to be Held April 2, 2013

Newspapers are filled with stories describing reductions and removal of street lighting in order to reduce municipal costs. Tackling the tricky questions of when and where to install roadway illumination…

Newspapers are filled with stories describing reductions and removal of street lighting in order to reduce municipal costs. Tackling the tricky questions of when and where to install roadway illumination is a challenge for transportation agencies. Estimating nighttime crash reductions from roadway lighting is difficult in part because lighting tends to be installed along with other improvements like traffic signals or channelization, which makes it hard to isolate the benefits of lighting. Still, many believe that roadway lighting can improve visibility at night and that these improvements can provide drivers with increased time to respond to potential hazards. Previous efforts to relate visibility from roadway lighting to nighttime driving safety have been hampered by limited available data and by lack of consideration of vehicle headlights.

Working to overcome these limitations, Lighting Research Center (LRC) director and professor Mark Rea and senior research scientist John Bullough, collaborating with Eric Donnell, associate professor at Penn State and faculty researcher at the university’s Thomas D. Larson Pennsylvania Transportation Institute, have recently published a paper in the journal Accident Analysis and Prevention describing a unique parallel approach to lighting safety analysis. The full text of the paper, titled “To illuminate or not to illuminate: Roadway lighting as it affects traffic safety at intersections” is available here.

NightHeadlights200The team used lighting and crash data for state highway intersections in Minnesota to develop quantitative models relating nighttime driving safety to the presence of lighting at these intersections. Importantly, these models also included the effects of features like signals, medians and other intersection design and operational features in order to segregate the effects of lighting from these other aspects. Further, different statistical approaches yielded similar results, bolstering their reliability. Data for the statistical analyses were provided by the Minnesota Department of Transportation through the Federal Highway Administration’s Highway Safety Information System.

In parallel, LRC researchers modeled prototypical roadway intersections with and without lighting, based on roadway lighting practices in Minnesota, and including the effects of vehicle headlights. Using a model of visual performance developed by Rea while at the National Research Council of Canada, they were able to estimate drivers’ ability to detect potential hazards quickly and accurately under each lighting scenario compared to when no roadway lighting was present.

In both research efforts, Rea, Bullough and Donnell investigated rural and urban intersections with and without traffic signals. For example, the statistical models showed that roadway lighting at rural intersections tended to have small effects on nighttime driving safety. The team’s visibility analyses suggested that rural intersection lighting provided relatively little benefit in terms of visual performance, because most rural intersections are illuminated by one or two poles located at the junction, but the high traffic speeds on most rural highways require drivers to see hazards when those hazards might still be hundreds of feet from the junction. Most importantly, the statistical safety improvements associated with lighting were strongly correlated with the visibility improvements for all intersection types evaluated.

“While the finding that safety benefits from roadway lighting are highly related to the visibility improvements lighting provides is not novel nor unexpected, evidence for this direct link has been scarce in the literature,” said Rea. “Our models provide a tool that transportation agencies can begin using now to not only allocate lighting more efficiently, but to design lighting more effectively.” As new practices such as solid-state lighting, adaptive roadway and vehicle lighting, and benefit-cost analysis continue to emerge, tools like those described by Rea, Donnell and Bullough will help agencies specify and shape lighting that minimizes energy use and environmental impact while maximizing the use of limited public resources.

A 1-hour webinar will be held on this topic on Tuesday, April 2, 2013, 11:00 a.m., US Eastern Time. The cost is $25 per participant.

Click here to learn more and register.

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