Category: Education + Resources

EarthTalk Book Offers Answers to Everyday Questions About the Environment

E ~ The Environmental Magazine, publisher of the nationally-syndicated EarthTalk column, which runs in America’s newspapers, magazines and websites, has compiled the “best of” its popular column all in one…

E ~ The Environmental Magazine, publisher of the nationally-syndicated EarthTalk column, which runs in America’s newspapers, magazines and websites, has compiled the “best of” its popular column all in one place: EarthTalk: Expert Answers to Everyday Questions About the Environment (A Plume original / ISBN 978-0-452-29012-9 / $15.00).

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EarthTalk consists of real questions from real readers of the column and of E ~ The Environmental Magazine, in a format that is quick and easy and aimed at the average Joe (or Jane). For example, topics in the book include:

• Recycling: Does it really cost more energy than it saves? What’s the deal with the number system printed on the bottom of plastic bottles? Where can you recycle cell phones, tennis shoes, printer cartridges?

• Buying local and organic: What are the benefits of “buying locally?” Do urban gardens significantly contribute to our food supply? How can you tell if food is really organic?

• Green living and working: How can you reduce the unwanted mail you receive? What home improvements can make your home greener? What’s more green-friendly: using a dishwasher or washing by hand?

• Eco-friendly autos: Are hybrid car batteries recyclable? How can you convert a car to run on cooking oil? Are there green-friendly taxi cabs?

Based on the nationally syndicated column that reaches up to 80 million people, this comprehensive guide is a valuable tool for easy research about key environmental issues.

To get a copy, visit your local bookstore or click here.

EARTHTALK™
Expert Answers to Everyday Questions About the Environment
E ~ The Environmental Magazine
A Plume Original / Available March 2009 / ISBN: 978-0-452-29012-9 / $15.00

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Light + Design: A Guide to Designing Quality Lighting for People and Buildings

Over the past two years, I had the pleasure of working with an extraordinary group of lighting professionals–Carol Jones, Naomi Miller, Leslie North, Peter Ngai, Dawn DeGrazio, Veda Clark and…

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Over the past two years, I had the pleasure of working with an extraordinary group of lighting professionals–Carol Jones, Naomi Miller, Leslie North, Peter Ngai, Dawn DeGrazio, Veda Clark and Yukiko Yoshida–on the development of Light + Design: A Guide to Designing Quality Lighting for People and Buildings. This 192-page document is a practical guide to all areas of lighting design, aiming to introduce a wide range of architecture and design professionals to the principles of quality lighting design. I served as the Guide’s editor.

Click here for more information and to order.

2009 – 192 Pages
8 1/2 x 11 Hardcover
ISBN: 978-0-87995-231-0

Product ID: DG-18-08
Price: $95.00
Member Price: $66.50

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CLTC Study Demonstrates Major Energy Savings for Bilevel Occupancy Sensors

Earlier this month, I posted a new whitepaper at the Lighting Control Association website that talks about the findings of a new study about combining occupancy sensing and bilevel switching….

Earlier this month, I posted a new whitepaper at the Lighting Control Association website that talks about the findings of a new study about combining occupancy sensing and bilevel switching.

According to the Advanced Lighting Guidelines, occupancy sensors in private offices can produce up to 45% energy savings.

A 2002 study by ADM Associates found that bilevel switching (multilevel switching with 3-lamp luminaires, the inboard lamp switched separately from the outboard lamps) produces 22% energy savings in private offices.

At least one-half of the energy codes in the United States are based on the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), which requires automatic shutoff of lighting when it’s not being used, such as via an occupancy sensor, while also requiring light level reduction controls such as multilevel switching or dimming in enclosed spaces such as private offices. But IECC says that if an occupancy sensor is used in an enclosed space such as a private office, light level reduction controls are not needed, suggesting an either/or choice.

What if bilevel switching was combined with occupancy sensor functionality? Would this produce higher energy savings in a private office than bilevel switching or occupancy sensing alone. And: What combination of manual initiative and automation would produce the highest energy savings while also satisfying workers?

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The California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) organized a study in eight private offices at the University of California and found that combining the functionality of occupancy sensing and bilevel switching in a single device (controlling two relays for two zones of lighting) saved more energy than if an auto-ON occupancy sensor was used alone. In fact, using a manual-ON occupancy sensor saved 46% more energy than an occupancy sensor alone, and an auto-ON-to-50%-light-level sensor saved even more–52%.

