Category: Products + Technology

San Francisco Demonstrates Advanced Streetlight System

San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom and PG&E recently demonstrated streetlights installed on Turk Street (between Taylor and Jones) in the Tenderloin District, networked using Echelon’s LonWorks technology. The new LED…

San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom and PG&E recently demonstrated streetlights installed on Turk Street (between Taylor and Jones) in the Tenderloin District, networked using Echelon’s LonWorks technology. The new LED streetlights, remotely controlled and monitored, promise to reduce the city’s energy and maintenance costs while improving lighting quality and safety. Streetlights are among a city’s most expensive assets, accounting for almost 40% of its electricity costs, according to Echelon.

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The solution featured new LED streetlights from BetaLED embedded with Echelon’s power line signaling technology, allowing communication and control of the streetlights over the existing power lines. Echelon’s i.LON SmartServer is the segment controller, monitoring and controlling the streetlights from anywhere, at anytime over an IP connection. During the demonstration, Mayor Newsom used an iPhone to control and monitor the streetlights. Mayor Newsom also demonstrated a capability unique to LED lights and individual lamp control–the ability to “strobe” the lamps on and off. Tying such a capability to emergency services could add benefits such as enabling response teams to easily locate the site of an incident. A similar pilot project was completed in 2008 on Beale Street in San Francisco and was jointly developed by Echelon, PG&E and BetaLED.

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“Networked street lighting systems have been shown to reduce energy use by up to 40%, while improving citizen safety, dramatically lowering maintenance costs, and providing to-the-minute confirmation of lighting performance and availability,” said Anders Axelsson, Echelon’s senior VP of sales and marketing. “Like many energy and cost efficiency solutions, smart, networked streetlighting is not a question of invention, it is a matter of applying today’s technology and products in innovative ways to yield immediate and impressive results.”

San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom prepares to control streetlights equipped with Echelon control networking technology using an iPhone over the Web.

San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom prepares to control streetlights equipped with Echelon control networking technology using an iPhone over the Web.

“Municipalities and utilities are looking for immediate ways to reduce cost,” said Al Ruud, president of Beta Lighting. “BetaLED provides lower total cost of ownership than traditional sources by reducing energy and maintenance costs. When Echelon’s technology is added, energy and maintenance savings potentials are further enhanced, freeing up funds for other budgetary expenses.”

Click here to learn more about the control system. Click here to learn more about BetaLED’s streetlights.

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DisplaySearch: OLED Lighting Market to Take Off in 2011

The OLED lighting market is setting the stage to take off in 2011, with OLED lighting revenues forecasted to surpass PMOLED displays in the 2013-2014 time frame and reach $6…

The OLED lighting market is setting the stage to take off in 2011, with OLED lighting revenues forecasted to surpass PMOLED displays in the 2013-2014 time frame and reach $6 billion by 2018, according to DisplaySearch’s newly-released report, OLED Lighting in 2009 and Beyond: The Bright Future.

“The unique features of OLED lighting are inspiring the imagination of designers,” says Jennifer Colegrove, PhD, Director of Display Technologies at DisplaySearch. “OLED lighting devices emit from the surface, can be made flexible/rollable, and even transparent like a window or reflective like a mirror. OLED lighting is thin, rugged, lightweight, and has fast switch-on times, wide operating temperatures, no noise and is environmentally friendly. The power efficiency of OLED lighting has also improved dramatically in recent years.”

She adds: “Hundreds of millions of dollars have been invested in OLED lighting, especially in Europe, the US, and Japan. Although OLED displays have been in mass production for about a decade, OLED lighting just started sampling and small volume production. This is due to the fact that OLED displays and OLED lighting face different challenges.”

Market size is forecast through 2018 in the report, with breakdowns for six applications: automotive, display backlights, decorative/general lighting, healthcare/industrial, and signage/advertisement. Market forecasts are also given by substrate type, detailed by flexible versus rigid. Looking into the future, the OLED lighting industry will pick up in 2011, with Philips, GE, Konica Minolta, Lumiotec and OSRAM entering mass production, according to the company.

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DisplaySearch’s OLED Lighting report analyzes trends in the lighting industry and compares OLED lighting with five other lighting technologies: incandescent, fluorescent, high intensity discharge, LED and electroluminescent (EL). The report covers the OLED lighting supply chain, including more than 130 companies and universities, and analyzes several organizations related to OLED lighting in Europe, the US, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and China. The report also forecasts the efficiency, lifetime and average selling price of OLED lighting devices. The OLED lighting and OLED display markets are compared and market forecasts are analyzed.

