Month: April 2014

LD+A: A Specifier’s Guide to LED Sources

In his article in the February edition of LD+A, Steve Landau of LED module manufacturer Xicato advises designers to ask luminaire manufacturers 10 questions before specifying LEDs for their projects….

In his article in the February edition of LD+A, Steve Landau of LED module manufacturer Xicato advises designers to ask luminaire manufacturers 10 questions before specifying LEDs for their projects. Click here to read it.

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Next Generation Luminaires Competition Deadline Extended

The current competition for the indoor lighting product category for the Next Generation Luminaires Design Competition has been extended: MAY 23, 2014: Written Intents to Submit due online at www.ngldc.org…

LED

The current competition for the indoor lighting product category for the Next Generation Luminaires Design Competition has been extended:

MAY 23, 2014: Written Intents to Submit due online at www.ngldc.org

JUNE 30, 2014: Product entries due

Judging will take place in early August, and the winners will be announced at the LED Show in September.

This competition recognizes the best LED products in the industry.

Click here to learn more.

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IES Announces Call for Papers for its 2014 Annual Conference

The 2014 annual conference of the Illuminating Engineering Society will take place November 2-4, 2014 in Pittsburgh, PA. Authors of papers regarding the art, science and practice of illumination are…

ies

The 2014 annual conference of the Illuminating Engineering Society will take place November 2-4, 2014 in Pittsburgh, PA.

Authors of papers regarding the art, science and practice of illumination are invited to submit their papers for possible presentation. Paper presentations provide a valuable vehicle for educating the membership about important technical advances in lighting. The Papers Committee especially encourages submission of papers dealing with in a wide range of topics in both research and application. Papers may be submitted in two different categories: Papers and Poster.

Paper Due Date: June 5, 2014
Poster Due Date: July 26, 2014

For Conference Papers Submittal Procedures, click here.

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Product Monday: Zenith Square-Shaped Pendant by Prudential Lighting

Based on the popularity of the company’s Half Snap wrap luminaire, Prudential Lighting has introduced Zenith, a modern square-shaped pendant. A simple, geometric halo of light, Zenith is well-suited for…

Based on the popularity of the company’s Half Snap wrap luminaire, Prudential Lighting has introduced Zenith, a modern square-shaped pendant. A simple, geometric halo of light, Zenith is well-suited for elevating wide-open spaces. Available in 2’ x 2’, 3’ x 3’, 4’ x 4’, round or square lenses, LED or seamless fluorescent, 14 premium color options.

Click here to learn more.

Prudential Zenith Release-1

Prudential Zenith Release-2

Prudential Zenith Release-3

Prudential Zenith Release-4

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Demand for T5 and T12 Lamps Increases During Fourth Quarter

T5 and T12 lamp shipments improved by 9.9% and 9.4%, respectively, on a quarterly basis (q/q) during 2013Q4. Shipments of T8 lamps contracted 2.1% q/q. Nevertheless, calendar year (CY) 2013…

T5 and T12 lamp shipments improved by 9.9% and 9.4%, respectively, on a quarterly basis (q/q) during 2013Q4. Shipments of T8 lamps contracted 2.1% q/q. Nevertheless, calendar year (CY) 2013 showed the index advancing 9.4% on an annual basis. The index for T5 lamps also registered a gain during CY2013, besting CY 2012 by 9%. In contrast, T12 lamps posted an annual decline of 25.6% for CY2013.

Market shares for the three linear fluorescent lamp types showed mixed results during the quarter. T8 lamps yielded 2.3% posting a share of 70.6%. T5 and T12 lamps posted gains during the quarter, securing market shares of 11.7% and 17.7%, respectively.

nema2

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Current Electrical Industry Business Conditions Improve in March

NEMA’s Electroindustry Business Conditions Index (EBCI) for current conditions in North America edged above the 50 point mark typically associated with a stable business environment in March to 52.6. The…

NEMA’s Electroindustry Business Conditions Index (EBCI) for current conditions in North America edged above the 50 point mark typically associated with a stable business environment in March to 52.6. The gain came on the heels of a reading of 50 in February and a sharp drop in January. Though the index for expected future business conditions retreated, it continued to point to widespread optimism. The EBCI for North American conditions six months hence fell to 86.6 from 91.2 in February.