This kind of research shows how controls can be used to maximize energy savings in private offices without sacrificing lighting quality. It’s likely to influence future energy codes.

Click here to read the article and learn more about the study results.

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Visit Lightsearch.com at Lightfair International

Visit Lightsearch.com at Lightfair at Booth #2984! Since 1995, Lightsearch has been the lighting community’s premier lighting search tool, providing essential information and links to more than 8,000 lighting companies….

Visit Lightsearch.com at Lightfair at Booth #2984!

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Since 1995, Lightsearch has been the lighting community’s premier lighting search tool, providing essential information and links to more than 8,000 lighting companies.

Lightsearch.com will be exhibiting at Lightfair International at Booth #2984 in New York in early May. Be sure to visit and say hello to Gary Turpen, the site’s owner. He’s a great guy and will be happy to give you a tour of what’s new at the site.

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New DOE Commercial Lighting Solutions Web Tool Lights the Way Beyond 90.1

I wrote the below column for the April issue of Illuminate, published by Architectural Products Magazine, about the Commercial Lighting Solutions program produced by DOE to support organizations seeking to…

I wrote the below column for the April issue of Illuminate, published by Architectural Products Magazine, about the Commercial Lighting Solutions program produced by DOE to support organizations seeking to generate energy savings beyond ASHRAE 90.1-2004 without sacrificing lighting quality. I was also honored to take part in a charrette in Washington, DC to contribute to the lighting controls component of the software. Its a highly useful piece of software, and worth a drive.

The sustainable design movement encourages energy code compliance, daylighting, individual user control, responsible outdoor lighting and control system commissioning. But it also promotes exceeding energy codes that are already strict, resulting in lighting choices that may be guided more by the energy consumption of buildings than the visual needs of their occupants.

Indeed, the very notion of exceeding an energy code appears to contain inherent risks, even though the LEED green building rating system and even a Presidential executive order mandating upgrades for Federal buildings are all based on this approach. If energy codes are developed based on available technology and IES recommendations for light levels, why push beyond to save energy when doing so might compromise user satisfaction and productivity?

The traditional answer is that it is possible to have good design and very high efficiency largely due to technology that has already leaped ahead when a new code is announced, as these programs simply seek to stimulate demand for existing cutting-edge solutions. This argument is reaching a point of diminishing returns, however, as codes are becoming so restrictive they are beginning to consume cutting-edge technology themselves. To continue going beyond, we’re going to have to rethink codes in terms of energy consumed instead of power installed, wholeheartedly embrace advanced controls, and focus on design instead of just technology.

But does the specification community have the expertise to achieve these goals outside those projects produced by the top designers in the field?

“Achieving high levels of lighting energy efficiency appropriately involves thoughtful design,” says Carol Jones, lighting program manager for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. “Simple approaches, such as replacing T12 with T8 lamps, can achieve meaningful savings, but many building owners and tenants have already taken these steps. To get to the next level of performance, more comprehensive and integrated approaches are needed. But we have a capability challenge. Not enough people know how to do good lighting on a very low energy budget.”

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has taken a different approach with its Commercial Lighting Solutions (CLS) program, a component of Commercial Building Energy Alliances, private-public forums seeking to reduce energy consumption by significant levels in new and existing buildings in their vertical building markets. CLS seeks to stimulate adoption of advanced lighting technologies and design practices by making them available to the broader lighting specification community, not just the leaders in the field.

The result is an extraordinary interactive web tool that enables any lighting decision-maker to save 30% more energy than the ASHRAE 90.1-2004 standard energy code without sacrificing lighting quality that users need from lighting systems. (It’s important to note that CLS is based on saving kWh through design, not kW solely through equipment choices.) Intended users include designers, owners, contractors, distributors and others interested in the latest sustainable, energy-efficient solutions.

DOE has started with the retail market, identifying a range of space types and then engaging expert lighting designers to work with building owners, architects and manufacturers to produce design templates for typical spaces that can be used in new construction and relighting projects. Called “vignettes,” these templates include lighting layouts, controls recommendations, projected demand and energy savings, component specifications and supporting documentation.

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This is only the beginning. In the future, the tool will project energy cost savings and link designers to participating utilities, where applicable, to access rebates and other financial incentives for their design. CLS will also expand to include more templates in retail and later reach out to other building categories such as office and institutional buildings.

