Month: August 2017

Getting Ahead of the Curve on Dimming Curves

My contribution to the July issue of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR talks about dimming curves and why they’re important. As dimming becomes more important, electrical contractors may benefit by becoming familiar with…

My contribution to the July issue of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR talks about dimming curves and why they’re important.

As dimming becomes more important, electrical contractors may benefit by becoming familiar with dimming curves. The dimming curve defines how dimmers set voltage output in response to control signal input, such as a slider position. Intuitively, it would appear optimal for an LED light to dim in direct proportion to the input, what we would call a linear curve. If we push a slider halfway down on a dimmer, light output should reduce by 50 percent. It is indeed suitable for energy-saving applications. When dimming for visual needs, however, it often isn’t. In this case, the source ideally will dim along a nonlinear curve that matches user expectations (perceived as linear) and accounts for how the eye works.


Read it here.

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NLB Panel Discusses Power Over Ethernet

Lisa L. Isaacson (NuLEDs) and Michael S. O’Boyle (Philips Lighting) discussed power over Ethernet (PoE) systems at the National Lighting Bureau’s Annual Lighting Forum during a session called “Illuminating the…

Lisa L. Isaacson (NuLEDs) and Michael S. O’Boyle (Philips Lighting) discussed power over Ethernet (PoE) systems at the National Lighting Bureau’s Annual Lighting Forum during a session called “Illuminating the Future, Part One”. Randy Reid (EdisonReport) moderated.

According to Isaacson and O’Boyle, PoE differs from conventional DC networks in that the cabling used can carry both power and communications signals, much as a smart phone that receives both power and communications signals when it is connected to a computer via a universal serial bus (USB) connector.

Being able to rely on one cable network for all connected devices permits connected devices to communicate with one another, evolving into an “Internet of things” (IoT) inside each building where the technology is used, and to communicate with other systems and other buildings, to as wide an area as desired. It also enables users to communicate with their lighting, using a smart phone and an app, to increase or decrease the amount of electrical illumination being provided, or to change the color of its output.

The panelists noted that PoE will not eliminate the need for conventional AC circuitry, but it will eliminate the need for AC power transformation when it comes to power for electronic devices. Both panelists also expressed confidence that PoE will likely be installed routinely in the near-term future, not only because of the versatility it provides, but also because it is safer to handle: Line-voltage AC can cause fatal accidents; low-voltage DC is much safer. PoE systems will also become less costly to install, Ms. Isaacson said, because less installation labor is involved. Right now, the cost to install a conventional system or a PoE system is about the same, because PoE’s installation-labor savings are offset by higher equipment costs. As more competitors enter the market, and as the equipment becomes more widely available, equipment prices will fall, so that wiring a building with both PoE and AC, where needed, will cost less than wiring a building with AC alone.

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Norma Frank on Maintaining Streetlighting

Norma Frank, CLMC recently contributed a maintenance column to LD+A that talks about LED streetlighting maintenance. Traditionally, HID luminaires are cleaned when they are relamped, limiting light loss imposed by…

Norma Frank, CLMC recently contributed a maintenance column to LD+A that talks about LED streetlighting maintenance.

Traditionally, HID luminaires are cleaned when they are relamped, limiting light loss imposed by luminaire dirt depreciation (LDD). As stated above, LED luminaires promise much longer service life. They may present a different failure mode based on output rather than mortality along a curve that in time produces a steady failure rate. As a result, LDD’s significance as a light loss factor may be much greater for LED roadway and area luminaires, potentially reducing useful life.

She points out that what’s been missing is evidence upon which maintenance recommendations can be made, which was addressed in a study conducted by VTTI:

The IES engaged the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute to study and quantify LDD in a range of LED roadway luminaire types. The resulting report, Measure and Report Luminaire Dirt Depreciation (LDD) in LED Luminaires for Street and Roadway Lighting Applications (IES RES-1-16), provides an excellent start to understanding this issue and making maintenance recommendations.

Click here to read the article.

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Product Monday: Task Light by LUX

LUX LED Lighting’s Brooklyn AC LED task light integrates universal AC sockets in addition to the two USB ports, providing integrated charging in addition to task lighting. Three touch-activated brightness…

LUX LED Lighting’s Brooklyn AC LED task light integrates universal AC sockets in addition to the two USB ports, providing integrated charging in addition to task lighting. Three touch-activated brightness settings, 80+ CRI, 3000K, 90 lumens/W. Brushed Aluminum and Black Slate finishes.

