Category: Codes + Standards

ioXt Certification Expands To Include Network Lighting Controls

The ioXt Alliance, a global standard for Internet of Things (IoT) product security, is expanding its ioXt Certification Program with a new profile for network lighting controls (NLC), allowing manufacturers to certify commercial lighting systems with wirelessly connected parts.

The ioXt Alliance, a global standard for Internet of Things (IoT) product security, is expanding its ioXt Certification Program with a new profile for network lighting controls (NLC), allowing manufacturers to certify commercial lighting systems with wirelessly connected parts. Aligned with the initiatives set forth by the DesignLights Consortium (DLC), which satisfies the NLC5 requirements, the new ioXt NLC Profile brings transparency and visibility to enterprise buyers in the commercial lighting space.

With a concentration on security, upgradability, transparency, and compliance, the ioXt Certification Program evaluates products against the eight ioXt pledge principles requiring that the devices will be tested against clear guidelines for quantifying the optimal level of security. The NLC profile is an efficient and cost-effective standard process for commercial lighting manufacturers to become DLC-compliant.

Once a manufacturer receives the ioXt stamp of approval, this satisfies the DLC’s cybersecurity requirements and the product is eligible for qualification, which is required for many rebates offered by efficiency programs throughout North America.

Read the full article here.

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Cybersecurity-Related Additions to DLC NLC5

The DesignLights Consortium (DLC) recently announced two additions to its Networked Lighting Controls (NLC) Technical Requirements, Version 5. These additions became effective December 22, 2021.

The DesignLights Consortium (DLC) recently announced two additions to its Networked Lighting Controls (NLC) Technical Requirements, Version 5. These additions became effective December 22, 2021.

These are:

  • The DLC now recognizes the PSA-certified cybersecurity standard with Chip Level 2 or 3 certification and with System Level 1, 2, or 3, and Device Level 1, 2, or 3 certification. This certification may now be used to meet the NLC5 cybersecurity requirement.
  • The DLC now recognizes accredited certifications from an organization accredited as “Management Systems Certification Bodies” by the International Accreditation Service (IAS) as valid proof of compliance with the ISO 27001 cybersecurity standard.

NLC5 becomes required February 28, 2022. Products that comply with NLC4 but not NLC5 will be de-listed.

Click here to learn more.

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New NEMA Standard For Street & Area Light Internal Energy Metering

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) published American National Standard for Roadway and Area Lighting Equipment—Metering Performance Requirements for LED Drivers with Integral Energy Measurement (ANSI C136.52-2021).

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) published American National Standard for Roadway and Area Lighting Equipment—Metering Performance Requirements for LED Drivers with Integral Energy Measurement (ANSI C136.52-2021). This new standard establishes acceptable metering performance criteria for LED drivers with built-in (integral to the driver) energy consumption measurement functionality for use in outdoor luminaire applications. It describes two metering device performance levels for roadway and area lighting applications: 2% Accuracy Class and 5% Accuracy Class.

This standard is written for use by roadway and area lighting component manufacturers, municipal and regional governments specifying outdoor lighting solutions, and street lighting offices/bureaus. ANSI C136.52-2021 is available on the NEMA website for $70.

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DLC Releases LUNA Technical Requirements Version 1.0 To Reduce Light Pollution

The Design Lights Consortium (DLC) released LUNA Versions 1.0 Technical Requirements for outdoor LED luminaires. The requirements limit sky glow, light trespass and mitigate light pollution.  LUNA products will appear…

The Design Lights Consortium (DLC) released LUNA Versions 1.0 Technical Requirements for outdoor LED luminaires. The requirements limit sky glow, light trespass and

mitigate light pollution.  LUNA products will appear as a subset of luminaires listed on the SSL Qualified Products List (QPL) and will be eligible for efficiency rebates and incentives designed for SSL V5.1 products. DLC Executive Director and CEO Christina Halfpenny said, “LUNA will streamlin

e the process of selecting efficient outdoor lighting products that minimize sky glow and light trespass while still yielding the efficiency benefits of LED lighting.”

LUNA will also help specifiers to fulfill the light pollution and trespass requirements of LEED and WELL building programs, and help projects follow application guidance in the joint IDA-IES Model Lighting Ordinance. According to the International Dark Sky Association (IDA), a third of all outdoor lighting in the US is wasted, costing facility owners some $3.3 billion annually and responsible for 21 million tons of carbon emissions annually.

