Month: April 2012

Product Monday: New Infusion LED Module by GE Lighting

GE Lighting’s new Infusion LED module series features higher lumen packages and color options, creating new design opportunities for spotlighting, downlighting, track and accent lighting. These modules are available in…

GE Lighting’s new Infusion LED module series features higher lumen packages and color options, creating new design opportunities for spotlighting, downlighting, track and accent lighting. These modules are available in 1000, 1500, 2000 and 3000 lumens, in color temperatures of 2700K, 3000K and 4000K, and CRI options of 80 and 90. They are also dimmable and turn on instantly.

1 Comment on Product Monday: New Infusion LED Module by GE Lighting

Century-Old GE Bulbs Light Up 100th Anniversary Celebration of Nela Park

One hundred years ago—March 25, 1912 to be exact—executives and employees gathered at GE Lighting’s newly forming Nela Park campus to bury a sealed time capsule packed with a daily…

One hundred years ago—March 25, 1912 to be exact—executives and employees gathered at GE Lighting’s newly forming Nela Park campus to bury a sealed time capsule packed with a daily newspaper, pamphlets, pins, photos and some GE light bulbs representing available and emerging incandescent technologies of the era. The collection of treasures inside the capsule was placed inside a cornerstone of Marketing Building #307 where it was intended to speak to future generations about the state of lighting technology and the transformational growth that GE was experiencing in 1912.

Hundreds of GE Lighting employees and retirees recently gathered at the base of Building #307 for a real-time, once-in-a-lifetime history lesson. The time capsule was unearthed and its contents were carefully removed and put on display before being moved to a secure temperature- and light-controlled space across the Nela Park campus, near GE’s current multi-million dollar LED reliability and testing labs and clean room.

In a remarkable testament to the craftsmanship and quality of GE products and solutions at work for customers then and now, one of the tungsten filament lamps buried for 100 years showed signs of life. It was cleaned, screwed into a socket near the time capsule site and slowly powered up to the point of emitting light.

In April 2013, the company will bring Nela Park employees together for a ceremonial burying of a new time capsule, which is expected to include a GE Energy Smart LED 60W replacement, new consumer light bulb packaging debuting in 2012, marketing materials and an employee photo.

CEO Maryrose Sylvester unearthed lighting artifacts from a time capsule buried 100 years ago by the company’s founders.

The 100 year-old GE Lighting time capsule.

This 40-watt tungsten-filament incandescent bulb was one of five recovered when GE unearthed a 100-year-old time capsule buried at the base of a building at its Nela Park world headquarters. The bulb was cleaned up and tested at the time capsule ceremony and later in the lab. It both cases it emitted light.

A view of the Nela Park building where the time capsule was buried. Photographed December 2, 1912, prior to GE Lighting’s move to Nela Park.

1 Comment on Century-Old GE Bulbs Light Up 100th Anniversary Celebration of Nela Park

Come to the What’s New in Lamps and Ballasts Seminar at LIGHTFAIR 2012

For another year, industry veteran Howard Wolfman, PE and I will be presenting “What’s New in Lamps and Ballasts,” a 90-seminar at LIGHTFAIR 2012 providing an independent view of the…

This is Howard giving his part of the presentation the last time LIGHTFAIR was in Las Vegas, with Nick Bleeker, representing LIGHTFAIR, who introduced us, in the background.

For another year, industry veteran Howard Wolfman, PE and I will be presenting “What’s New in Lamps and Ballasts,” a 90-seminar at LIGHTFAIR 2012 providing an independent view of the latest trends and developments in lamp and ballast technology over the past 12-18 months.

The session will be held Wednesday, May 9, from 4:30 to 6:00 PM, in Room N119-N120. The session number is L12508.

As you plan your LIGHTFAIR itinerary, we hope you’ll join us for this very informative seminar!

No Comments on Come to the What’s New in Lamps and Ballasts Seminar at LIGHTFAIR 2012

Jim Brodrick on PAR38 L Prize Competition

Guest post by Jim Brodrick, Department of Energy [Recently], DOE reopened the PAR 38 category of the L Prize competition. As you might recall, we suspended that category in January…

Guest post by Jim Brodrick, Department of Energy

[Recently], DOE reopened the PAR 38 category of the L Prize competition. As you might recall, we suspended that category in January 2011 for retooling. Why? In order to incorporate lessons learned from the competition’s 60W replacement lamp category. The changes made will streamline and improve the competition process, to keep pace with the speed of innovation in the industry and move winning products into American homes and businesses sooner.

So what’s been changed in the PAR 38 category of the L Prize competition? First, let’s go over what’s not changed. All of the original, challenging performance requirements, as set forth by Congress in the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007, have been retained, to drive innovation and challenge industry as a whole to push the needle higher – and, of course, to ensure that winning products not only save energy, but also provide high-quality illumination. The rigorous vetting and testing has also been retained, to ensure that the performance, quality, lifetime, and availability of winning products meet expectations for mass manufacturing and widespread adoption. And to generate jobs for U.S. workers, U.S. sourcing remains a key part of the commercial production requirements; manufacture of at least 50 percent of the LEDs, and all of the product assembly, must be done in the United States.

