Category: Light + Health

Coronet Enters GUV Market with Upper-Room Disinfection Solution

Coronet’s GUV series provides direct visible white illumination for general lighting while emitting 275-nm UV-C in the indirect component for upper-room disinfection.

Coronet’s GUV series provides direct visible white illumination for general lighting while emitting 275-nm UV-C in the indirect component for upper-room disinfection.

Upper-air GUV is a method where a UV-C source disinfects aerosolized particles in air circulating in the upper part of a space, where convection and ventilation deliver it.

Coronet also has an Air Flow – GUV device that mounts in the space. Fans draw air through the device, where it is disinfected using internal, shielded UV-C lamps. Here’s what it looks like in a space:

It’s been interesting seeing lighting manufacturers adopt different approaches to adapt GUV into buildings. As with any other solution, be sure to get educated about UV-C, which can be harmful under direct exposure, when exploring options.

Click here to learn more about Coronet’s approach.

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LightingEurope Calls for Adoption of UV-C

LightingEurope is advocating the installation of UV-C disinfection technologies as part of the European Union’s Renovation Wave (part of the EU Green Deal) and the application and enforcement of existing safety rules and standards.

LightingEurope is advocating the installation of UV-C disinfection technologies as part of the European Union’s Renovation Wave (part of the EU Green Deal) and the application and enforcement of existing safety rules and standards.

“Our challenge is to switch regulator’s perception of UV-C beyond special applications to mass market solutions for buildings and transport, where the concentration of human activity raises the risk of contamination,” says Lionel Brunet, President of LightingEurope. “As LightingEurope, we have the responsibility to engage in UV-C as part of our actions to renovate lighting. Our aim is to educate authorities and the market on the industry guidelines and standards already in place and to promote the uptake of UV-C solutions.”

To support is advocacy, LightingEurope published a Position Paper on the benefits of using UV-C disinfection to combat COVID-19and is reaching out to European regulators.

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OSRAM Introduces UV-A Disinfection in Cars in Europe

OSRAM recently introduced the Air Zing Mini air purifier, a 7.5-centimeter round device that fits in air vents, to disinfect germs from the air inside vehicles to improve air quality for drivers and passengers. Using UV-A-emitting LEDs, the device can eliminate up to 99.9% of viruses and bacteria, according to the company.

OSRAM recently introduced the Air Zing Mini air purifier, a 7.5-centimeter round device that fits in air vents, to disinfect germs from the air inside vehicles to improve air quality for drivers and passengers. Using UV-A-emitting LEDs, the device can eliminate up to 99.9% of viruses and bacteria, according to the company.

The UV emission works at a wavelength of 360 to 370 nanometers (UV-A) and has already been successfully tested against bird flu viruses, according to OSRAM. The air purifier also eliminates airborne allergens, pollutants, and smells.

The device retrofits into the vehicle’s ventilation slats with a clip. The included USB cable supplies power to the air purifier via any standard USB socket. The device operates quietly and illuminates the brand logo on the top in a subtle blue to show that it is working. Air is drawn into the unit and passed through a titanium dioxide filter, where it is cleaned by an array of UV-A LEDs. A photocatalytic reaction kills viruses and bacteria cells before the purified air is expelled through the top of the housing. The filter can be cleaned with clear tap water, dried and reused. The UV radiation is encapsulated for safety. Additionally, the device can be used freestanding, making applications outside the car possible, including on office desks.

The air purifier will be available in Europe in October.

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ALA, NEMA, and UL Team Up to Offer UV Safety Guidance

The American Lighting Association (ALA) and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), and UL recently released a new position paper due to an increased demand for ultraviolet light as a sanitizing and germicidal agent during the COVID pandemic. The position paper brings attention to UV device safety risks and helps manufacturers, retailers, and consumers understand which devices are safe and under what conditions they can be operated safely.