To learn more about this report, click here and visit DisplaySearch or click here and try to obtain it from this other site.

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Philips Introduces MASTER LED Bulbs Using LUXEON LEDs

Philips has announced its MASTER LED collection of LED lamps that can be used in luminaires with E27 and GU10 sockets. The 7W E27 A55 lamp, identical in form factor…

Philips has announced its MASTER LED collection of LED lamps that can be used in luminaires with E27 and GU10 sockets.

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The 7W E27 A55 lamp, identical in form factor to a conventional light bulb, is most interesting, suitable for retrofit of 40W incandescents for nearly 83% energy savings in general lighting applications. The lamp is available in CW (4200K, 70 CRI, 230 lumens) and WW (3100K, 85 CRI, 155 lumens) color. The lamp is predicted to provide an average service life of 45,000 hours. No word (as far as I could tell) on compatibility with dimmers.

The complete product line appears to be targeted to general and downlighting luminaires in hotels and hospitality applications, but Philips is also promoting them to offices and homes as well.

Recently, the MASTER LED Bulb was honored by both the Institute Francais du Design and Equip’Hotel Paris for its innovative design and sustainability.

Currently, the product is only available in 230V countries, but should be available in the U.S. and Canada within the first half of 2009.

Click here to learn more about this interesting product.

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Load-shedding Ballasts Lighten the Load

I recently wrote an article for TED Magazine about load-shedding ballasts, available online here. A building’s demand for electric power is the sum of the power required to run its…

I recently wrote an article for TED Magazine about load-shedding ballasts, available online here.

Load-shedding ballasts were installed at the Spence School in New York City in a demonstration project funded by NYSERDA. The ballasts are linked to a building management system, allowing the school to reduce lighting energy consumption by 30 percent when desired. At the click of a button on a laptop or mobile phone, Spence School can temporarily reduce demand by 261 kW during emergency grid events. “The success of this project shows the huge potential of our new Demand Response Platform,” says Stephen Lynch, president of ACE Energy Company, Inc. “This technology will not only reduce Spence School’s energy cost but will also make the world a greener, more energy-smart place.” Photo courtesy of OSRAM SYLVANIA, Inc.

Load-shedding ballasts were installed at the Spence School in New York City in a demonstration project funded by NYSERDA. The ballasts are linked to a building management system, allowing the school to reduce lighting energy consumption by 30 percent when desired. At the click of a button on a laptop or mobile phone, Spence School can temporarily reduce demand by 261 kW during emergency grid events. “The success of this project shows the huge potential of our new Demand Response Platform,” says Stephen Lynch, president of ACE Energy Company, Inc. “This technology will not only reduce Spence School’s energy cost but will also make the world a greener, more energy-smart place.” Photo courtesy of OSRAM SYLVANIA, Inc.

A building’s demand for electric power is the sum of the power required to run its electrical equipment in operation at any given time. Demand rises and falls as equipment is turned on and off. Peak demand is the highest level of demand over a given period. It’s the most expensive power the utility must produce, and these high costs are passed along to customers. Demand charges can represent 25% of a commercial building’s electric energy costs.

To encourage its customers to reduce demand during peak demand periods, utilities, independent system operators (ISOs), and other power providers are offering demand-response programs that provide financial incentives to building owners who agree to curtail load on request—either at scheduled times or during an emergency.

Building owners can significantly reduce their electric utility costs, therefore, if they can curtail load on a schedule, in response to price signals, or on demand by a utility—a strategy called load shedding. When it comes to lighting, this means switching or dimming. To address this need, the major manufacturers have begun introducing load-shedding ballast products.

Load-shedding ballasts:

* Provide a way to reduce input power upon an external demand
* Can be instant-start or program-start
* Can be bi-level switching, bi-level dimming or continuous dimming

Dimming or switching/ Generally, dimming is preferable to switching in occupied spaces in which users perform stationary or critical tasks—i.e., where changes in light output should be unnoticeable to a high degree.

How low can light levels go before occupants object? In developing a prototype for load-shedding ballast technology subsequently commercialized by lamp and ballast maker OSRAM SYLVANIA, the Lighting Research Center studied the question and concluded that they could dim the lamps by as much as 40% for brief periods without upsetting 70% of the building’s occupants or hindering their productivity. LRC studies also showed that nine out of 10 occupants accepted the reduction when they were told that it was being done to reduce peak demand.