But to shorten the competition timeline and reduce testing costs, DOE has modified some requirements related to testing and sample size. The cost of the initial photometric testing (LM-79) will now transfer to the entrant, and DOE will take advantage of the recently adopted industry standard method for extrapolating LED lumen maintenance over time (TM-21), thus enabling a shorter period of elevated-temperature testing. In addition, some clarifications have been made, especially with respect to how multiple, competing entries will be handled. And dimming – which frequently is not needed for PAR 38 bulbs – has been eliminated as a requirement.

The L Prize partners had asked DOE at the competition’s outset to institute a rigorous evaluation process, to ensure product performance and long life. But if the evaluation takes too long, it could delay market introduction of the winning product – in turn delaying benefits to consumers. The PAR 38 process has now been streamlined to reduce total evaluation time by about 30 percent, while still ensuring a highly rigorous performance evaluation. More details on key changes to the PAR 38 competition will be shared in a March 27 webcast (details and registration link available soon).

The changes are well worth it. PAR lamps, commonly known as “spot” or “flood” lamps, are widely used in retail businesses and as outdoor security and track lights. There are about 90 million PAR 38 halogen light bulbs installed in the U.S., in residential and commercial applications. DOE estimates that switching all of them with bulbs efficient enough to win the L Prize would save the country 11 terawatt-hours of electricity per year – approximately equivalent to the annual electricity consumption of Washington, DC – and annually avoid 7 million metric tons of carbon emissions.

The reopening of the L Prize competition’s PAR 38 category will help usher in the next phase of energy-efficient lighting. While the LED PAR 38 replacements currently on the market have shown some improvement over their predecessors, they still fall well short of L Prize-winning levels, especially with regard to beam characteristics, color quality, and light output. The winning products will not only cut down significantly on energy consumption, but will also save businesses and consumers a great deal of money in the long run. And because competitions drive innovation, and innovation drives market competition, the efficiency and quality of the other lighting products on the market are sure to move steadily upward – ultimately making everyone the real winners of the L Prize.

No Comments on Jim Brodrick on PAR38 L Prize Competition

Code News

OHIO: March 27, 2012. The Ohio Board of Building Standards (OBBS) has announced a public hearing on April 26, 2012 at 10AM in Reynoldsburg. IDAHO: February 2, 2012. Proposed electrical…

OHIO: March 27, 2012. The Ohio Board of Building Standards (OBBS) has announced a public hearing on April 26, 2012 at 10AM in Reynoldsburg.

IDAHO: February 2, 2012. Proposed electrical code adoption effectively killed.

NEW JERSEY: January 25, 2012. The New Jersey Uniform Construction Code Advisory Board announced the proposed adoption to the 2011 National Electrical Code (NEC).

PENNSYLVANIA: January 19, 2012. At the January 18, 2012 meeting of the Pennsylvania Uniform Construction Code Review and Advisory Council (RAC) the Council voted to recommend to the Pennsylvania Legislature that a six year code adoption cycle be instituted under the Uniform Construction Code.

KENTUCKY: December 16, 2011. The State of Kentucky approved the adoption of the 2011 NEC in the Kentucky Building Code without amendment.

No Comments on Code News

NEMA Publishes ANSI C136.29 Roadway and Area Lighting Equipment—Metal Halide Lamps–Guide for Selection

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published ANSI C136.29 Roadway and Area Lighting Equipment—Metal Halide Lamps–Guide for Selection. This selection guide includes screwbase single-ended metal halide lamps that can…

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published ANSI C136.29 Roadway and Area Lighting Equipment—Metal Halide Lamps–Guide for Selection.

This selection guide includes screwbase single-ended metal halide lamps that can be used in roadway and area lighting equipment.

The contents and scope of C136.29-2011 may be viewed here.

No Comments on NEMA Publishes ANSI C136.29 Roadway and Area Lighting Equipment—Metal Halide Lamps–Guide for Selection

Product Monday: Granville II LED Luminaires by Holophane

GranVille® II LED luminaires from Holophane offer the same classic housing choices that made Holophane’s GranVille HID line popular and are offered with Classic or Premier prismatic borosilicate glass optics…

GranVille® II LED luminaires from Holophane offer the same classic housing choices that made Holophane’s GranVille HID line popular and are offered with Classic or Premier prismatic borosilicate glass optics to facilitate use of new or installed pieces. These fixtures feature a new optical design that provides HID light levels while creating a comfortable wholly luminous appearance with low glare, less uplight and less light trespass. Multiple lumen packages are available and fixtures may be ordered with asymmetric or symmetric distributions. The luminaires are optimized to meet existing light standards. Click here to learn more.