Click here to learn more.

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Indoor LED Luminaire Design: State of the Art

Below is another contribution to the August issue of tED Magazine, this one on the topic of what’s new in indoor LED luminaires. Reprinted with permission. The indoor commercial general…

Below is another contribution to the August issue of tED Magazine, this one on the topic of what’s new in indoor LED luminaires. Reprinted with permission.

Image courtesy of Philips Lighting.

The indoor commercial general luminaire market includes linear, directional, decorative and high-/low-bay luminaires. This market continues its major shift to LED technology.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in 2015, 12 percent of the installed base of commercial luminaires featured LED lamping, or 136 million units. By 2020, DOE projected that under industry conditions current in 2015, these numbers would surge to 36 percent, or 436 million units. Today, the majority of luminaires sold into new construction and renovation projects feature LED lamping.

As the technology matures, the LED luminaire market has stratified similarly to the conventional lighting market into basic-, specification- and architectural-grade segments. Energy efficiency, life and cost drive the former, with examples such as lensed troffers and flat panels. Aesthetics, performance and value-added features drive the latter markets. An example is luminaires offered as alternatives to troffers that feature advanced optics to reduce brightness and the number of luminaires required.

This article presents the major trends driving LED product development and applications and how electrical distributors can capitalize on these trends to generate profitable sales.

Major trends

Product development focuses on the major luminaire elements of light source, control gear, optics and construction. As lighting controls integrate with luminaires, increasingly, onboard control is part of the mix.

“LED efficacy continues to increase and package sizes are trending smaller,” said Christopher Dolan, Product Marketing Director, Indoor General Area, Philips Lighting. “Drivers will also get smaller as LED power requirements decrease.”

The result is indoor LED luminaires are becoming increasingly efficacious, producing more light per watt, and making this technology ever more competitive against traditional lighting. Higher light output means fewer LEDs are required. Lower source power means drivers can become smaller while also driving demand for higher efficiency.

“Luminaires will likewise trend smaller and will be designed around the forms of the new sources rather than forcing LEDs into luminaires for which form factors have been dictated by older technologies,” Dolan said. “This includes shallow recessed as well as shallow surface. Consider the exploding ‘slim surface’ category where the driver is mounted to the J-box.”

“Additionally, optical control has moved from reflectors behind lamps to lenses or optics over the LEDs, which adds to the sleekness of the new designs,” noted Rebecca McCall, Director of Education & Training, Hubbell Lighting, Inc. “By removing the lamp sockets, the amount of wiring needed inside the fixture has been drastically reduced as well.”

Jerry Mix, President, Finelite, Inc., cautioned, however, that the era of double-digit year-over-year efficacy gains from LEDs is over. “Innovative design will maximize other mechanical, optical, material and control features to achieve the highest performance,” he said.

He added that by breaking with traditional form factors, designers are free to develop novel solutions more specifically oriented to applications. “We are no longer required to use standard lengths to light spaces,” Mix said. “The architecture and design of the space can be used to determine the type, length and all the specifics of the lighting. Long, linear lines of light are trending as the dominant way to light spaces. Lighting vertical surfaces with perimeter slot and grazer lighting is coming back. We are seeing a continuing designer demand for luminaires with an elevated design aesthetic. Custom linear shapes are growing along with squares, rectangles and circles.”

Dolan noted many specifiers are satisfied with current efficacy offerings, and are looking for other performance advantages such as visual comfort. “We’re seeing a trend where specifiers are saying, ‘Efficacy—good enough. Give me visual comfort,’ and asking about Unified Glare Rating,” he said.

Joe Semaan, Director of Marketing and Product Management, Eaton, said integration of connected controls has emerged as another significant trend. “All of our designs for indoor commercial LED lighting now incorporate sensing and communication features,” he said. “We started a few years back with the integration of sensors to detect occupancy/vacancy and measure light levels. We’ve since added the ability to sense temperature and power usage in addition to tracking assets. The aggregated sensor data eventually ends up in easy-to-read dashboards of analytic detail. By collecting granular real-time data from sensors and smart building solutions, our customers are in control.”

A final major trend is tunable-white lighting, options for which abounded at this year’s LIGHTFAIR along with connected lighting. “Options like LEDs with higher color rendering for color-critical applications and white color tuning, which allows changing the color of light from warm to cool in appearance, are becoming more desired,” Semaan said.