The American Lighting Association (ALA) and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), and UL recently released a new position paper due to an increased demand for ultraviolet light as a sanitizing and germicidal agent during the COVID pandemic. The position paper brings attention to UV device safety risks and helps manufacturers, retailers, and consumers understand which devices are safe and under what conditions they can be operated safely.

The paper, Ultraviolet-C (UVC) Germicidal Devices: What Consumers Need To Know, provides a deeper look at the UVC germicidal devices available to consumers and their potential to cause severe injuries to humans and pets, as well as damage to plants and materials.

Click here to get it.

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Cree’s Jeff Hungarter on Tunable White

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Jeff Hungarter, Commercial Indoor Director, Cree Lighting, on the topic of tunable-white lighting, focusing on its potential intersection with circadian health. The interview informed an article I wrote for the November 2020 issue of tED Magazine, the official publication of the NAED.

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Jeff Hungarter, Commercial Indoor Director, Cree Lighting, on the topic of tunable-white lighting, focusing on its potential intersection with circadian health. The interview informed an article I wrote for the November 2020 issue of tED Magazine, the official publication of the NAED.

DiLouie: How would you characterize demand for tunable-white lighting?

Hungarter: The demand tunable white is just starting to climb the curve for being specified and driven into lighting projects. There is lots of interest and education going on, but we still see many times it’s the first item “Value Engineered” out when budgets get tight. Across many verticals, they like the idea, but don’t want to pay for it.

DiLouie: How would you characterize demand for circadian-friendly lighting designs? Has the COVID pandemic spurred more interest in wellness and lighting’s role in it?

Hungarter: Lots of interests and questions about circadian lighting design, but I would not say we have seen a spike in demand for these types of products. COVID has spun more interest in disinfectant lighting than Circadian or tunable white lighting by far. The market is struggling to keep customers, patients, and students safe, so naturally they are gravitating to the “assumed” benefits of what disinfectant lighting can provide, but we should use caution in understanding the tradeoffs of these varying solutions.

DiLouie: What role does color spectrum specifically play in circadian regulation?

Hungarter: Color spectrum plays a big role in Circadian regulation, but not the only one. Entrainment also requires a balanced combination of the correct luminous intensity, distribution, and duration of light, among other variables, to have a meaningful impact.

DiLouie: What is the full functionality that tunable-white luminaires offer to support circadian lighting designs?

Hungarter: As mentioned above, tunable white systems need to be able to support not just changing color spectrum, but also have the ability to dynamically change in intensity and duration during the day. We must also take into account the amount of light that is getting to the eye which is critical, so light distribution of the fixture also plays a role.

DiLouie: Otherwise, what role can tunable-white lighting play in promoting occupant mood, satisfaction, and well-being?

Hungarter: Well, if implemented correctly, tunable white solutions can enhance people’s moods by giving them a touchstone to the outside world, especially in places where they have no access to windows or sunlight. In combination with other design elements like ergonomic furniture and enhanced air quality can really influence the well-being of the people in the space.

DiLouie: A challenge of plugging tunable-white lighting into a circadian design is that circadian stimulation may be more closely related to spectral profile than CCT. Do you agree this is an issue, and if so, how is your company and the industry in general addressing it to adapt the technology to circadian lighting?

Hungarter: I think the industry is still learning a lot about circadian lighting design and how it affects people differently. In our Cadiant Dynamic Skylight, while we designed to mimic the spectral content of a natural day, the software behind it is flexible so as we learn more about what is needed for circadian lighting we can adapt our fixture to meet those needs.

DiLouie: Currently, there are two specifications for circadian lighting, one promoted by UL/LRC and the other by the WELL Building Standard. What are the metrics these use, and how do they primarily differ? What do they offer the industry?

Hungarter: There are lots of discussions in the lighting design world about the various measuring metrics. Both have the starting base that multiple photoreceptors in the eyes send signals which can trigger varying responses. While they may differ in “the how”, the research and development of these and other studies all help bring attention and education of how important light and other design elements can support health and well-being.