Solutions are generally classified as low voltage (respond to a control signal from low-voltage wiring) or line voltage (respond to a control signal from line-voltage wiring). Low-voltage solutions enable integration of the ballast with other control strategies such as daylighting control and scheduling. Line-voltage solutions are well suited for retrofit because no low-voltage wiring needs be installed, just a signal transmitter.

You can read the entire article here.

Here are a few additional notes not covered in the online article:

Low-voltage solutions, both analog and digital, include SYLVANIA’s QUICKTRONIC POWERSENSE ballasts (continuous dimming), GE’s UltraStart (continuous dimming) and UltraMax Load-Shedding Instant Start ballasts (bi-level or 0-10V dimming ballast, 1.18 to 0.71 ballast factor, a 40 percent reduction in both power and light output), Advance’s Mark 7 and ROVR ballasts (continuous dimming), and Universal’s SuperDim, DaliPro and AddressPro (continuous dimming) and Ballastar ballasts (step-switching and dimming).

Line-voltage solutions, ideal for retrofit, including Universal’s DemandFlex ballasts and Demand Control Lighting (DCL) control system (enabling individual circuit control so that the load on some circuits can be reduced further than on other circuits—or turned off), Advance’s Mark 10 ballasts (continuous dimming), GE’s UltraMax Bi-Level Switching or 0-10V Load Shed Instant Start ballasts (step-switching from 1.18 to 0.71 BF), and SYLVANIA’s PowerSHED ballast (step-dimming with a one-third reduction in power, operates with a control signal transmitter, located at the control panel, capable of serving hundreds of ballasts).

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Wonsik Chae’s “Lighting Bag”

One of my favorite bloggers, Jim Hutchison of Jim on Light (he’s chief design consultant for Alive Lighting, an entertainment lighting design firm), recently found this gem–“lighting bags” containing fluorescent…

One of my favorite bloggers, Jim Hutchison of Jim on Light (he’s chief design consultant for Alive Lighting, an entertainment lighting design firm), recently found this gem–“lighting bags” containing fluorescent materials, which react with chemicals in a cup.

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The result is illumination, seemingly from a “tea bag” (but unfortunately inedible), the product of South Korean industrial designer Wonsik Chae.

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Check it out here, including a cool short showing the process in action.

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Luminous Ceilings Present Illusions of Sky

Sky Factory Offers EcoSlim Luminous SkyCeilings, an edge-lit product that the company says provides authentic illusions of sky displayed in an ultra-thin, toxin-free system. The new version of the product…

Sky Factory Offers EcoSlim Luminous SkyCeilings, an edge-lit product that the company says provides authentic illusions of sky displayed in an ultra-thin, toxin-free system.

EcoSlim Luminous SkyCeilings by The Sky Factory

EcoSlim Luminous SkyCeilings by The Sky Factory

The new version of the product (EcoSlim) offers a low-profile design that eliminates ceiling clearance limitations, paving the way for renovation and retrofit installations. The image tile is only a quarter-inch below the uniformly illuminated edge-lit light guide. The product is dimmable.

The product is designed for healthcare, hospitality, commercial, institutional and residential applications, but typical applications would include hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, restaurants, spas, gymnasiums, retail stores, offices, conference rooms, classrooms, bedrooms and kitchens. It is compatible with MRI applications and sealed/gasketed versions are available for clean environments.

EcoSlim Luminous SkyCeilings by The Sky Factory

EcoSlim Luminous SkyCeilings by The Sky Factory

Why use SkyCeilings? Sky Factory says the product triggers “the same psycho-physiological relaxation response as an experience of real sky. It can even modify the viewer’s subjective experience of vertical space, making enclosed areas feel more open and less claustrophobic. Evidence Based Design research has shown that authentic illusions of nature such as Sky Factory SkyCeilings alleviate stress, increase comfort, and reduce the use of pain medications in healthcare environments. In the workplace, hospitality and residential environments, these ceilings have been shown to increase productivity and reduce fatigue.”

Click here to learn more about Sky Factory’s products.

Fail-Safe Lighting, by the way, offers what seems to be a competitive product called Visual Therapy. These fixtures also help create a healing environment by illuminating photographic images by Joey Fischer, nature photographer and Smithsonian Award recipient.