“Regulations and customer desire to save energy costs is directing trends to lean toward LED designs that offer multiple functionalities within the same product,” McCall said. “These can range from programmable drivers to allow change in lumen output to color tuning capabilities within a product. One feature of LED that has been preferred from the beginning is the ability to dim the fixtures easily with 0-10V controls.”

Image courtesy of Philips Lighting.

Upping your lighting game

Interviewed manufacturers advised electrical distributors to get educated about lighting, carefully manage inventory, vet new products and suppliers, promote value-added features, and become familiar with controls.

“Electrical distributors will continue to play a major role in the connected lighting industry, provided they begin charting a course for their businesses today,” Semaan said. “Our industry has recently undergone a major transformation from traditional light sources to LED, thereby changing the way luminaires get promoted and sold.”

He added the industry is currently undergoing another transformation to programmable and networked lighting. All of this has changed the conversation from components to energy management to productivity, efficiency, occupant comfort and data.

“As the industry moves toward delivering more lighting systems and services, it is both a threat and opportunity for distributors to keep up with the accelerated pace of innovation,” Dolan said.

He said customers are currently thinking about how to adopt new lighting and services while preparing to embrace emerging technologies. A challenge to distributors seeking to balance their inventory by managing both new products and existing products that may become obsolete quickly.

Mix noted the only real threat to electrical distributors is the declining lamp replacement market. Otherwise, educated electrical distributors will only become more valuable as lighting gets more complicated—given they partner with good suppliers and stay on top of what’s new.

“They will do what they have always done, and that is partner with good manufacturers and educate the market on the difference that exists in product lines,” he said. “Lighting is no longer a commodity purchased at the lowest possible first cost. The industry will continue to become more educated and the technology will rapidly advance, so differentiating yourself through education while demonstrating expertise will lead to success.”

McCall advised distributors to carefully vet new suppliers and products. Make sure the manufacturer has a good reputation and whether their products conform and are tested to industry standards. When in doubt, confirm it is listed in the DesignLights Consortium’s Qualified Products List.

“The reality is many end-users and contractors are not aware of what’s possible today with respect to lighting and advanced functionality,” she said. “An understanding of these concepts will afford you the opportunity to be the technology leader in your marketplace.”

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Acuity Brands’ Trish Foster on K-12 School Lighting

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Trish Foster, LC, LEED Green Associate, Director, Education Market Development, Acuity Brands. The topic: K-12 school lighting. I’m happy to share her responses…

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Trish Foster, LC, LEED Green Associate, Director, Education Market Development, Acuity Brands. The topic: K-12 school lighting. I’m happy to share her responses with you here. The interview informed an article I wrote for the December 2017 issue of tED Magazine.

DiLouie: How would you characterize the K-12 education lighting market?

Foster: This is an exciting time for the K-12 lighting market. Data indicates that there continues to be growth in education construction. From a renovation standpoint, this means the older, dated schools, are looking for not only more efficient solutions, but also solutions that can have a positive impact on the learning environment. The education market in general is becoming more “interactive” with tools such as tablets and smart boards. Intuitive lighting controls further expand the teacher’s toolbox. For instance, tunable solutions allow the teacher to easily change the lighting intensity and color temperature to improve student engagement, depending upon factors like classroom activity or time of day. Lighting becomes another teaching tool.

DiLouie: What are the top design trends in K-12 classrooms? How are K-12 classrooms changing?

Foster: Collaborative spaces are the top trend we are seeing. Classroom environments that allow teachers and students to interact with one another and exchange ideas. Classrooms today are not static environments where students sit in uniform rows facing a chalkboard. In fact, I have visited classrooms without any desks at all. Students have alternative seating options such as bean bags and sofas.

Also, teachers continue to be very creative with their lighting. In many classrooms, teachers are using table lamps or ceiling lantern lights to create warmer learning environments. This trend is positive for all lighting professionals because it indicates a need from teachers to alter the learning environment based on the task at hand.

Lastly, schools are wanting apps to control their spaces. They want the AV screen to be controlled by an app, attendance recording to be managed by an app. Even homework and class assignments are communicated and graded digitally. K-12 schools are embarking upon the Internet of Things.

DiLouie: Generally, how are these design trends affecting best practices in K-12 classroom lighting design?