The DLC notes, however, that the technical requirements apply only to white-light LED outdoor products, which does not include non-white (amber) luminaires, which are appropriate for settings such as environmentally sensitive areas. This is because standardized metrics are still in development for non-white light. The DLC anticipates that manufacturers will be able to apply to list products for LUNA qualification on the SSL QPL in the first quarter of 2022.

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NEMA Publishes The First LED Driver Robustness Test Methods Standard

NEMA announced it has published American National Standard for Lighting Equipment—LED Drivers Robustness (ANSI C82.15-2021)

NEMA announced it has published American National Standard for Lighting Equipment—LED Drivers Robustness (ANSI C82.15-2021). This is the first standard defining test procedures for LED driver robustness, and applies to hardware and microcontroller and microprocessor-based LED drivers. The test methods confirm a driver’s ability to withstand specific stresses.

This document’s core audience is LED driver manufacturers and testing laboratories. ANSI C82.15-2021 is available on the NEMA website for $100.

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ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR: Outcome-Based Energy Codes

My lighting column for the November 2021 issue of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR tackles outcome-based energy codes.

My lighting column for the November 2021 issue of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR tackles outcome-based energy codes.

Excerpt:

Codes are complex and sometimes confusing, sometimes requiring interpretation by the authority having jurisdiction. Because there is no national code, the country is a patchwork of codes. Energy codes only regulate design efficiency and are therefore limited to being predictive of energy savings based on estimates and modeling.

Going back more than a decade, some policymakers began working to simplify energy codes while addressing their shortcomings. Instead of a prescriptive-based (design within limitations, with some mandatory items) or performance-based (intensive modeling) compliance path, codes would evolve to be outcome-based, using a building’s actual measured/metered energy performance as the compliance metric.

It’s not an easy nut to crack, but the benefits continue to attract the interest of policy makers, particularly in California.

Click here to check it out.

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Whitepaper: How Zhaga Addresses Sustainability and the Circular Economy

The Zhaga Consortium has published a whitepaper, “How Zhaga addresses Sustainability and the Circular Economy.” The publication points out that durable, repairable, and upgradeable LED luminaires are key elements to sustainable lighting.

The Zhaga Consortium has published a whitepaper, “How Zhaga addresses Sustainability and the Circular Economy.” The publication points out that durable, repairable, and upgradeable LED luminaires are key elements to sustainable lighting. It explains that Zhaga is developing and standardizing interface specifications for components of serviceable luminaires, to help facilitate a new market framework called “Circularity Lighting.”

Sustainable action in the lighting industry entails the provision and continuous development of energy-efficient lighting solutions and the resource-saving design of durable and serviceable products. Serviceable products and systems are characterized by properties like repairability, upgradeability, replaceability, being future proof and durable. Such products and systems are designed in a modular way and the interfaces of the components used are based on standardized and widely recognized specifications. Zhaga uses the term “Circularity Lighting” for a market framework with products and systems that support the aims of the circular economy through enhanced serviceability.

The whitepaper describes various problems to be addressed:

  • The different life cycles of luminaires and connectivity solutions.
  • Even luminaires of high quality and durable design can experience an early failure.
  • An upgrade of product features may be desired.

Solutions are illustrated referencing to the Zhaga specifications:

  • Book 18 and Book 20 about intelligent interfaces between outdoor resp. indoor luminaires and sensor /communication modules.
  • Book 24 and Book 25 that allow programming of LED control gear from different manufactures by using unified NFC programmers.
  • Book 21 and Book 26 about linear socketable LED modules that allow the selection of modules with desired characteristics (efficiency, color temperature, CRI, etc.).

Click here to read the whitepaper.

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DesignLights Consortium Releases Draft 2 of LUNA Technical Requirements

The DesignLights Consortium (DLC) has released for comment the second draft of technical requirements for outdoor LED luminaires that not only save energy and meet the DLC’s Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Technical Requirements, but also include attributes that limit light pollution, sky glow and light trespass. Comments are due October 22.

