Category: Codes + Standards

NEMA Publishes New Standard for LED Replacement Lamps

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) recently published NEMA LL 10-2020 Replacing HID Lamps with LED Lamps: Light Output Equivalency Claims. This new Standard assists manufacturers in preparing HID equivalency claims for LED products replacing HID lamps.

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) recently published NEMA LL 10-2020 Replacing HID Lamps with LED Lamps: Light Output Equivalency Claims. This new Standard assists manufacturers in preparing HID equivalency claims for LED products replacing HID lamps.

“The NEMA LL 10 Standard provides a basis for manufacturers of LED replacements for HID lamps to claim light output equivalency to HID lamps. It also provides a means for customers to verify manufacturer equivalency claims,” said Jim Gaines, Signify North America Corporation and chair of the NEMA Light Source Technical Committee. “It solves the problem of manufacturers making different claims of equivalency for products with the same luminous flux, which has led to confusion for customers and an uneven playing field for manufacturers.”

NEMA LL 10-2020 is available for $63 on the NEMA website.

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DesignLights Consortium Releases Second Draft of Update to Technical Requirements for Horticultural Lighting

The DesignLights Consortium (DLC) recently released the second draft of updated Technical Requirements for Horticultural Lighting (Version 2.1). Scheduled to take effect on July 1, the proposed changes would establish Qualified Products List (QPL) eligibility for three additional product types. Comments on the proposal are due by April 9.

The DesignLights Consortium (DLC) recently released the second draft of updated Technical Requirements for Horticultural Lighting (Version 2.1). Scheduled to take effect on July 1, the proposed changes would establish Qualified Products List (QPL) eligibility for three additional product types. Comments on the proposal are due by April 9.

First unveiled in October, the DLC’s Horticultural Lighting Technical Requirements V2.1 would add DC-powered fixtures, externally supplied actively cooled horticultural fixtures, and LED replacement lamps to the DLC’s Horticultural Lighting Program. The DLC is proposing changes to specifications related to all three product types in response to stakeholder comments received last fall.

The proposed V2.1 policy defines externally supplied actively cooled horticultural fixtures as those in which liquid, often water or a water/glycol solution, flows through input and output ports of each fixture in the system, channeled through a cooling plate or other heat exchanger within the fixture. In adding these products to its Horticultural Lighting Program, the DLC provides descriptions of how to test and report on them to ensure performance comparable to products listed under previous versions of the policy. Changes related to these fixtures in response to comments the DLC received following release of the first draft of V2.1 last fall, include removal of requirements specific to the cooling system and not measurable at the fixture level, and the following new proposals:

• New self-protect functionality requirements;
• Revisions to requirements for testing and reporting with respect to fixture-level allowable operating conditions for cooling systems;
• Reporting of image showing photosynthetic photon efficacy (PPE) as a function of inlet fluid temperature.

V2.1 would also allow two new types of LED horticultural lighting equipment to be listed on the QPL: DC-powered fixtures and LED replacements for linear fluorescent lamps and for mogul-base high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. For DC-powered fixtures, the newest version of the policy differs from the earlier draft by removing the proposed requirement for maximum cabling length testing, and by proposing:

• Revisions to testing and reporting of range of loading points required for the test power source report;
• Reporting of cabling conditions to maintain less than two percent cabling loss for a fully loaded power source.

For LED replacement lamps changes from Draft 1 in response to stakeholder comments include clarification of eligibility information, revision of electronics lifetime requirements, and proposals for:

• Reporting intended mounting of screw-base replacements for HID lamps;
• Allowing directional screw-base replacements for HID lamps;
• Reporting beam and/or field angle for all lamps.

The DLC’s Horticultural QPL currently contains more than 280 products, with more being reviewed and added regularly. An increasing number of electric utilities rely on the DLC horticultural lighting specification and QPL in the design of energy efficiency programs for commercial cultivators. About a dozen North American utilities now require the use of QPL products as a prerequisite for EE incentives; many others have incorporated the DLC Technical Requirements into their programs while not yet requiring use of products on the QPL. Two states with cannabis-specific energy efficiency regulations offer a compliance pathway that requires use of the DLC’s Horticultural Lighting QPL. To assist licensees in these states, the DLC’s Horticultural Lighting QPL offers a search filter to find products compliant with these regulations.