Foster: If spaces and activities are flexible, this means the lighting and controls need to be flexible as well. The lighting must be functional, of course, but with controls that are easy to understand and operate. A teacher must feel confident that when she presses a control panel, the outcome will be what he/she expects.

DiLouie: How influential are initiatives like CHPS, energy codes and LEED in the construction and renovation of schools?

Foster: Energy codes are very influential. For states that have adopted IECC 2015, LED lighting with controls integration is a given. Typically, codes drive the initial interest in lighting controls for a school space.

Initiatives such as CHPS and LEED still have a very important role in school projects, although I am not hearing as many conversations around LEED. Both CHPS and LEED provide outstanding guidelines for creating efficient and sustainable spaces, that have a positive impact on the learning environment and incorporate natural daylight into the space.

DiLouie: Tunable-white lighting is offering ways to support learning by allowing teachers to control both intensity and color temperature throughout the day. How useful are these strategies, and what evidence supports their use? What are typical lighting requirements? What lighting and control solutions are appropriate for satisfying these requirements?

Foster: The ability to tune the color temperature of the light is certainly one of the most significant advances. A class with intensive laboratory-style learning may benefit from a different color temperature than a class focusing more on reading or independent studies. With the advancements of LED technology and the easy-to-use controls platforms, every classroom can now benefit from tunable white lighting.

Research indicates that changing the color temperature based on the activity or task at hand can positively impact mood, behavior, and concentration. In fact, there is a school in Carrollton Texas that installed tunable white lighting in a 5th grade classroom at the start of the 2016 school year. Results from their annual state examination demonstrated an improvement over last year’s scores. The only variable changed with these students was the tunable lighting. You can learn more about this project by clicking here.

One final comment about tunable lighting in classrooms is that the kiddos embrace it. They remind the teacher to change the lighting when an activity changes. They also learn about the impact of lighting on the space. In fact, there is one 5th grader who is afraid his grades will suffer when he moves to the 6th grade classroom because tunable white lighting is not installed there.

DiLouie: What are the most appropriate retrofit options for K-12 classrooms?

Foster: There are many retrofit options available. When a school is considering a “true” retrofit they should look for solutions that are cost effective, easy to install and can be a one for one replacement. Luminaires that match existing form factors, such as 2×4 configurations, and wireless controls can help to keep the retrofit project on schedule and on budget.

DiLouie: How are energy codes affecting design of K-12 classrooms?

Foster: Energy codes are having a significant impact on K-12 classrooms. Classrooms have really been the slowest to adopt LED solutions and, in some cases, controls. Codes are expediting this shift. With any new or renovation classroom project, it is difficult to meet the codes without including these solutions.

DiLouie: What LED benefits are particularly suited to classrooms?

Foster: Of course, LED offers an energy-efficient solution with a long life, which means reduced on-going maintenance cost, but there are other benefits from using LED lighting in the classroom. The most significant benefit is the ease of controllability. Teachers can now easily change the intensity of the light levels based on the task and, with the appropriate driver technology, flicker is virtually eliminated. This allows for comfortable environments that enhance student learning. In the end, LED is a win-win for all stakeholders from administrators… to teachers…to students…to facility managers.

DiLouie: When selecting an appropriate K-12 lighting solution, what should electrical distributors be looking for?

Foster: It is pretty simple. Distributors need to offer the best solution for the specific needs of an application. In the case of classrooms, this means solutions that are cost-effective, have intuitive teacher controls, are easy to install and have a positive impact on students’ mood and concentration. When they offer a solution that meets these four criteria, both the distributor and the school win.

DiLouie: What can distributors do to ensure they are most competitive in the education lighting market?

Foster: Distributors need to think outside of the traditional way of selling products. It is now about the total solution, integrating luminaires and controls. Simple energy savings and payback is still important, but the conversation is now expanding into an emotional connection where student performance and optimizing the learning environment is key.

Also, distributors must expand the reach of the conversation to stakeholders who were maybe not engaged in the past. It’s now a full circle discussion between facility managers, principals, teachers and the distributor.

DiLouie: If you could tell all electrical distributors just one thing about today’s education lighting market, what would it be?

Foster: Everything about the educational environment is changing. New teaching styles, different learning tools and the physical space. Distributors must make lighting and controls a part of the “new conversation” in schools.

DiLouie: Is there anything else you’d like to add about this topic?

Foster: Schools are like a small city. Each space of the school campus has a different activity. Lighting and controls need to complement this. Remember, a high-performance lighting system is one that delivers the right type of light, right amount of light, where needed and when needed.