DiLouie: What is the impact tunable-white lighting can have on adherence to these requirements?

Hungarter: Tunable white lighting can play a large role to help meet the standards as we learn more about the benefits and educate ourselves to “do no harm”. We’ve heard many a lighting designer say, “I don’t want to prescribe light, I’m not a doctor”, so we must be careful here if we are attempting a true circadian design and bring in those who understand the science of health and well-being.

DiLouie: How does circadian lighting in general and tunable-white lighting installations in particular differ from typical lighting designs, and what can distributors do to support the process to ensure good outcomes?

Hungarter: In many typical lighting designs, you may be just replacing an existing fixture and have limited ability to change much of the design layout. With tunable white and circadian lighting designs, you would want to make sure the design is well thought out and factors like the range of color spectrum, amount of light able to get to the eye, and how the light distribution patterns and intensity change throughout the day are accounted for, to just name a few.

DiLouie: What can distributors do to position their firms to promote and sell tunable-white lighting? What should they do to sell or prepare to sell circadian lighting solutions?

Hungarter: Above all they should educate themselves on what solution they are providing. There are many lighting designs that simply want a tunable white system to give people a connection to the outside world. Offering circadian lighting solutions without proper education and research is dangerous and unethical.

DiLouie: If you could tell the entire electrical industry just one thing about tunable-white lighting’s role in circadian lighting, what would it be?

Hungarter: Don’t be fooled, tunable white lighting is not circadian lighting. Tunable white will/can play an integral role as we gain more research and learn about where circadian lighting is going, but research and education are going to be key as we drive health and well-being into current and future lighting designs.

DiLouie: Is there anything else you’d like to add about this topic?

Hungarter: Do your homework! While there are lots of benefits to tunable white light, there’s much to be done to understand circadian lighting and its effects on health and well-being.

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The Health Case Against Daylight Saving

Daylight saving in 2020 ends November 1 and will resume March 14, 2021. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recently issued a position statement calling for an end to daylight saving, citing health risks posed by the longstanding practice designed to reduce energy costs.

Daylight saving in 2020 ends November 1 and will resume March 14, 2021. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recently issued a position statement calling for an end to daylight saving, citing health risks posed by the longstanding practice designed to reduce energy costs.

Here’s the abstract:

The last several years have seen intense debate about the issue of transitioning between standard and daylight saving time. In the United States, the annual advance to daylight saving time in spring, and fall back to standard time in autumn, is required by law (although some exceptions are allowed under the statute). An abundance of accumulated evidence indicates that the acute transition from standard time to daylight saving time incurs significant public health and safety risks, including increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, mood disorders, and motor vehicle crashes. Although chronic effects of remaining in daylight saving time year-round have not been well studied, daylight saving time is less aligned with human circadian biology — which, due to the impacts of the delayed natural light/dark cycle on human activity, could result in circadian misalignment, which has been associated in some studies with increased cardiovascular disease risk, metabolic syndrome and other health risks. It is, therefore, the position of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine that these seasonal time changes should be abolished in favor of a fixed, national, year-round standard time.

Check out the complete statement here, published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

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IES and IWBI Announce Memorandum of Understanding

The Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) and the International Well Building Institute (IWBI) recently announced a memorandum of understanding enabling future collaboration to improve the quality of indoor environments through improved lighting design.

The Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) and the International Well Building Institute (IWBI) recently announced a memorandum of understanding enabling future collaboration to improve the quality of indoor environments through improved lighting design.

The lighting community has a heightened focus on non-energy related benefits of light. Americans spend most of their time indoors yet our buildings often fail to realize the role that quality lighting systems have on our visual, mental and biological health. Both organizations share a desire to transform our buildings and communities into spaces that enhance health and wellness.

The IES and IWBI have agreed to promote and support future joint programs, guidelines and metrics by means of input from technical experts, and development of appropriate IES standards and procedures. Potential research projects and increased participation in committee activities are anticipated.

