Month: March 2012

Jim Brodrick on The Life-Cycle Energy Consumption of LED Lamps

Guest post by Jim Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy Although LED lighting has many potential advantages, energy savings is the one that attracts the most attention. But the energy savings…

Guest post by Jim Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy

Although LED lighting has many potential advantages, energy savings is the one that attracts the most attention. But the energy savings during the course of a product’s lifetime only tell part of the story. To gauge a product’s full impact – not only in terms of energy consumption, but also on the environment – its whole life cycle has to be considered, from cradle to grave.

Recognizing this, DOE has launched a three-part effort to assess the total life-cycle impact of LED screw-based replacement lamps, comparing them with conventional lighting technologies. A report on Part 1, Review of the Life-Cycle Energy Consumption of Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent, and LED Lamps, was published this week. It’s based on existing life-cycle assessment literature of lighting products (including academic publications as well as manufacturer and independent research reports) and looks at three life-cycle phases – manufacturing, transportation (from factory to retailer), and use – comparing the energy consumed and considering how that consumption might change in the future for LED lamps.

The second part of the project should be completed this summer and involves a life-cycle environmental analysis of the direct and indirect material and process inputs to make the LED products. The third and final part of the life-cycle effort, which is expected to be finished by October, involves taking the products apart and chemically testing them using existing testing standards, to determine what materials they contain, and in what concentrations. A final report will combine the results of all three analyses to provide a basis for comparing the full environmental tradeoffs between LED and conventional lighting sources.

So what did we learn from Part 1 of the project? Well, for one thing, the average life-cycle energy consumption of LED lamps and CFLs is similar, and is about one-fourth the consumption of incandescent lamps. But looking further down the road, if LED lamps meet their performance targets by 2015, their life-cycle energy is expected to decrease by approximately one-half, giving them a distinct advantage over CFLs, which are at a more advanced stage of development in terms of energy performance and thus not likely to improve as much as LEDs.

As might be expected, the “use” phase of all three types of lamps dominates the results, accounting for 90 percent of total life-cycle energy, on average. This is followed by the manufacturing and transport phases respectively, with transport representing less than one percent of the life-cycle energy for all lamp types. Not all of the literature is in agreement about the energy consumption of LED package manufacturing, which various sources estimate at anywhere from 0.1 percent to 27 percent of life-cycle energy use, with the average – estimated after considering the strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches – being 7 percent.

The Part 1 study only considers LED replacement lamps, although integrated luminaires designed specifically for SSL can take much better advantage of the technology and thus produce efficacies beyond those of even the best-in-class LED replacements. Parts 2 and 3 will address both replacement lamps and integrated luminaires. Part 1 confirms that the cradle-to-grave energy performance of an LED is roughly equivalent to current CFLs, with most of the energy consumption occurring during the operation of the LED. Future work will focus on the uncertainty associated with the manufacturing process and environmental assessment of LEDs.

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Electroindustry Business Confidence Index for February North American Business Conditions Hits Six-Year High

NEMA’s Electroindustry Business Confidence Index (EBCI) for current North American conditions jumped sharply in February, rising more than 18 points to 72.5, its highest level in more than six years….

NEMA’s Electroindustry Business Confidence Index (EBCI) for current North American conditions jumped sharply in February, rising more than 18 points to 72.5, its highest level in more than six years. Meanwhile, the EBCI for future North American conditions, though remaining firmly positive, retreated slightly in February. The index slipped a little more than 4 points to 75 following a combined increase of nearly 20 points in December and January.

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Incandescent Lamp Shipments Remain Robust During Third Quarter of 2011

NEMA’s incandescent lamps shipment index for Q3 2011 decreased 1.2% from the previous quarter, but was up 21.5% compared to the same period last year. The year-over-year percentage (y/y) change…

NEMA’s incandescent lamps shipment index for Q3 2011 decreased 1.2% from the previous quarter, but was up 21.5% compared to the same period last year. The year-over-year percentage (y/y) change is the largest swing, in either direction, since 2008. Compact fluorescent lamp shipments registered a slight gain of 0.9% over Q2 2011. Yet, the index declined for the fourth consecutive y/y comparison, sinking 15.4%.

Shares of the two lamp types were essentially unchanged compared to the previous quarter. Incandescent lamps decreased 0.4 percentage points to 79.4%. Meanwhile, CFLs increased marginally to reach 20.6% of the combined incandescent–CFL lamp market.

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New ENERGY STAR Luminaire Specification to Take Effect April 1, 2012

Version 1.1 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ENERGY STAR product specifications for solid-state luminaires will take effect on April 1, 2012, and replace the existing Residential Light Fixtures…

Version 1.1 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ENERGY STAR product specifications for solid-state luminaires will take effect on April 1, 2012, and replace the existing Residential Light Fixtures (RLF, V4.2) and Solid State Lighting Luminaires (SSL, V1.3) specifications. The lamps specification in is still under development, which is expected to consolidate the LED integral replacement lamp and compact fluorescent lamp specifications into a single specification.

EPA-recognized testing facilities were asked to stop certifying new products under the old luminaire specifications (Residential Light Fixtures V4.2 and Solid State Lighting Luminaires V1.3) on September 15, 2011. All products manufactured on or after April 1, 2012, must be certified under the new Luminaires V1.1 specification in order to use the ENERGY STAR label.