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Revised SSL Standard Extends Chromaticity Range

In a revision of ANSI C78.377-2017 American National Standard for Electric Lamps—Specifications for the Chromaticity of Solid-State Lighting Products, the ANSI Accredited Standards Committee C78, Electric Lamps, establishes a range…

In a revision of ANSI C78.377-2017 American National Standard for Electric Lamps—Specifications for the Chromaticity of Solid-State Lighting Products, the ANSI Accredited Standards Committee C78, Electric Lamps, establishes a range of chromaticity for general lighting with solid-state lighting (SSL) products to ensure that product chromaticity can be communicated to consumers.

Published by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), which also serves as secretariat for the standard, ANSI C78.377 applies to LED lamps, LED light engines, and LED luminaires for general indoor lighting applications.

This revision extends the range of color points for general lighting with energy efficient SSL lighting products. It specifies chromaticity regions below the blackbody (Planckian) locus that are suitable for some lighting applications. Annex E Extended Specifications includes recent studies supporting the premise that light sources with chromaticity in the extended correlated color temperature categories are adequate for many applications.

Click here to purchase the standard.

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Sports Lighting 101

Below is my contribution to the August issue of tED Magazine on the topic of sports lighting. Reprinted with permission. Since 2000, an average 60 percent of Americans have identified…

Below is my contribution to the August issue of tED Magazine on the topic of sports lighting. Reprinted with permission.

Since 2000, an average 60 percent of Americans have identified themselves as a sports fan, according to Gallup. In 2016, U.S. construction spending on amusement and recreation facilities (not including those built as part of educational facilities) increased nearly 10 percent to about $22 billion. In regard to lighting, new and renovated facilities are a juncture of venerable best practice, robust regulation and new technology.

In 2015, the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) published an update to RP-6, Sports and Recreational Area Lighting. RP-6 states, “The goal of lighting for sports is to provide an appropriate luminous environment that contributes to the visibility of the playing target (ball), the competitors and the surrounding backgrounds.” Put another way, sports lighting should deliver optimal light levels and visual comfort for play and spectating.

Achieving this goal requires addressing quantity of illumination, or providing minimum maintained horizontal and/or vertical light levels. It also requires addressing quality of illumination, which incorporates a range of factors such as uniformity, glare, modeling and color quality. Care should be taken to minimize light trespass and skyglow in outdoor installations as dark-sky communities continue to grow across the U.S. Finally, selecting efficient luminaires, avoiding overlighting and using lighting controls can achieve good lighting while minimizing energy consumption.

Lighting the Bridgestone Arena. Photo by John Russell. Image courtesy of Eaton’s Ephesus Lighting.

Recommendations are geared by venue, sport and classification of play. Venues include both indoor and outdoor spaces—arenas, covered stadiums, athletic fields, field houses, gymnasiums and pools. Sports include aerial (e.g., baseball, basketball, football) and ground level (e.g., hockey, boxing, skating). Classification of play includes Class I (competition play with 5,000+ spectators), Class II (competition play with up to 5,000 spectators), Class III (competition play with up to 2,000 spectators) and Class IV (competition or recreational play with limited or no spectators). Some facilities are used for different sports and classifications of play, and therefore should be able to address the requirements of all uses.

Class I facilities, of course, impose the most complex requirements. Not only do these facilities have special design requirements, often broadcasting is involved. Sports organizations and/or broadcasters may impose detailed lighting requirements regulating everything from light levels to color.

Let’s look at a football field as an example. This sport is multidirectional, combining aerial and ground play. Typical lighting includes aimable floodlights mounted on crossarms fixed on poles. For nighttime play on a Class I field, IES recommends 100 footcandles (fc) of maintained horizontal illumination, measured or calculated 3 ft. above the field on a 30-ft. x 30-ft. grid. It is important the light distribute uniformly across the playing area. The Uniformity Ratio (UR), expressed as a ratio between the highest and lowest calculated or measured light level values, should be 1.7:1 or less. The Coefficient of Variation (CV), which expresses a weighted average of all light level values, should be 0.13 or less.

These recommendations become less stringent for other classifications: 50 fc, 2:1 or less UR, and 0.17 or less CV for Class II; 30 fc, 2.5:1 or less UR, and 0.21 or less CV for Class III; and 20 fc, 3:1 or less UR, and 0.25 or less CV for Class IV.