No Comments on Product Monday: Granville II LED Luminaires by Holophane

DOE Approves Two-Year Extension for Energy Standards for 700 Series T8 Lamps

Department of Energy (DOE) regulations for general-service fluorescent lamps, which take effect July 14, 2012, strengthen standards established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 while expanding coverage to include…

Department of Energy (DOE) regulations for general-service fluorescent lamps, which take effect July 14, 2012, strengthen standards established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 while expanding coverage to include 8-ft. T8 lamps, 4-ft. T5 lamps and more wattages of 4-ft. T8 and T12 lamps. Aside from some exemptions, the regulations were expected to eliminate a majority of 4-ft. linear and 2-ft. U-shaped T12 lamps, many 8-ft. T12 and T12HO, and some lower-color-rendering 4-ft. T8 lamps.

As a result of the rare earth crisis, however, DOE recently granted a request by GE Lighting, Philips Lighting Company and OSRAM SYLVANIA to extend the effective date of the regulations for these companies’ lower-color-rendering 4-ft. T8 lamps by two years. The new effective date is now two years later, or July 14, 2014. This provides building owners a lower-cost option for applications where color rendering is less important, such as transition spaces, storage rooms and industrial applications.

Fluorescent lamps produce light through the process of fluorescence, in which electric current is passed through mercury vapor, resulting in the emission of UV radiation that is largely converted into visible white light by phosphors coating the lamp bulb. Application of rare earth phosphors, used in addition to or instead of traditional halophosphors, produce higher efficiency, color rendering and lumen maintenance. Five rare earth elements are used in phosphors for energy-efficient and high-color-rendering linear fluorescent lamps, primarily Yttrium, Europium and Terbium (which is why these lamps are sometimes called “triphosphor lamps”).

The problem is China currently controls more than 95 percent of the world’s supply. With demand increasing in recent years, China began limiting exports to ensure steady supply for its domestic industries, while increasing taxes and tariffs. As a result, prices skyrocketed—increasing at an annual rate of 400 and 500 percent respectively for Terbium and Europium oxides in 2011—forcing lamp manufacturers to announce a series of steep price increases for rare-earth phosphor lamps.

One manufacturer, OSRAM SYLVANIA, brought a halophosphor T8 lamp to market as a lower-cost option for building owners, but this product is expected to be discontinued July 14, 2012 as it does not comply with the fluorescent lamp regulations. By temporarily granting the lamp manufacturers’ request to exempt lower-color-rendering 4-ft. T8 lamps, building owners will enjoy another option suitable for some applications. These 700-series (color rendering index, or CRI, of 70+) T8 lamps contain 70 percent less phosphor content than 800-series (CRI of 80+) lamps. (For applications where color is important, a minimum of 80 CRI is recommended.)

A randomly selected 700-series product operates at 75 CRI and produces an initial 2,745 lumens, about seven percent less than a 2,950-lumen 800-series lamp, and 2,444 mean lumens, or 13 percent less than the same 800-series lamp (89 percent versus 95 percent lumen maintenance).

The increase in rare earth material prices is resulting in new sources being developed outside of China, but this will take time, and different mines do not yield the same quantities of various elements. According to the Department of Energy, Europium, Terbium and Yttrium will continue to see high risk to supply and cost uncertainty for the near future.

No Comments on DOE Approves Two-Year Extension for Energy Standards for 700 Series T8 Lamps

Top 10 States for LEED

Sq. ft. of space to earn LEED-certification in 2011 Per capita District of Columbia 18,954,022 31.50 Colorado 13,803,113 2.74 Illinois 34,567,585 2.69 Virginia 19,358,193 2.42 Washington 14,667,558 2.18 Maryland 11,970,869…

Sq. ft. of space to earn LEED-certification in 2011

Per capita

District of Columbia

18,954,022

31.50

Colorado

13,803,113

2.74

Illinois

34,567,585

2.69

Virginia

19,358,193

2.42

Washington

14,667,558

2.18

Maryland

11,970,869

2.07

Massachusetts

13,087,625

2.00

Texas

50,001,476

1.99

California

71,551,296

1.92

New York

36,538,981

1.89

Minnesota

9,591,445

1.81

No Comments on Top 10 States for LEED

Electrical Contractor Magazine Publishes Article About Model Lighting Ordinance

The Model Lighting Ordinance (MLO), produced jointly by the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) and the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA), provides a template for municipalities seeking to develop standards for responsible…

The Model Lighting Ordinance (MLO), produced jointly by the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) and the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA), provides a template for municipalities seeking to develop standards for responsible outdoor lighting. Specifically, the MLO addresses skyglow (light emitted up into the sky that obscures nighttime viewing of stars), light trespass (light emitted onto neighboring property), and glare (excessive brightness that impairs or disables vision).

Click here to read an article I contributed to Electrical Contractor Magazine that provides an introduction to the MLO.

No Comments on Electrical Contractor Magazine Publishes Article About Model Lighting Ordinance

Type on the field below and hit Enter/Return to search