Month: September 2012

P2 Graphic Provides Pictorial Comparison of Light Source Technologies

This interesting infographic from P2 (Precision Lighting and Paragon Lighting) provides a quick comparison of light source technologies. [P2] Energy Efficient Lighting

This interesting infographic from P2 (Precision Lighting and Paragon Lighting) provides a quick comparison of light source technologies.

Energy Efficient Lighting Comparison Infographic

[P2] Energy Efficient Lighting

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DOE Releases GATEWAY Report on Museum LED Retrofit Lighting

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has published the final evaluation report from a retrofit of track lighting at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. During the demonstration,…

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has published the final evaluation report from a retrofit of track lighting at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. During the demonstration, LED PAR 30 and MR16 lamps replaced all traditional incandescent lamps in one gallery and LED PAR 38 and MR16 lamps partially replaced incandescent lamps in two other galleries. This GATEWAY demonstration report describes the selection and testing process, technology challenges, perceptions, economics, energy use, and mixed results of using LED replacement lamps in art galleries housing national treasures.

Key findings include:

* The museum was able to achieve very satisfactory visual results in terms of both color and composition with LED lamps, despite some issues with equivalency, beam angles, and compatibility with the museum’s low-voltage track heads and dimming control system. The museum’s incandescent lamps could not be replaced one-for-one, but the variety of LED lamps available offered new opportunities to tailor the lighting effects for the specific art works.

* Power use in the gallery completely relamped with LEDs decreased from 3.9 to 1.1 watts per square foot, reducing electricity costs from $2,984 to $816 per year and recovering the higher initial cost of the LEDs in 16 months of operation through energy savings alone.

* Spot-relamping frequency and cost were reduced considerably because of the LED’s longer expected life. A 10-year life-cycle cost analysis including maintenance savings, at $0.14 per kWh melded electric rate, found a total present value energy savings of $19,041, with a total present value life-cycle cost savings of $27,891.

* Samples of three LED replacement lamp types used in one gallery were sent for baseline photometric testing and are scheduled for follow-up testing after 4000, 8000, and 12,000 hours of use. The PAR 30 lamps tested at 4000 hours remained very stable in terms of color and moderately stable in terms of light output, but the MR16 LED lamps exhibited more change in terms of lumen output and color.

The report—which also includes the lighting designer’s lessons learned and wish list for LED museum lighting—is available for download here.

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LightShow East to be Held October 3-4 in Washington, DC

LightShow East will be staging October 3 and 4 at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. Offering free admission to qualified attendees, this trade show and conference offers lighting…

LightShow East will be staging October 3 and 4 at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C.

Offering free admission to qualified attendees, this trade show and conference offers lighting specifiers the opportunity to see the latest lighting products from more than 80 manufacturers who will be showing hundreds of products.

Attendees will be able to participate in a choice of 24 conference seminars on topics ranging from daylighting to museum lighting and LEDs to sustainable lighting. All of the seminars are AIA approved and registered with the NCQLP.

Networking opportunities will also be available during the event, including a complimentary wine and cheese reception on the show floor at 5:00 PM on Wednesday, October 3.

LightShow East is based on the model of the biennial LightShow West, which launched in 2003 to serve the West Coast lighting marketplace.

Online registration will be open through September 29, 2012 here.

At-show registration will be open 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM on Wednesday, October 3 and 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM on Thursday, October 4. Complete information can be found on the show’s website here.

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DesignLights Consortium Receives U.S. Department of Energy Partner Recognition

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has given special recognition to Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP) as an LED Lighting Facts program partner for its dedication to promote the LED…

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has given special recognition to Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP) as an LED Lighting Facts program partner for its dedication to promote the LED lighting industry through its project, the DesignLights Consortium (DLC). The DLC, a collaboration of utility efficiency programs and regional energy efficiency organizations throughout the United States and Canada, is the premier resource for high-quality, energy efficient commercial lighting design and information.