Continuing our example, luminaires are often mounted on poles typically varying in quantity as four, six or eight poles. These poles commonly install along the sides of the football field behind the bleachers to ensure clear spectator views. With larger setbacks, more luminaires and taller poles may be necessary.

Floodlights should be aimed out of the players’ line of sight to avoid direct glare. Each floodlight’s beam spread should place the highest quantity of its light output on the field without producing a “hot spot,” and with coverage overlapping the distribution of adjacent luminaires. A range of beam spreads is available, with luminaires typically designated as Beam Type 1-7 based on the NEMA sports luminaire classification system. This system is being challenged by LED luminaires, which offer the ability to precisely tailor beam spread based on the application.

Comparison of HID luminaires (right) with LED luminaires combining a base TIR optical array with advanced optical features to minimize glare and optimize light control (right). Image courtesy of Musco Lighting.

An eight-pole configuration might include four on each side, inset 30 ft. from each end (around the 0-yard line), spaced 100 ft. apart and set back 15 to 45 ft. A six-pole configuration might include three on each side, inset 30 ft., spaced 150 ft. apart and set back 45-74 ft. A four-pole configuration might include two on each side, inset 90 ft., spaced 180 ft. apart and set back over 75 ft. Major stadiums may see installation of floodlights in four lighting towers (one at each corner) or mounted on architecture such as an overhead steel truss system.

For a 160-ft.-wide standard football field, a setback of 30 ft. would typically entail a mounting height (measured from ground to the bottom of the floodlight crossarm) of 50 ft., according to IES. For a 50-ft. setback, a 60-ft. mounting height. For an 80-ft. setback, an 80-ft. mounting height.

Equipment should be selected appropriate to the application requirements. Light output, beam spread, shielding, color quality, ease of maintenance, energy efficiency, aiming, ingress protection and other factors must be evaluated based on the application. As with other applications, LED technology offers some significant advantages and is being rapidly adopted; in 2015 and 2017, the Super Bowl was played under LED lighting. Notable benefits include significant energy savings, longer life, spectral tuning, controllability (including dynamic events such as halftime shows), and optical options enabling superior glare control and a wide range of beam spreads. Another advantage is instant-ON operation, a critical consideration in resuming play after a power interruption, particularly during televised events. During the 2013 Super Bowl at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome, the stadium went partially dark, delaying play for about a half hour on account of the metal halide luminaires taking time to resume full brightness after power was restored. In 2016, the Superdome upgraded to a new LED system.

Another advantage of LED sports lighting is the ability to incorporate color and control to implement dynamic shows, as shown here at the U.S. Bank Stadium. Image courtesy of Eaton’s Ephesus Lighting.

Sports lighting is one of the more complex but rewarding lighting markets, imposing varying requirements based on type of play, venue and classification. As such, it pays to become educated about the basics and new product offerings so as to recommend and select appropriate solutions.

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Product Monday: Obscura by Focal Point

Focal Point’s Obscura is a distinctive linear suspended luminaire. Illumination emanates from within its angular open housing, combining with a clean modern aesthetic. LEDs reflect light off the geometric figure…

Focal Point’s Obscura is a distinctive linear suspended luminaire. Illumination emanates from within its angular open housing, combining with a clean modern aesthetic.

LEDs reflect light off the geometric figure onto the thin frosted acrylic blades, achieving 80% indirect and 20% direct distribution. The optical design creates a wide batwing distribution for increased spacing between luminaires (up to 16 ft. on center). Efficacies up to 129 LPW). Individual lengths available from 4 to 12 ft. in 1-ft. increments and modern finishes: White or Palladium Silver exterior body and White or Infinity interior end caps.

Obscura also integrates Focal Point’s Power-Up technology where power is delivered through the aircraft suspension cables, eliminating the visual cutter of power cords.

Click here to learn more.

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Philips’ Susanne Seitinger Talks Liberated Pixels

In a recent post at Edison Awards (not to be confused with the GE lighting awards), Philips Lighting’s Susanne Seitinger talks about illuminated drones used at the 2017 Superbowl Halftime…

In a recent post at Edison Awards (not to be confused with the GE lighting awards), Philips Lighting’s Susanne Seitinger talks about illuminated drones used at the 2017 Superbowl Halftime Show and other special events, a concept she calls “liberated pixels.” Combining LED lighting and control with drones creates new opportunities and challenges for outdoor event lighting.

Check it out here.

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