The DesignLights Consortium (DLC) has released for comment the second draft of technical requirements for outdoor LED luminaires that not only save energy and meet the DLC’s Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Technical Requirements, but also include attributes that limit light pollution, sky glow and light trespass.

Drafted with the input of a multi-disciplinary Advisory Group convened last spring, the DLC’s draft LUNA Technical Requirements are meant to mitigate adverse environmental impacts of lighting at night while providing appropriate visibility for people. The DLC is accepting comments on the draft policy through October 22, 2021 (comments@designlights.org) and anticipates releasing final LUNA technical requirements by December 16, 2021.

Once LUNA is fully implemented in 2022, lighting manufacturers will be able to list and qualify their products to the specification. Project designers will then be able to easily search for LED outdoor lighting products in a subsection of LUNA Qualified Products on the DLC’s SSL Qualified Products List (QPL), which will include luminaires that are both energy efficient and have characteristics enabling best environmental practices for nighttime illumination.

 

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California Energy Commission Adopts 2022 Building Energy Efficiency Standards

The California Energy Commission (CEC) has adopted the 2022 Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Energy Code) for newly constructed and renovated buildings. If approved by the California Building Standards Commission in December, it will go into effect on January 1, 2023, providing a year to gear up for the changes.

The California Energy Commission (CEC) has adopted the 2022 Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Energy Code) for newly constructed and renovated buildings. If approved by the California Building Standards Commission in December, it will go into effect on January 1, 2023, providing a year to gear up for the changes.

As the state’s primary energy policy and planning agency, the CEC adopts standards every three years to cost-effectively increase the energy efficiency and lower the carbon footprint of buildings. Homes and businesses use nearly 70 percent of California’s electricity and are responsible for a quarter of the state’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

The 2022 Energy Code focuses on four key areas in newly constructed homes and businesses:

  • Encouraging electric heat pump technology for space and water heating, which consumes less energy and produces fewer emissions than gas-powered units.
  • Establishing electric-ready requirements for single-family homes to position owners to use cleaner electric heating, cooking and electric vehicle (EV) charging options whenever they choose to adopt those technologies.
  • Expanding solar photovoltaic (PV) system and battery storage standards to make clean energy available onsite and complement the state’s progress toward a 100 percent clean electricity grid.
  • Strengthening ventilation standards to improve indoor air quality.

The impact of climate change is accelerating, bringing an even greater need for buildings that are comfortable, efficient and resilient. Each updated code guides the construction of buildings to better withstand extreme weather, lower energy costs, and reduce climate and air pollution.

For more information, view the executive summary and learn more at the 2022 standards web page. We’ll revisit this topic with specific lighting changes in the near future.

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TALQ Protocol Goes Public

After nine years developing its software protocol to enable interoperability of smart street lighting systems and other smart city applications from multiple vendors, the TALQ Consortium announced it is sharing with the smart city community the detail of the TALQ OpenAPI Specification in the public domain.

After nine years developing its software protocol to enable interoperability of smart street lighting systems and other smart city applications from multiple vendors, the TALQ Consortium announced it is sharing with the smart city community the detail of the TALQ OpenAPI Specification in the public domain.

The TALQ protocol (both the data model and API definitions) can now be found openly and free-of-charge on GitHub. This provides cities and other municipal authorities, commentators, consultants and potential members with the opportunity to view the details of the specification and to understand the advantages it brings.

Making the specification public allows manufacturers of Central Management Software (CMS) and Outdoor Device Networks (ODN, so called ‘Gateways’) to consider integrating the protocol into their own systems and to become interoperable with the solutions of other vendors.

The benefit to the smart city community is that there will be even more awareness of the specification – both vendors and cities – allowing them to profit from decades of Smart Outdoor Lighting and Smart City experience and prepare future-proof solutions, whilst at the same time opening the specification up to public scrutiny.

The TALQ OpenAPI definition provides developers with access to an extensive set of tools. Widely available documentation generation tools can be used to display the API, and code generation tools can create servers and clients in various programming languages. A wide range of testing and other tools is also available, all of which dramatically reduces the development effort for system manufacturers.

Compliance with the specification will remain restricted to member companies, who will retain access to the carefully designed Test Suite with which they can test their systems internally until they are ready for official TALQ certification. These test tools provide valuable diagnostic information to accelerate the integration of the TALQ OpenAPI Specification.

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