Central to the DLC’s work is its Solid-State Lighting Qualified Products List (QPL), a listing of LED luminaires that meet strict energy efficiency and performance criteria, administered by the DLC. Being listed on the DLC QPL is a preliminary requirement for utility incentive eligibility throughout the DLC member territory. The DLC enables manufacturers to fill out one application to access incentives at more than 50 DLC member utilities. The DLC QPL also provides assurance to utility program managers that the products they are incentivizing will meet their efficiency goals and satisfy their customers’ expectations. To date, there are over 13,000 high efficient products listed on the QPL, eligible for utility incentives.

The DOE’s LED Lighting Facts is a program whose mission is to assure that LED lighting products are represented accurately in the market. Participants submit technical information about their products, and LED Lighting Facts verifies the accuracy of that information. Participants pledge to use the LED Lighting Facts label to document the performance of products they manufacture, sell, distribute, or promote.

“The immense growth of QPL is a direct reflection of the upsurge of the overall SSL market,” said Jon Linn, Commercial Programs Manager at NEEP. “With over 12,000 products now on the QPL, it is mind boggling to think of the choices consumers have when designing lighting systems, considering that the QPL listed just 1,000 products a year ago. That is why collaborations such as the DLC and LED Lighting Facts are vital as information resources for speeding high-performance, energy-efficient lighting products to market.”

The DLC will continue to collaborate with LED Lighting Facts and drive the growth of qualified products to provide reliable product information to utilities and their customers. The DLC requires manufacturers to list their products with LED Lighting Facts as an initial step in the DLC QPL application process, and the DLC works with LED Lighting Facts on verified technical product data for determining whether a product meets the DLC QPL criteria.

Click here to learn more about the Qualified Products List.

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Exposure to Light Could Help Alzheimer’s Patients Sleep Better

Individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD) often sleep during the day and are awake at night. The situation can turn life-threatening if they leave their homes and wander…

Individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD) often sleep during the day and are awake at night. The situation can turn life-threatening if they leave their homes and wander around outside. This irregular sleep schedule and night wandering, and the consequent burden on their caretakers, is a primary reason individuals with ADRD are placed in more controlled environments such as nursing homes. A new study from the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute lays the foundation for the importance of tailored light exposures as a viable treatment option for the reduction of sleep disturbances in older adults and those with ADRD.

Funded by a R01 grant from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the study is the first to collect circadian light exposures in individuals with ADRD. Results of the quantitative study show that individuals with ADRD experienced lower light levels, exhibited lower activity levels, and had greater disruption to their natural circadian rhythms than healthy older adults. The findings also show that people with ADRD experience lower levels of light exposure and greater levels of circadian disruption during the winter.

“We used light/dark and activity/rest patterns to assess circadian disruption and our results are consistent with previous studies. However, this is the first field study to examine the synchrony between the circadian light pattern and the activity response pattern to assess circadian disruption,” said Mariana Figueiro, associate professor at Rensselaer and director of the Light and Health Program at the LRC, who led the study. “Measurements revealed that those with ADRD experienced more circadian disruption than healthy older adults.”

Results of the study, titled “Field Measurements of Light Exposures and Circadian Disruption in Two Populations of Older Adults,” will appear in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Figueiro presented the research team’s findings at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Vancouver on July 17.

Along with Figueiro, co-authors of the study are LRC Director and Professor Mark S. Rea, LRC Research Specialist Robert Hamner, along with Patricia Higgins and Thomas Hornick, clinicians at Case Western Reserve University and Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio.

Growing evidence indicates that circadian disruption by irregular light/dark patterns is associated with reduced quality of life and increased risk of disease. Circadian rhythms are governed by the human body’s master clock in what is known as the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), which has an intrinsic period slightly longer than 24 hours. On average, the SCN runs with a period of 24.2 hours. Light/dark patterns on the retina, the photosensitive part of the eye, synchronizes the SCN to the 24-hour solar day, regulating biological rhythms such as when we are active and when we sleep. Without exposure to a regular, daily pattern of light and dark, circadian rhythms can become irregular.

“Biology is driven by circadian rhythms at every level, and light is the main stimulus for synchronizing the circadian system to the solar day. By quantifying an individual’s light/dark exposure pattern, we can prescribe ‘light treatments’ promoting circadian entrainment, thereby improving health and well-being,” said Figueiro.