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Archived IALD Webinar: Lighting Design and GUV Technology

In this webinar produced by the International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD), LESA Center Director Robert Karlicek joins Darcie Chinnis and David Pfund as they explore germicidal UV technologies and applications for the built environment.

In this webinar produced by the International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD), LESA Center Director Robert Karlicek joins Darcie Chinnis and David Pfund as they explore germicidal UV technologies and applications for the built environment.

Check out the archived webinar below. You can get the slide deck here.

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Sign of the Times: Our Yoga Place Chooses Visible Light Disinfection

Hubbell Lighting recently published an interesting case study for its SpectraClean solution, general lighting that emits a portion of its spectrum in the narrow-band 405 nm for microbial disinfection.

Hubbell Lighting recently published an interesting case study for its SpectraClean solution, general lighting that emits a portion of its spectrum in the narrow-band 405 nm for microbial disinfection.

The owners of Our Yoga Place set out to make their 4,300-sq.ft. studio a clean and healthy space. They eventually chose Hubbell’s SpectraClean luminaires. The luminaires can operate in three modes: white light, white/disinfection blend, or all disinfection. The germicidal effects of narrowband visible light work to suppress a wide range of bacteria, molds, fungi, and yeast (it is not proven effective against viruses).

Due to the COVID pandemic, we are currently seeing a trend develop around lighting used for disinfection purposes.

Click here to check out the project.

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Lighting Research Center Releases Results of Online UV Disinfection Survey

The Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is currently examining a range of UV disinfection technologies. To launch the project, the LRC administered an online survey asking about people’s experiences with and concerns about UV disinfection products.

The Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is currently examining a range of UV disinfection technologies. The goal of this work is to provide information that will help decision makers select UV products that are effective, safe, and energy efficient. A unique feature of this effort is the testing and evaluation of several UV disinfection products. This project is supported by members of the LRC’s Lighting Energy Alliance and the McClung Lighting Research Foundation.

To launch the project, the LRC administered an online survey asking about people’s experiences with and concerns about UV disinfection products. Responses to the survey were received from over 200 people in June and July 2020. The largest percentage of respondents were lighting specifiers (38%) followed by lighting manufacturers (28%). Also responding were energy service personnel (11%) and lighting manufacturers’ representatives and distributors (9%). A few responses came from educators (8%), architects (3%), HVAC professionals (2%), and architectural engineers (1%).

Primary job functions of UV survey respondents

In the survey, respondents were asked to select what they believed to be the three most promising types of UV disinfection products (Figure 2). The most popular choices were: upper-room air purification (58%), in-duct air purification (55%), surface disinfection integrated with light fixtures (45%), and surface disinfection from (dedicated) wall- or ceiling-mounted products (40%).

Survey respondents’ opinions about most promising UV disinfection products

Survey respondents were also asked to select what they viewed as the three most promising application types for UV disinfection (Figure 3). Most respondents (83%) selected healthcare applications. Half (50%) thought that transportation and long-term care (i.e., nursing home) facilities were a promising application for UV disinfection systems. Less than a third of respondents selected schools and colleges (33%), restaurant food service (31%), and office buildings (26%) among their top three rated application types.

Survey respondents’ opinions about most promising application types for UV disinfection

Finally, respondents were asked to select the three greatest concerns they had with UV disinfection technologies (Figure 4). Most respondents (81%) were concerned about product safety. Also of concern were field verification of effectiveness (62%) and overall effectiveness of UV products (53%). A third of respondents were concerned about damage to materials (33%) and the lack of clear building safety codes for use of UV disinfection in buildings (31%). Of lesser concern were ongoing maintenance (17%), high product cost (14%), and energy use (9%).

Survey respondents’ opinions about most promising application types for UV disinfection

The LRC will use the results of this survey to guide the testing and evaluations, and to provide decision makers with technical information for selecting UV disinfection products and application types.

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