Month: December 2012

Product Monday: Advanced Light Hazard Meter by Gigahertz-Optik

The committee members involved in writing ANSI/IESNA RP-27.2-00, IEC/DIN/EN 62471 (CIE S 009) & DIN EN 14255-1 Photobiological safety of lamps and lamp systems-measurement techniques recognized that lamp manufacturers and…

The committee members involved in writing ANSI/IESNA RP-27.2-00, IEC/DIN/EN 62471 (CIE S 009) & DIN EN 14255-1 Photobiological safety of lamps and lamp systems-measurement techniques recognized that lamp manufacturers and distributors, safety engineers and industrial hygienists tasked with optical radiation health hazard assessment require a portable, accurate and cost effective means of metrology.

Subsequently, the use of filter radiometers, with some restrictions, was written into the standard as an alternative measurement method to the more complex, stationary and expensive spectroradiometric method.

Gigahertz-Optik’s X1-3 Light Hazard Meter with the XD-45-HUV UV-Hazard Detector, XD-45-HB BLUE-Light Hazard Detector and XD-45-HB-SRT200 FOV & Distance Adapter fulfills this requirement for a handy field portable meter for product classification and light hazard assessment.

Four channel technology with an alphanumeric four line backlit display allows the X1-3 to operate and read-out the two separate multi-sensor/filter detectors required to conform to IEC 62471 guidelines for both UV and Blue light hazard assessment.

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Philips and Light Collective Offer Crowd-Source and Image-Based App for Lighting Designers to Share Inspiration

The LightCollector app from Philips and Light Collective is based upon two lighting design fundamentals: the desire to be inspired and the need to store the things that inspire us…

The LightCollector app from Philips and Light Collective is based upon two lighting design fundamentals: the desire to be inspired and the need to store the things that inspire us so we can use them when required. LightCollector is an opportunity to create a crowd sourced global image collection for the professional lighting industry sharing to aid greater knowledge, ease of working and collective creativity.

Martin Lupton and Sharon Stammers from the lighting consultancy Light Collective explain the concept:

“We know how often we trawl our image library to find the perfect image to illustrate our concept to our client. We know that somewhere, in the depths of our not-quite-adequately filed hard drive we have that photograph we once took, in that city we once visited, of daylight transmitted through a stained glass window and creating an explosion of colour on the floor. Finding the image allows us to explain what we are trying to achieve in our design. LightCollector is a resource for collecting these light based images.”

The result is an easy to use app that will enable lighting and design professionals to speed up their image searching requirements and to feed their creative need for inspiration. As a mobile enabled tool, it allows use of the App while on the go on both Apple and Android platforms. The app is the key to initial involvement in LightCollector but the web interface is equally important.

Click here or here to learn more. Download the app for Android in the Google-Play store here and for Apple phones at iTunes here.

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IALD Survey Validates Domains of Practice for Architectural Lighting Designers

Independent of country of residence, the 637 building/design industry practitioners responding to the IALD Certification Survey indicate the seven domains of professional practice researched by the Credentialing Task Force accurately…

Independent of country of residence, the 637 building/design industry practitioners responding to the IALD Certification Survey indicate the seven domains of professional practice researched by the Credentialing Task Force accurately reflect the practice of architectural lighting design (average rating 4.1 out of 5) and are important to the profession (average rating 4.66).

The primary purpose of the certification survey was to determine how well the proposed domains of professional practice reflect what competent architectural designers do. The task force identified seven domains over the course of its two years of research [Table 1 : Domains of Practice]. Respondents were asked to rate how well the domains describe what practitioners do and to rate the importance of the specific domain to the profession on a scale of 0-5, with 0 corresponding to “not at all” and 5 meaning “very” [Table 2 : Overall Mean Rankings]. The task force is now conducting a pilot study to test the assessment process for an evidence-based certification for architectural lighting designers based on the domains of practice.

Geographic spread of respondents was diverse, with more than 36 countries represented by design/build practitioners answering the survey. A majority of respondents had 12 or more years of experience. When asked about their primary role, 67% chose architectural lighting designer from a list of 27 roles. The next most frequently cited roles were engineer (8.6%), manufacturer (5.8%), live events (4.4%), educator (4.1%) and architect (3%). Among the architectural lighting designers responding to the survey, 63.4% were male and 34.8% were female.

Of particular interest was the diversity of practice amongst responding architectural lighting designers. On average, respondents selected five areas of practice from a list of 18 choices. The most frequently selected practice areas were commercial (82%), hospitality (62%), cultural (60%), residential (55%), institutions (54%), healthcare (43%), entertainment (35%), finance (30%), research (29%) and sporting events (26%).