To collect data for the study, the research team used a Dimesimeter, a dime-sized device developed by the LRC, to record how much photopic and circadian light an individual is exposed to and whether they are active or resting. The data-logging device records these light and activity levels continuously over many days, and can be easily attached to shirt collars, lapels, hats, wristbands, or eyeglasses. The Dimesimeter enables researchers to examine light/dark and activity/rest patterns in those experiencing circadian sleep disorders, such as Alzheimer’s patients. Data from the device can be downloaded to a computer and processed to calculate a cross-correlation of the activity/rest and light/dark exposure data, a measure of circadian entrainment/disruption.

“The Dimesimeter system allows researchers to accurately measure light/dark exposure and activity/rest patterns to quantify circadian disruption. In this way, we can collect ecological data on populations who suffer from circadian sleep disorders,” said Rea. “This new study using the Dimesimeter is a major step toward the goal of better understanding the impact of circadian disruption on human health.”

For the new NIA-funded study, the research team enlisted 16 healthy older adults and 21 adults with ADRD to wear a Dimesimeter on their wrists for one week. The research team in Cleveland collected data from those with ADRD and the research team in Troy collected the data from healthy older adults. From the resulting data, the researchers calculated two metrics for each subject: relative activity (RA) to measure activity, and phasor magnitude to measure both light exposure and activity. The analysis revealed that during winter, those with ADRD exhibited more circadian disruption than healthy adults as reflected by their significantly shorter phasor magnitudes and lower RA values. Those with ADRD studied in winter also had significantly shorter phasor magnitudes than those studied in summer. ADRD adults were less active during waking hours than healthy adults, and ADRD adults studied in winter were exposed to less light than healthy adults in winter and ADRD adults in summer. The research team is currently delivering a lighting intervention to those with ADRD and their caretakers and measuring its impact on their sleep efficiency and circadian disruption.

Looking forward, the Dimesimeter could one day allow physicians to predict the optimum timing of the light therapy necessary to resynchronize the circadian phase with the solar day. Such treatments could range from going outdoors for 15 minutes to sitting in front of a light box fitted with blue LEDs for a prescribed amount of time, according to Figueiro.

Last year, international magazine The Scientist named the LRC’s Dimesimeter as one of the “Top 10 Innovations of 2011.”

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Product Monday: Surgical Suite Lighting by Acuity Brands

Acuity Brands, Inc. recently introduced the Healthcare Lighting (acquired by Acuity in May 2011) Surg5 surgical troffer luminaire, designed to provide energy-efficient, long-life supplemental illumination in surgical suites, typically mounted…

Acuity Brands, Inc. recently introduced the Healthcare Lighting (acquired by Acuity in May 2011) Surg5 surgical troffer luminaire, designed to provide energy-efficient, long-life supplemental illumination in surgical suites, typically mounted in arrays surrounding the perimeter of the operating table. The Surg5 luminaire is designed to deliver the equivalent light output of a 6-lamp fluorescent troffer while requiring only 5 lamps. The elimination of one lamp within the fixture also allows a design with more accessible placement of the ballast for faster and more cost-effective maintenance.

Typical surgical troffers require the removal of all lamps and reflectors to access ballasts. In the Surg5 luminaire, these components are readily accessible on each side after simply opening the sealed door frame and removing the tool-free ballast tray covers. The lamps stay in place during ballast maintenance, reducing the risk of glass breakage, which is especially important in a critical-care area of a hospital.

surg5

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Lumen Awards 2012

Presented by The New York City Section of the Illuminating Engineering Society (IESNYC), the Lumen Awards recognize excellence, professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting designs that have transformed some of…

Cornell University, Milstein Hall.

Presented by The New York City Section of the Illuminating Engineering Society (IESNYC), the Lumen Awards recognize excellence, professionalism, ingenuity and originality in lighting designs that have transformed some of the world’s most prestigious buildings and spaces.