Visual Therapy by Fail-Safe Lighting

Visual Therapy by Fail-Safe Lighting

The series is available in standard, clean room or MRI-LED models and in a variety of mural configurations ranging from 2-ft. x 2-ft. to 4-ft. x 12-ft.

Click here to learn more about this product from Fail-Safe Lighting.

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Barcode by Hampstead Lighting

I decided to post a quick note and photo about this relatively new product from Hampstead Lighting, as it has an interesting aesthetic and caught my eye while browsing HomePortfolio.com….

I decided to post a quick note and photo about this relatively new product from Hampstead Lighting, as it has an interesting aesthetic and caught my eye while browsing HomePortfolio.com.

This contemporary luminaire is constructed of clear, frosted/etched or mirrored glass and stainless steel with a single 24-80W lamp. It can be pendant, ceiling or wall mounted. The dimensions are 60″ L x 1.8″ D x 4.8″ H x 60″ ext.

Check it out at HomePortfolio.com here.

Check it out at Hampstead here. Red, blue and white versions, barcoded and solid.

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Extended Life Linear Fluorescent Lamps

I recently wrote an article for TED Magazine about extended-life linear 4-ft. fluorescent T8 lamps. Industry averages: * 20,000 hours at 3 hours/start on instant-start ballast (the most commonly installed…

I recently wrote an article for TED Magazine about extended-life linear 4-ft. fluorescent T8 lamps.

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Industry averages:

* 20,000 hours at 3 hours/start on instant-start ballast (the most commonly installed electronic ballast)
* 24,000 hours at 12 hours/start on instant-start ballast
* 24,000 hours at 3 hours/start on a programmed-start ballast
* 30,000 hours at 12 hours/start on a programmed-start ballast

Extended-life lamps raised the bar on fluorescent lamp life, with new-generation lamps pushing it even higher.

Depending on the manufacturer and lamp, extended-life lamps can offer service life of:

* 24,000-36,000 hours at 3 hours/start start on an instant-start ballast
* 30,000-40,000 hours at 12 hours/start on an instant-start ballast
* 24,000-40,000 hours at 3 hours/start on a programmed-start ballast
* 36,000-46,000 hours at 12 hours/start on a programmed start ballast

Some of these lamps (“premium fluorescent lamps”) are premium versions of standard lamps, combining the benefit of longer life with other high-end performance features such as additional energy savings, low mercury, RoHS compliance, and, in some cases, an extended lamp warranty. The lamps at the high end of the range of rated life may be recognizable via a suffix at the end of the lamp’s nomenclature, such as XL, XLL (Philips Extra Long Life), and SXL (GE Super X-tra Life).

There are also a number of extended-life T5 lamps available as well.

The lamps are ideal for projects where lower maintenance demands and a higher degree of sustainability are desired.

The best white LED products offer about 50,000 hours under optimal field conditions. Fluorescent will not go down without a fight.

You can read the complete article here, courtesy of TED Magazine.

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Light as Architectural Material

Furniture designer SAAZS has collaborated with Saint-Gobain Innovations to produce Planilum technology, which enables light to be incorporated as a material into stylish objects and furniture. Planilum, a complex multi-layered…

Furniture designer SAAZS has collaborated with Saint-Gobain Innovations to produce Planilum technology, which enables light to be incorporated as a material into stylish objects and furniture.

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Planilum, a complex multi-layered special glass containing a plasma gas excited through transparent conductive layers, can light up a 40-sq.m. room for 100 input watts.

The result is incredible. The first exhibition of concept pieces utilizing this technology, called “Light Prose by SAAZS,” was held in Milan with experimental pieces by Christian Biecher, Adrien Gardère and Arik Levy.

Visit SAAZS here to learn more.

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New Lighting Products in 2009

Since the launch of the blog I’ve been having to weed out comments for some of the posts where manufacturers or manufacturer sales reps are trying to promote their new…

Since the launch of the blog I’ve been having to weed out comments for some of the posts where manufacturers or manufacturer sales reps are trying to promote their new products.

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I’m not against people doing this, not at all. It’s just that those posts were not the right place for promotional messages.

To provide a forum, I am producing this post hoping it attracts the interest of manufacturers and specifiers, users, installers, etc., where manufacturers can talk about what’s new at their companies.

I’m not editing these comments beyond the usual rules, so you’re likely to see all sorts of products. Needless to say, LightNOW makes no endorsement, accepts no liability, etc.

So: What’s new?

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