For more information about the IALD Credentialing Task Force’s ongoing work to develop a certification in architectural lighting design, click here. The site contains frequently asked questions about certification, an organizational update detailing current actions of the task force, and a series of resources on credentialing.

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Fulham Sponsors Lighting Sculptor Chris Bell with WorkHorse Fluorescent Ballasts

Chris Bell, a professional artist and adjunct professor at Stanford University, often uses light as part of his sculptural toolkit. Believing fluorescent lamps have been overlooked as a medium for…

Chris Bell, a professional artist and adjunct professor at Stanford University, often uses light as part of his sculptural toolkit. Believing fluorescent lamps have been overlooked as a medium for creating art, he developed unique rubber connectors from a mold of his own design, allowing him to achieve architectural sculptures using the lamps in various cohesive formations. His latest creation, installed as part of the Zero1 Art & Technology Festival at the Performance Art Institute in San Francisco, CA, is currently on exhibition through January 15, 2013. It is 13 feet wide and suspended 20 feet in the air through use of a steel frame. To illuminate the fluorescent tubes in this sculpture, Fulham donated WorkHorse fluorescent ballasts suitable for the project. The WorkHorse series of just 10 ballasts operate approximately 132 lamps in 860 combinations.

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THE ILLUMINATOR Debuts

Produced by German lighting designer Gerd Pfarré and graphic designer and ad agency owner Frank Koschembar, THE ILLUMINATOR is a new 100 x 70 cm magazine about the role of…

Produced by German lighting designer Gerd Pfarré and graphic designer and ad agency owner Frank Koschembar, THE ILLUMINATOR is a new 100 x 70 cm magazine about the role of light in culture, art, architecture and design. The magazine, which recently debuted with its first issue (and which subsequently received a glowing review in THE NEW YORK TIMES), is published in German and English.

From the editors:

“In the first issue of ILLUMINATOR molecular biologist Heike Körber provides a fascinating insight into the future of bioluminescent light sources. Berlin artist Anne Kathrin Greiner presents several of her ″Disziplinierten Räume″ (Disciplined Spaces), photographs, which have a special charm all of their own. Readers can also see a breathtaking stage set by Max Keller, the master of theatrical lighting. Gerd Pfarré met the ″poet of light″ Ingo Maurer for a friendly interview over a Fernet, and Mark Major, one of the most successful lighting designers in the world, has written a very personal and exclusive report for the first issue. Last but not least: James Turrell. Never before have his works been displayed as generously as in ILLUMINATOR!”

The magazine sells for 49 euros per copy. For more information, click here.

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Product Monday: LLHP Premium LED High Bay by Columbia Lighting

Columbia Lighting’s LLHP is a premium LED linear high bay fixture designed for durability, energy savings and performance and ideal for demanding environments such as sports complexes, warehouses, manufacturing facilities,…

Columbia Lighting’s LLHP is a premium LED linear high bay fixture designed for durability, energy savings and performance and ideal for demanding environments such as sports complexes, warehouses, manufacturing facilities, commercial farm buildings and indoor recreational spaces.

Providing up to 98 lumens per watt at 70 CRI, LLHP outperforms traditional HID lighting by reducing energy use, extending life and improving light quality. Its 50,000-hour L80 lumen maintenance reduces life cycle maintenance costs, and it offers a 50% energy reduction in input watts compared to traditional HID sources. Its “instant on” capability facilitates the use of occupancy sensors by eliminating the slow restrike time associated with HID. It is available in 4000K or 5000K, fixed output or 0-10V dimming, and other options such as an occupancy sensor and integrated wiHUBB wireless control system.

The LLHP housing is made from anodized, extruded aluminum designed to absorb and deflect impact, as well as acting as a heat sink. This heat sink finish combines with a cool light engine, and aluminum clad LED driver enclosure to add strength and structural integrity, while protecting against heat. Downward sloping fins maximize thermal management and inhibit the accumulation of particles and debris. The power supply is dual encased for maximum protection. Aisle, medium and wide distribution choices ensure that light is directed where needed whether illuminating aisles, open areas or stacks.

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NEMA Publishes ANSI ANSLG C78.377 Specifications for the Chromaticity of Solid State Lighting Products

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published ANSI ANSLG C38.377 Specifications for the Chromaticity of Solid State Lighting Products. This publication specifies the range of chromaticities recommended for general…

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published ANSI ANSLG C38.377 Specifications for the Chromaticity of Solid State Lighting Products.

This publication specifies the range of chromaticities recommended for general lighting with solid state lighting (SSL) products and advises customers of their white light chromaticities. This vital information applies to chromaticity standards and definitions and specifications of the color rendering index. C78.377 applies to LED-based SSL products with control electronics and heat sinks with AC main power or DC voltage power. It covers fixtures incorporating light sources and integrated LED lamps.