Click here for more information.

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Product Monday: Fitted Louver Options by a•light

a•light, an AmerillumBrands company, has introduced the FIT Louver, a series of new integral design fitted louver downlight options for Accolade Series energy-saving linear fluorescents with 3-in. apertures. The FIT…

a•light, an AmerillumBrands company, has introduced the FIT Louver, a series of new integral design fitted louver downlight options for Accolade Series energy-saving linear fluorescents with 3-in. apertures. The FIT (“Fine Intersecting Technology”) Louver option is a broad display, parabolically controlled unit, emitting more light without glare, yet are lower in height, for a low-scale architectural appearance that complements accolade Series energy-saving linear fluorescents in cable-suspended, direct ceiling or recessed mountings. Louver blades are flat, less bulky, exquisitely designed and finished in a matte satin white or matte, low-glare, specular aluminum, in four-foot increments per linear fluorescent light fixture.

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ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR Publishes Article About Electrodeless Lighting

Electrodeless lamps do not require wiring connections between the lamp and its ballast or driver. As most wear and tear on lamps occurs at the electrode, its absence in this…

Image courtesy of Topanga Technologies

Electrodeless lamps do not require wiring connections between the lamp and its ballast or driver. As most wear and tear on lamps occurs at the electrode, its absence in this technology can significantly extend lamp life.

This article I wrote for ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR breaks down the different types, from induction lamps to plasma lamps.

Not the article contains an error, which is that while Dura-One is listed in the Sylvania online catalog as a category, it was officially de-listed by the company some time ago. Additionally, as an update, Sylvania has added 40W, 70W and 200W models to its Icetron system, and in July is expected to release a 100W dimmable model.

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NEMA Publishes NEMA SSL 4 Retrofit Lamps: Minimum Performance Requirements

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published NEMA SSL 4 Retrofit Lamps: Minimum Performance Requirements. This publication applies to integral Light Emitting Diode (LED) lamps, which are defined as…

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published NEMA SSL 4 Retrofit Lamps: Minimum Performance Requirements. This publication applies to integral Light Emitting Diode (LED) lamps, which are defined as a lamp with LEDs, an integrated LED driver, and a base that meets appropriate American National Standards and is designed to connect to the branch circuit via a lampholder/socket that meets appropriate ANSs. The criteria applies to both integral LED lamps of non-standard form, and those intended to replace standard general service incandescent lamps, decorative (candelabra style) lamps, and reflector lamps. Click here to learn more and download.

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National Lighting Bureau Launches 33rd High-Benefit Lighting Awards Program

The National Lighting Bureau has launched the 33rd annual High-Benefit Lighting Awards Program, open to virtually anyone associated with a High-Benefit Lighting installation: owners, designers, facility or property managers, contractors,…

The National Lighting Bureau has launched the 33rd annual High-Benefit Lighting Awards Program, open to virtually anyone associated with a High-Benefit Lighting installation: owners, designers, facility or property managers, contractors, manufacturer’s representatives, utility employees and users, among others.

The National Lighting Bureau coined the term High-Benefit Lighting to connote “function-focused” electric-illumination systems that are designed to fulfill the specific purposes for which they will be used, especially to maximize bottom-line returns for those who own, manage, and/or rely on the lighting.

For consideration in the 2012 High-Benefit Lighting Awards Program, an entry must be received by the National Lighting Bureau no later than October 31, 2012. An entry should document how modification of an existing lighting system or installation of a new one improved productivity, increased retail sales, or achieved any of the many other bottom-line benefits of High-Benefit Lighting.

Click here for more information.

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LIGHTING REDESIGN FOR EXISTING BUILDINGS Now Available for Amazon Kindle

I’m pleased to announce that my book LIGHTING REDESIGN FOR EXISTING BUILDINGS is now available as an eBook for Kindle on Amazon. LIGHTING REDESIGN FOR EXISTING BUILDINGS was written to…

I’m pleased to announce that my book LIGHTING REDESIGN FOR EXISTING BUILDINGS is now available as an eBook for Kindle on Amazon.

LIGHTING REDESIGN FOR EXISTING BUILDINGS was written to educate owners, energy managers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting designers, consultants, electrical contractors, electrical distributors and other interested professionals about the relighting of existing buildings. The information may apply to lighting design in new construction as well.

Click here to take a look.

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Product Monday: Lumark Crosstour LED Wall Pack Series by Cooper Lighting

Cooper Lighting has introduced the Lumark Crosstour LED Wall Pack Series, a wall-mount luminaire featuring an “all-in-one” product design to satisfy a myriad of application needs by mounting in virtually…

Cooper Lighting has introduced the Lumark Crosstour LED Wall Pack Series, a wall-mount luminaire featuring an “all-in-one” product design to satisfy a myriad of application needs by mounting in virtually any location. The product offers good optical performance, low-profile aesthetic design and easy installation while providing solutions for wall, surface, post (bollard), low-level and inverted installations. Designed to replace up to 175W metal halide fixtures with the latest energy-efficient LED technology, the Crosstour can offer up to 90% energy savings compared to equivalent metal halide wall pack products. Dark Sky Friendly, ADA Complaint, UL and cUL Wet Location listed, IP66 rated and have a projected LED life of 50,000 hours.

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