nema

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Jim Brodrick on LED Lumen Maintenance and Light Loss Factors

Republication of Postings from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Program by Jim Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy All lighting systems decline in lumen output over time, due…

Republication of Postings from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Program

by Jim Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy

All lighting systems decline in lumen output over time, due to reductions in lamp emissions and changing surface properties. This decline is typically accounted for by applying a light loss factor (LLF) during the design process. An LLF is a multiplier that’s used to predict maintained illuminance based on the initial properties of a lighting system.

A new article published in Leukos: The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) discusses complications related to the lamp lumen depreciation (LLD) light loss factor and LEDs. Entitled “Lumen Maintenance and Light Loss Factors: Consequences of Current Design Practices for LEDs,” the article compares the performance of some conventional and LED products, and examines alternatives to the currently recommended approach for determining LLD factors for LED products. It was written by Michael Royer of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a member of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) solid-state lighting team.

Light loss factors are used to help lighting systems meet quantitative design criteria throughout the life of the installation, but they also have other consequences, such as influencing first cost and energy use. Because of the unique operating characteristics of LEDs and lack of a comprehensive lifetime rating — as well as the problematic relationship between SSL lifetime and lumen maintenance — determining an appropriate LLD factor for LED products is difficult.

For LED-based lighting systems, the IES recommends using an LLD of no greater than 0.70 when the quantity of the light is an important design consideration. This approach deviates from the practice of using the ratio of mean to initial lumen output — which is typically used with conventional sources — and may misrepresent actual performance, increase energy use, and inhibit comparisons between products.

With all of the effort that’s put into improving luminous efficacy in the name of energy efficiency, the effect of LLFs on energy use may deserve more attention, with more care given to using an LLD that best represents expected performance for a given installation. For example, a change in LLD from 0.70 (resulting in an initial light level at 143 percent of the target) to 0.80 (initial light level at 125 percent of the target) can reduce energy consumption by roughly 13 percent over the life of the system.

For LED lamps and luminaires, the rated lifetime provided by manufacturers is typically based on only the lumen maintenance of the LED package, which has become the de-facto method for providing rated lifetime for LED products. Although the lumen maintenance lifetime of LED architectural lighting products is almost always based on L70 (the time it takes for the lumen output to fall to 70 percent of what it was originally), this is not helpful for calculating an LLD factor. As an alternative, it may be more appropriate to instead use a known end point (e.g., the building being renovated in 15 years) in establishing the end of life used for lighting calculations. This would allow specifiers to more easily distinguish between products with different lumen depreciation characteristics and design systems that are more energy-efficient over their lifetime.

Instead of giving lumen maintenance in terms of L70, it may be more useful for manufacturers to report the lumen maintenance at a given number of hours of use — such as at 25,000 hours, which is already being adopted by the LED Lighting Facts® program. This would allow for expedient product comparisons using manufacturer literature.

Although it may seem a prudent approach for a relatively unproven technology such as SSL, there are considerable consequences to capping the LLD for LEDs at 0.70. Effectively applying the same LLD to all LED products ignores the large variation in performance and is inconsistent with current methodology for characterizing other lighting systems. Long-term test data show that 0.70 is far too conservative for some LED products and hinders efforts to ensure specification of high-quality products. But the current link between LED rated lifetime and lumen maintenance effectively precludes the use of traditional methods for calculating LLDs.

Any revised method for determining LLDs should be consistent across different light-source technologies and allow for effective comparisons of product performance, so that specifiers can differentiate products with less depreciation over time. In turn, this can save substantial amounts of energy and provide a more pleasing visual environment.

For a much more in-depth treatment of this important topic, please see the full article, which is accessible from the DOE SSL website.