The DLC will accept comments on draft Technical Requirements for Horticultural Lighting V2.1 through Friday, April 9 via a comment form here.

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DLC Delists Solid-State Lighting Products Non-Compliant with V5.0 Technical Requirements

On February 28, the DesignLights Consortium delisted all products that have not been updated to comply with newer solid-state lighting performance standards from its Qualified Products List (QPL).

On February 28, the DesignLights Consortium delisted all products that have not been updated to comply with newer solid-state lighting performance standards from its Qualified Products List (QPL).

The DLC previously postponed the original delisting date of December 31, 2020 (announced with the release of its V5.0 Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Technical Requirements last February) in consideration of market disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. After the new delisting date of February 28, the DLC is allowing products non-compliant with SSL V5.0 to remain searchable using the “Show De-Listed Products” filter on its SSL QPL search page.

Version 5.0 of the SSL Technical Requirements increases the efficacy requirements for QPL-listed products consistent with the pace of technology, without compromising the quality of light. V5.0 includes new dimming requirements for all DLC Premium products– a change designed to increase energy savings by providing a gateway to controls utilization and improved user satisfaction.

The DLC adopted the V5.0 requirements amid recent technology advances and market shifts. As the LED market has matured over the past decade, a drive to reduce production costs in the face of mounting competition tended to sideline the importance of product quality aspects.

By requiring dimming capability for Premium Products on the DLC’s SSL QPL, V5.0 also points the LED market in a more controls-friendly direction. Since LEDs installed now may operate for a decade or more, strengthening controllability requirements (such as dimming and integral controls for daylight and occupancy) at the time of installation locks in potential energy and cost savings for years to come.

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CLTC Publishes Education Videos for California Title 24

The California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) recently released new videos introducing California’s 2019 Title 24, Part 6 lighting requirements.

The California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) recently released new videos introducing California’s 2019 Title 24, Part 6 lighting requirements.

Each video introduces a specific topic in the energy code:

  • Lighting Controls Technologies & Requirements
  • Lighting Alterations
  • Lighting Controls Acceptance Testing
  • High Efficacy Lighting

Click here to check them out or watch below:

Lighting Controls



Lighting Controls Acceptance Testing

High-Efficacy Lighting

Lighting Alterations

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NBI Releases Code Language that Achieves Carbon Neutral Buildings

The New Buildings Institute (NBI) recently released new code language that serves as a building decarbonization overlay to the 2021 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The Building Decarbonization Code is a tool aiming to deliver carbon neutral performance. It also offers market insight into rules that will determine how new buildings are designed and constructed in the future in order to curb the worst impacts of climate change.

The New Buildings Institute (NBI) recently released new code language that serves as a building decarbonization overlay to the 2021 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The Building Decarbonization Code is a tool aiming to deliver carbon neutral performance. It also offers market insight into rules that will determine how new buildings are designed and constructed in the future in order to curb the worst impacts of climate change.

The Building Decarbonization Code language is structured to be compatible with the current version of the IECC and covers both residential and commercial construction. The IECC is in use or adopted in 49 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, NYC and Puerto Rico, according to the International Code Council (ICC), which manages the code’s development.

The Building Decarbonization Code, which is part of a larger toolkit being developed for cities and states, is focused on codes for new construction with the potential of adding code language for existing buildings in a future version.  While not an all-electric code, the language does prioritize efficient electric equipment and is designed to be flexible. Sections cover All-Electric and Mixed-Fuel options.

The overlay incorporates code solutions to the inclusion of key electrification technologies including solar, electric vehicles, battery storage, and demand response and is designed to enhance building-grid integration so the buildings can be effectively used as an asset to shift times when energy is used and alleviate pressure on the electricity grid during peak demand periods.

Jurisdictions may use either section of the overlay in its entirety or use portions of either or both to amend the 2021 IECC to a code that is right for adoption to meet the needs of their communities and supports their climate goals.

Click here to learn more.

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ICC Launches Code Adoption Online Tool

The International Code Council recently launched online tools showing building code adoption in the United States and globally.

The International Code Council recently launched online tools showing building code adoption in the United States and globally.

