IESNYC Recognizes Winners of 15th Annual Student Competition

The Illuminating Engineering Society New York City Section’s (IESNYC) Student Lighting Competition (SLC) recognized several remarkable winners in its 15th annual competition.

“denCITY,” a design collaboration by Nura Venta, Sergio Taveras and Selin Ergeneli (Parsons The New School for Design) won the Grand Prize and cash prize of $2,000.

Second prize was awarded to Pratt Institute’s Seung Jun Kwak and third prize went to Walker Tovin also of Pratt, who will receive $1,000 and $500 respectively. In addition, five students and their projects received honorable mentions.

Students were challenged to apply their education, skills and imagination to take an elusive concept and transform it into a three-dimensional illuminated visual experience. This year’s theme, “Residual Sparks,” challenged students to build a 3-dimensional study on how light is interwoven with time and memory and how what we have seen is imprinted in memory and affects how we view the world.

Grand Prize “denCITY” by Nura Venta, Sergio Taveras, and Selin Ergeneli Parsons The New School for Design - MFA Lighting Design, Parsons The New School for Design - Nelson Jenkins, Davidson Norris, and Glenn Shrum, instructors “denCITY,” is composed of fabric shaped by volumetric forms and evokes a sense of time and memory at the large scale seen in the annual seasons, and at the same time, at a more focused scale of light throughout the day. Two layers of light, with one more diffused and in the background, provides an ambient glow, while the other is more direct and focused. This light acts as the sun from sunrise to sunset against the static nature of New York, a dense city and of a forest. The project was designed to be open to interpretation and some viewers perceived it to show the changing seasons while others thought it to be the sunrise to sunset phenomena.

Grand Prize
“denCITY” by Nura Venta, Sergio Taveras, and Selin Ergeneli Parsons The New School for Design – MFA Lighting Design, Parsons The New School for Design – Nelson Jenkins, Davidson Norris, and Glenn Shrum, instructors
“denCITY,” is composed of fabric shaped by volumetric forms and evokes a sense of time and memory at the large scale seen in the annual seasons, and at the same time, at a more focused scale of light throughout the day. Two layers of light, with one more diffused and in the background, provides an ambient glow, while the other is more direct and focused. This light acts as the sun from sunrise to sunset against the static nature of New York, a dense city and of a forest. The project was designed to be open to interpretation and some viewers perceived it to show the changing seasons while others thought it to be the sunrise to sunset phenomena.

Second Prize People Come and Go by Seung Jun Kwak Pratt Institute - BID Industrial Design- Scott Vandervoort, instructor Throughout Seung Jun Kwak‘s second prize winning “People Come and Go,” is a silhouette of a person on a flat wall representing people no longer around, but who vaguely stay in his memory.

Second Prize
People Come and Go by Seung Jun Kwak Pratt Institute – BID Industrial Design- Scott Vandervoort, instructor
Throughout Seung Jun Kwak‘s second prize winning “People Come and Go,” is a silhouette of a person on a flat wall representing people no longer around, but who vaguely stay in his memory.

Third Prize (untitled) by Walker Tovin Pratt Institute - BID Industrial Design, Willy Schwenzfeier, instructor Walker Tovin’s (untitled) third prize winning project attempts to render the contemplative nature of memory itself, recalling the times he spent as a child looking out of the rear window of a car and watching the oncoming headlights and the rain as it slide down the glass.

Third Prize
(untitled) by Walker Tovin Pratt Institute – BID Industrial Design, Willy Schwenzfeier, instructor
Walker Tovin’s (untitled) third prize winning project attempts to render the contemplative nature of memory itself, recalling the times he spent as a child looking out of the rear window of a car and watching the oncoming headlights and the rain as it slide down the glass.

FMI Reports Rising Nonresidential Construction Index Comes with Struggles

FMIThe Nonresidential Construction Index (NCRI) from FMI rose two points in Q1 to a score of 64.8. This normally is a positive economic sign. However, construction companies are facing the challenge of having enough people to keep up with increasing backlogs, warns Phil Warner, researcher for FMI.

The engineering and construction executives that comprise the NRCI panel are strongly optimistic about both the economy and their businesses. The diffusion indexes for the overall economy and the geographic economies where individual panelists do business rose more than six points, reaching 78.

The report discusses owners’ views on expectations for 2015 Construction Put In Place, top business challenges for 2015 and employment trends. Lack of a skilled workforce was among the top concerns. Other comments express some political angst. O

Click here to read the report.

Rebates for LED Replacement Lamps Drop 32%

2015 has brought a significant drop in rebates for LED replacement lamps such as PARs, MRs, A-lamps and decorative lamps, according to Briteswitch.

While the average rebate for replacement LED lamps was $11.12 in 2014, this year it dropped to $7.51, a 32% decline.

This change comes as rebate programs try to adjust their offerings to match the price decreases of many LED lamps.

On the plus side, there are many programs offering rebates. The large majority still require lamps to satisfy the most recent ENERGY STAR requirements.

LED

2014 IES Progress Report

progress

Lots of great products to peruse in the 2014 IES Progress Report. Check out the products selected here.

Product Monday: Track Light by Lighting Services Inc

LSILighting Services Inc’s SSLGR16 Series is a line-voltage luminaire designed specifically for 5W and 7.5W SORAA MR16 LED lamps with 35,000-hour life and a GU10 base. Choice of beam spreads including 10, 25, 36 and 60 degrees. It can fit up to two SORAA Snap accessories or a full range of LSI accessories. The luminaire is constructed of die-cast aluminum and can be ordered with the same or contrasting front and rear hoods for a unique design statement.

Click here to learn more.