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IESNY Announces Winners of 2014 New York City Student Lighting Competition

Out of an unprecedented 160 student submissions from the New York City-area, “Livre Noir,” designed by Esli Teker, attending Parsons The New School of Design, won First Prize in the…

studentOut of an unprecedented 160 student submissions from the New York City-area, “Livre Noir,” designed by Esli Teker, attending Parsons The New School of Design, won First Prize in the Illuminating Engineering Society New York City Section’s (IESNYC) 14th annual Student Lighting Competition. Teker’s project, “Livre Noir,” can be described as a book that’s full of secrets and these confidences can only be read once the book is touched and it becomes illuminated. The installation engages several of the senses and beckons interaction. By touching the “black book,” it produces different colors and elicits various moods. As viewer flip through the pages of the book, they are invited to share their own feelings. Teker will receive a cash award of $2,000 from the section.

Second prize was awarded to Pratt Institute’s Ia-Chi Pan and third prize went to Jordan Ringdahl also of Pratt, who will receive $1,000 and $500 respectively.

Additionally, four students and their projects received honorable mentions.

The Student Lighting Competition, which is one of the IESNYC’s signature events, demonstrates the section’s support for students and lighting programs. This year’s event was held in honor of Patricia DiMaggio (1964-2014), LC, a lighting project design manager at Osram Sylvania and a lighting educator at New York School of Interior Design (NYSID). DiMaggio started the Student Lighting Competition during her tenure as president of the IESNYC (2004-2005). The section is establishing a fund that will continue to give financial assistance to lighting students, a cause championed by DiMaggio.

As in previous years, students were tasked to apply their education, ingenuity, and skills in order to take an elusive concept and transform it into a three-dimensional illuminated visual experience. “This year’s theme asked students if they could ‘touch with their eyes’ and challenged them to consider how light conveys the sensation of touch,” says Erin Gussert, LEED AP, lighting designer at Kugler Ning Lighting Design and co-chair of the IESNYC Student Lighting Design Competition.

Check out the winners here:

IES 2014 Student Competition Winners from Colin Weber on Vimeo.

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Product Monday: Light-Emitting Acoustic Ceiling by Philips and Ecophon

Lighting manufacturer Philips and Saint-Gobain Ecophon, a global supplier of acoustic systems, recently launched a new version of their jointly developed light-emitting acoustic ceiling. The new SoundLight Comfort Ceiling Tunable…

Lighting manufacturer Philips and Saint-Gobain Ecophon, a global supplier of acoustic systems, recently launched a new version of their jointly developed light-emitting acoustic ceiling. The new SoundLight Comfort Ceiling Tunable White enables dynamic lighting, designed to support the human body’s natural biorhythm to aid wellbeing and productivity. It is based upon the known benefits of SoundLight Comfort Ceiling launched in 2012.

SoundLight Comfort Ceiling Tunable White incorporates programmable lighting controls that change the brightness and warmth of office lighting throughout the working day. This supports employees’ energy levels, which can be diminished by spending too much time indoors. SoundLight Comfort Ceiling Tunable White helps to reverse this by simulating “daylight inside” and helping to maintain the body’s natural connection to the sun.

The light-emitting ceiling also enables a more stimulating, inspiring and attractive open plan office environment by limiting ceiling clutter and creating the impression of a bigger space, while its acoustic nature minimizes noise disturbance. It is designed to be easy to install in either new or existing offices.

Click here to learn more.

Here’s a video describing the SoundLight Comfort Ceiling:

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Precision-Paragon Publishes Retrofit Guide

Lighting manufacturer Precision-Paragon [P2] has published a guide to help building owners and lighting professionals identify and maximize potential sources of energy savings. The 21-page publication, “6 Steps to Getting…

P2Lighting manufacturer Precision-Paragon [P2] has published a guide to help building owners and lighting professionals identify and maximize potential sources of energy savings. The 21-page publication, “6 Steps to Getting the Most From Every Lighting Retrofit,” is available for free as a downloadable e-book on the lighting manufacturer’s website here.

The guide’s first chapter opens at the starting point for nearly all lighting upgrades: a one-for-one replacement, where existing fixtures are swapped out with more energy-efficient replacements. The book covers additional steps, including performing a comprehensive layout and specification, adding automatic lighting controls, addressing outdoor lighting, addressing specialty lighting, and finding and qualifying for rebates and incentives. These steps can ensure that energy savings and other benefits are maximized.

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