Created in partnership with the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes (FLASH) and the Insurance Services Office (ISO), the U.S. code adoption database is an interactive map that shares code adoption information at the state and local level. A database displays which codes are adopted within each state/jurisdiction and provides context and links to access further code information.

The database also contains a color-coded map for each of the fifteen International Codes (I-Codes) – the most widely used model building codes in the world – showing statewide code adoptions around the U.S. The most current adoption information is maintained across the site through a collaboration effort between the Code Council, FLASH and ISO. This includes the International Energy Conservation Code, or IECC, which regulates the energy-efficient lighting design of new buildings.

Another online tool, the Global Building Codes Tool, provides information about the building codes and standards used in countries around the world. Users may select a country from the world map to view information about the respective building safety regulation agencies, and the building codes and standards referenced and enforced within that country. The tool is designed to help manufacturers and designers who are interested in exporting their products and services to markets outside the United States, as well as to government officials around the world who are monitoring these regulations which impact market entry. It also represents a key component of the Code Council’s Strategic Partnership with the U.S. Department of Commerce International Trade Administration.

Click here to check it out.

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International Code Council Releases IECC 2021

Estimated to be 10% more energy-efficient than the 2018 version, 2021 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) is now available for purchase.

Estimated to be 10% more energy-efficient than the 2018 version, 2021 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) is now available for purchase.

The new model energy code contains a number of changes, including mandatory plug load controls, electric vehicle infrastructure and charging stations, voluntary renewable energy guidelines, and others. I’ll be writing up an analysis of the lighting changes as soon as I get my hands on my copy.

Click here to buy a copy.

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DLC Announces SSL V4.4 Product Update and Delisting Extension

Due to continuing disruption to operations for both DesignLights Consortium (DLC) members and stakeholders as a result of COVID-19, the DLC is extending the deadline to update and the delisting date for products qualified under SSL V4.4 by two months.

Due to continuing disruption to operations for both DesignLights Consortium (DLC) members and stakeholders as a result of COVID-19, the DLC is extending the deadline to update and the delisting date for products qualified under SSL V4.4 by two months.

The new dates are:

  • January 31, 2021: Deadline to update V4.4 listed products to V5.0 or V5.1.
  • February 28, 2021: Delisting date for V4.4 listed products that have not been updated.

Click here for more information.

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How Will the New DLC 5.0 Standard Affect Rebates?

In February 2020, the Design Lights Consortium finalized the technical specifications for the next generation of LED products. These new requirements, versions 5.0 and 5.1, are designed to help usher in new levels of energy efficiency, light quality, and controllability. The DLC started certifying products under the new v5 spec earlier this year, and they will remove older products that don’t meet this certification on December 31, 2020. This change can have a significant impact on the potential rebates a project may receive.

In February 2020, the Design Lights Consortium finalized the technical specifications for the next generation of LED products. These new requirements, versions 5.0 and 5.1, are designed to help usher in new levels of energy efficiency, light quality, and controllability.

The DLC started certifying products under the new v5 spec earlier this year, and they will remove older products that don’t meet this certification on December 31, 2020. This change can have a significant impact on the potential rebates a project may receive.

In this article by rebate fulfillment firm BriteSwitch, the company answers questions about what is DLC and how it affects rebates, how the change to DLC 5.0 will impact rebates, and the outlook for rebates in 2021.

Click here to check it out.

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WELL 2.0 Officially Launched

The International WELL Building Institute recently announced the official launch of Version 2 of the WELL Building Standard, following a two-year vetting process.

The International WELL Building Institute recently announced the official launch of Version 2 of the WELL Building Standard, following a two-year vetting process.

Since the launch of the WELL v2 pilot in 2018, the revised standard has been market tested by more than 3,300 projects from a wide range of typologies representing more than 413 million square feet across 54 countries. The rating system has undergone a rigorous improvement and refinement process that included a six-month public comment period and formal stakeholder review, thousands of market insights gathered across two phases, plus feedback crowdsourced from nearly 600 leaders and experts from public health, medicine, government, academia and businesses worldwide, as well as the architecture, design, building science and real estate communities, as part of IWBI’s Task Force on COVID-19.

Following this intensive review process and a unanimous graduation vote by esteemed members of the IWBI Governance Council, WELL V2 is now available.

Check it out here.

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