Click here to view the contents and scope of C78.377-2011. A hard or electronic copy may be purchased for $84 by visiting global.ihs.com, or by contacting IHS at 800-854-7179 (U.S.) or 303-397-7956 (international).

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Architecture Billings Index Positive for Third Straight Month

Billings at architecture firms accelerated to their strongest pace of growth since December 2010. As a leading economic indicator of construction activity, the Architecture Billings Index (ABI), produced by the…

Billings at architecture firms accelerated to their strongest pace of growth since December 2010. As a leading economic indicator of construction activity, the Architecture Billings Index (ABI), produced by the American Institute of Architects (AIA), reflects the approximate 9- to 12-month lag time between architecture billings and construction spending. AIA reported the October ABI score was 52.8, up from the mark of 51.6 in September. This score reflects an increase in demand for design services (any score above 50 indicates an increase in billings). The new projects inquiry index was 59.4, compared to a mark of 57.3 the previous month.

“With three straight monthly gains – and the past two being quite strong – it’s beginning to look like demand for design services has turned the corner,” said AIA Chief Economist, Kermit Baker, PhD, Hon. AIA. “With 2012 winding down on an upnote, and with the national elections finally behind us, there is a general sense of optimism. However, this is balanced by a tremendous amount of anxiety and uncertainty in the marketplace, which likely means that we’ll have a few more bumps before we enter a full-blown expansion.”

Key October ABI highlights:

• Regional averages: South (52.8), Northeast (52.6), West (51.8), Midwest (50.8)

• Sector index breakdown: multi-family residential (59.6), mixed practice (52.4), institutional (51.4), commercial / industrial (48.0)

• Project inquiries index: 59.4

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Research: Blue Light Could Help Teenagers Combat Stress

Adolescents can be chronically sleep deprived because of their inability to fall asleep early in combination with fixed wakeup times on school days. According to the CDC, almost 70 percent…

Adolescents can be chronically sleep deprived because of their inability to fall asleep early in combination with fixed wakeup times on school days. According to the CDC, almost 70 percent of school children get insufficient sleep—less than 8 hours on school nights. This type of restricted sleep schedule has been linked with depression, behavior problems, poor performance at school, drug use and automobile accidents. A new study from the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute shows that exposure to morning short-wavelength “blue” light has the potential to help sleep-deprived adolescents prepare for the challenges of the day and deal with stress, more so than dim light.

The study, funded by Sharp Laboratories of America, was a collaboration between Associate Professor and Director of the LRC Light and Health Program Mariana Figueiro and LRC Director and Professor Mark S. Rea. Results of the study, titled, “Short-Wavelength Light Enhances Cortisol Awakening Response in Sleep-Restricted Adolescents,” were recently published in the open access International Journal of Endocrinology.

Levels of cortisol, a hormone produced by the adrenal gland, follow a daily 24-hour rhythm. Cortisol concentrations are low throughout the day reaching a broad minimum in the evening before rising slowly again throughout the night. In addition to this gradual elevation of cortisol at night, cortisol levels rise sharply within the first 30 to 60 minutes after waking. This is known as the cortisol awakening response (CAR). In nocturnal animals, the cortisol spike occurs at night, at the start of activity. It appears to be associated with the time of transition from rest to activity, upon waking. A high CAR has been associated with better preparedness for stressful and challenging activities.

“The present results are the first to show that low levels of short-wavelength light enhance CAR in adolescents who were restricted from sleep,” said Figueiro. “Morning light exposure may help to wake up the body when it is time to be active, thus preparing individuals for any environmental stress they might experience.”

Short-wavelength light has been shown to maximally suppress production of nocturnal melatonin and phase shift the timing of the biological clock. The effect of short-wavelength light on other biomarkers has not been widely studied.

The study included three overnight sessions, at least one week apart. All participants wore a Dimesimeter on a wrist band to measure light exposure and to verify the regularity of their activity/rest periods during the three-week study. The Dimesimeter is a small calibrated light meter device developed by the LRC that continuously records circadian light and activity levels. During the study, adolescents aged 12 to 17 years went to sleep at 1:30 a.m. and woke up at 6:00 a.m., a 4.5-hour sleep opportunity. Each week, participants either experienced morning short-wavelength blue light (40 lux of 470-nanometer light) or remained in dim light.

“We found that exposure to short-wavelength blue light in the morning significantly enhances CAR in sleep deprived adolescents, more so than dim light,” said Rea. “Morning exposure to short-wavelength light may be a simple, yet practical way to better prepare adolescents for the challenges of the day.”

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