LSI22

Ted Konnerth on the Internet of Things

Guest post by Ted Konnerth, EGRET Consulting Group

Strategies in Light held their first joint conference with the LEDShow during the last week of February. Attendance was solid and the technical conferences featured four different tracks of presentations covering arcane technical issues to overall market influences on the adoption of LED. On Tuesday, they held their Investor Forum; a mini-version of the popular Shark Tank TV show, Investor Forum features a panel of 8 investors and a rotating presentation of emerging companies.

The conference is by far the industry leader in covering all issues pertinent to LED technology. I came away from the presentations and private meetings with a long list of interesting concepts:

• LED has had over $4B of investments over the past 10+ years and most investors have lost money in the technology. The reasons for the losses varied but one comment by the investor panel was particularly notable:
• The Channel Matters. The investor explained that bringing new technology into a legacy market takes time and energy that was largely unanticipated by the newer entrants. As many of the newer companies were in a rush to revenue, they carved their own paths to market… and mostly failed. I’ve remarked several times over the past 7-8 years that selling light bulbs is a whole lot more complicated than most people believe; and relationships matter.
• M&A valuations for LED have declined. This is a direct response to the loss history. Investors are far more wary of rosy predictions and novel solutions to selling those products.
• Acquisitions have declined. The major strategic companies had a very quiet year of acquisitions in 2014 (Acuity, Eaton, Hubbell, Cree, Philips, GE). They felt that M&A may pick up steam in 2015 and as evidenced by Acuity’s eye-popping valuation for Distech this week… we may be back in acquisition mode.
• IPO’s are expected to rise; primarily fed by the much heralded spin-off of LumiLeds by Philips.
• The available market is still huge; with the replacement lamp market estimated as 45 billion sockets with only 5% filled by LED currently. Ironically, as LED replacement lamps rise, the expected peak is a forecast decline by 2022 as the LED fulfillment and long-life shrinks the market.
• The global fixture market is estimated currently at $59B with $19B being LED. The market is projected to rise to $66B by 2022.
• Low voltage distribution is rising and is seen by many companies as a large movement in the near future; with estimates of construction cost savings of $75/sq ft or more. With LED enabling the low voltage movement, I think this will become the primary mode of power distribution in homes in the near future.
• Lighting is moving quickly into bio-genetics with new bulbs that can affect circadian rhythms, or promote plant growth or farm animal growth and integrate into newer smart devices like Nest.

And then there’s the real future; the Internet of Things (IoT). It was notable that one of the keynote speakers was a senior VP of Cisco. Cisco? At a Lighting show? Really?

Really… Cisco is heavily invested in the technology of IoT; including security and mass-adoption practices. There are currently 12B devices that connect to the internet; globally. By 2020 that number will be over 50B devices.

There are companies already developing data collection and management solutions through lighting that will feed into the Big Data movement. A ‘simple light bulb’ integrated with sensors and communication capabilities can do a lot more than light up your closet.

And one final note… the transition to LED seems to be working despite years of naysayers and skeptics. DOE reported that last year the US saved $1.8B in utility bills. And that number will grow significantly; spurring a rise in the investor-owned utility community to create new revenue streams via promoting solutions that in essence sells less of their product.

The pace of technology growth is the highest of any time in any currently living person’s life. It is exciting, confusing, bewildering and amazing. Enjoy the ride.

Researchers Make Strides with Novel Lighting Technology: Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells

The iridium metal center is wrapped in an organic coat which protects it in the LEC. The precise chemical structure of the coat allows the researchers to tune the color of the emitted light. ©University of Basel.

The iridium metal center is wrapped in an organic coat which protects it in the LEC. The precise chemical structure of the coat allows the researchers to tune the color of the emitted light. ©University of Basel.

Researchers at the Universities of Basel and Valencia recently reported that they have succeeded in laying the ground work for a novel solid-state light source based on light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs).

The group, led by Basel professors Catherine E. Housecroft and Edwin C. Constable, see LECs as potentially advantageous compared to LED because they are simpler devices with a single layer of active material, which can be solution-processed in ambient conditions.

Until now, LECs have had short life, which prevented exploration as a viable lighting technology. The research group have demonstrated that devices with lifetimes of 2,500 hours can now be prepared.

Click here to learn more.

Nobel Prize Winner Amano Says LED Lamps Will be Mainstream Lighting by 2016

amano2014 Nobel Prize in Physics winner Professor Amano Hiroshi, recently stated LED lamps will be a mainstream consumer light source by 2016, but challenges remain.

Primarily, he points out, costs must come down further, starting with production costs, which should come down five times by 2020. For this to occur, demand must increase globally and new technology such as 3D nanowire LEDs exploited.

Amano discusses these issues and new LED applications in this article at the BizLED website.

DSIRE Offers Updated Online Database of State Energy Efficiency Policies and Incentives

The North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center has relaunched the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE). Funded by the Department of Energy, DSIRE offers a comprehensive source of information related to policies and incentives that support the nation’s use of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies.

The new and improved website offers additional features:

* Find relevant policies and incentives by entering a ZIP code.
* Sort through nearly 2,800 active policies and incentives by applying various filters to search results.
* Access machine-readable, quantitative incentive data for all renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies.
* Build our open data into your websites and tools with our Application Program Interface (API).
* Build policy maps in real-time based on the current policy and incentive data in the database.
* Subscribe to specific policies and incentives to know when and how they have changed.

Click here to learn more about state energy efficiency policies and incentives in your area.

Product Monday: Square by Cooledge Lighting

Cooledge Lighting has expanded its “light sheet” portfolio with SQUARE, a 1×1 lighting product that requires no heat-sink and can be snapped together to create a larger luminous plane capable of being trimmed to size, even while powered. The light source can be affixed to almost any surface (and is flexible, allowing wrapping around columns and curved surfaces) and provides uniform illumination in a range of color temperatures.

Click here to learn more.

cool-edge