Ten Lumen Awards in three categories were presented: the Lumen Award of Excellence, the highest level of recognition for permanent architectural application; the Lumen Award of Merit, meritorious recognition in permanent architectural application; and the Lumen Citation, special recognition awards for an art installation, technical detail, portion of a single project, temporary installation or other work. A commemoration was also made to Stan Deutsch Associates in celebration of their 50th anniversary, as well as their significant contributions to the IES.

Claremont University Consortium.

Judging this year’s entries were William Armstrong, Principal, William Armstrong Lighting Design; David Cyr, LC, MIES, IALD, Associate, George Sexton Associates; Chad Groshart, IALD, IES, Associate and Global Practice Leader for Lighting, Atelier Ten; Alicia Kapheim, Lighting Industry Consultant, AbundantIllumination; Charles Linn, FAIA, Architect, Journalist and Author; Attila Uysal, Principal, SBLD Studio; and Susannah Zweighaft, LEED AP, PLDA, CLEP, LC – Partner, AKF Group, LLP.

All of this year’s winners can be viewed here.

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HID Lamp Shipment Indexes Show Growth for First Quarter of 2012

NEMA’s shipment indexes for HID lamps returned to positive growth territory during the first quarter of 2012, with each lamp type showing year-over-year gains following negative growth to close out…

NEMA’s shipment indexes for HID lamps returned to positive growth territory during the first quarter of 2012, with each lamp type showing year-over-year gains following negative growth to close out the final quarter of 2011. Sodium vapor lamps increased 2.9%, while shipments of mercury vapor and metal halide HID lamps increased 5% and 0.1%, respectively.

Market shares varied slightly among the three lamp types. Sodium and mercury vapor lamps increased by 0.5 and 0.1 percentage points to 32.8% and 4.6%, respectively. Metal halide lamps posted a share of 62.5, a decline of 0.7 percentage points on a year-over-year basis.

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Johnson Controls Survey Finds Global Energy Management Interest Reaches All-Time High

Eighty-five percent of building owners and operators globally depend on energy management to drive operational efficiency, according to the 2012 Johnson Controls Energy Efficiency Indicator, a global survey of 3,500…

Eighty-five percent of building owners and operators globally depend on energy management to drive operational efficiency, according to the 2012 Johnson Controls Energy Efficiency Indicator, a global survey of 3,500 building owners and operators. This represents a 34-point increase in the last two years.

Energy cost savings and financial incentives are leading this shift, but more than half say they are also looking to improve their public image and increase the value of their buildings.

“Building owners are investing in energy efficiency because they recognize the financial payback,” said Dave Myers, president of Johnson Controls, Building Efficiency. “This year’s survey demonstrates there’s a change underway. The mantra for commercial real estate owners used to be location, location, location – now it’s becoming location, efficiency, location.”

According to the survey, nearly a third of respondents indicated tax credits, incentives and rebates have the greatest impact on increasing investment in energy efficiency. This finding underscores the role of government policy in the decision making of building owners and operators. That figure jumps to 42 percent in the U.S., where building owners and operators need to address aging and inefficient buildings.

“Nearly 75 percent of commercial buildings in the United States are more than 20 years old and are ready for energy improvements. Building owners and operators are looking to lawmakers to bring down the cost of energy retrofits through incentives and rebates,” said Myers. “In Asia, building codes and equipment standards also are helping ensure new buildings are constructed to high performance levels.”

Developing countries are setting the pace with respect to investment with the highest number of respondents – 81 percent in China and 74 percent in India – planning to increase investments in energy efficiency or renewable energy. Globally, 40 percent of energy is consumed by buildings, according to the World Resources Institute. Ninety-six percent of respondents have implemented at least one building efficiency improvement, led by lighting, heating and air conditioning equipment and controls, and water efficiency. Half of the private sector respondents use the cost savings from energy efficiency upgrades to reduce the company’s overall budget while 40 percent reinvest in further energy efficiency measures.

Green building certifications, or voluntary rating systems, are on the rise with 44 percent planning to certify existing buildings, up from 35 percent the year before. Further, 43 percent plan to certify new construction projects.

“Tenants are willing to pay more to locate their offices in energy efficient buildings,” said Myers. The survey found nearly a quarter of those who responded are willing to pay a premium for space in a certified green building.

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