“CLS is not an ‘intelligent lighting designer’ and is not meant to replace the design process, but instead help lighting specifiers leapfrog the learning curve by providing a spectrum of possibilities for energy-efficient design,” says Jones. “CLS offers these design options based on best practice design principles for those wishing to exceed code without sacrificing quality for efficiency.”

Note that some lighting expertise is needed to understand and implement the design recommendations, and higher expertise will be needed if your project is atypical or has special lighting needs, as CLS was designed to target typical conditions in mainstream construction.

In beta testing over the past few months, CLS version 1.0 for retail buildings is free to the public and is officially launching at Lightfair International in early May. Get it free here.

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Environmental Activist Ed Begley and Artist James Turrell to Keynote Lightfair Institute

The keynote speakers at this year’s Lightfair Institute are: Live Simply So That Others Can Simply Live Ed Begley Jr. Sunday, May 3, 2009 12:00 pm – 1:45 pm “Our…

The keynote speakers at this year’s Lightfair Institute are:

Live Simply So That Others Can Simply Live

begleyEd Begley Jr.
Sunday, May 3, 2009
12:00 pm – 1:45 pm

“Our planet is an asset with value – let’s not treat it like a ‘going-out-of-business sale’!”

This empowering and humorous message on sustainable living includes how environmentalist and actor Ed Begley Jr. began his 37-year eco-journey in 1970, including stories about his first electric car and his first attempt at composting. Hear Ed’s take on global climate change, pollution, dependency on Mid-East oil – and how he believes that these are “challenges” that can be overcome.

Plato’s Cave and the Light Inside

turrellJames Turrell
Monday, May 4, 2009
12:00 pm – 1:45 pm

“My work is about space and the light that inhabits it. It is about how you can confront that space and plumb it. It is about your seeing, like the wordless thought that comes from looking into a fire.”

James Turrell, an artist working with light and space and best known for his work in progress, Roden Crater, will present an overview of his work and his sources of inspiration. His work can be found in collections worldwide. For more than four decades, he has created striking works that play with perception and the effect of light within a created space. Over the past two decades, his work has been recognized in exhibitions in major museums around the world, including the Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art in New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Panza di Biumo Collection, Varese, Italy.

Sponsored by Cooper Lighting, also presenting their SOURCE Awards.

Click here to register for Lightfair, including the Lightfair Institute and keynote presentations.

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2009 Advanced Lighting Guidelines to Preview at Lightfair

The New Buildings Institute has announced that they will be previewing the latest version of the Advanced Lighting Guidelines at Lightfair International May 5-7 in New York City. To see…

The New Buildings Institute has announced that they will be previewing the latest version of the Advanced Lighting Guidelines at Lightfair International May 5-7 in New York City. To see the 2003 ALG, click here.

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The new edition will be published online and features contributions from many of the country’s top experts in lighting design. I was honored to be invited by NBI to join such great company and make contributions to the controls section, which was edited by Jim Benya, as well as provide style editing for other chapters.

New content includes technical advances, enhanced application guides and integration with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Commercial Lighting Solutions.

Come see the preview at Booth 3088!

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New Report Forecasts High Growth in Global Energy-Efficient Lighting Market

Reportlinker.com is offering a new market research report that analyzes the global energy-efficient lighting market and forecasts to 2015. The report attempts to define the energy-efficient lighting industry and associated…

Reportlinker.com is offering a new market research report that analyzes the global energy-efficient lighting market and forecasts to 2015.

The report attempts to define the energy-efficient lighting industry and associated regulatory framework across the globe, provides info related to current and emerging technologies with comparative cost analysis, assesses market size and forecasts growth, and provides profiles of major lighting companies.

The report costs $3500.

Table of contents and ordering information here.

And if you’re interested in this type of research, be sure to check out a similar report I wrote for Pira Intertech some time ago, available here.

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Lighting Education Institute to Present Online Lighting Calculations Course

Craig A. Bernecker, founder and director of the Lighting Education Institute, will present a six-week online “immersion” course on Lighting Calculations from June 1 through July 6, 2009. Designed for…

Craig A. Bernecker

Craig A. Bernecker

Craig A. Bernecker, founder and director of the Lighting Education Institute, will present a six-week online “immersion” course on Lighting Calculations from June 1 through July 6, 2009.

Designed for architects, engineers, interior designers, lighting designers, sales reps, manufacturers and related professionals, the six weekly 90-minute webinars will cover the Lumen Method (Zonal Cavity) and Point Calculations for interiors, with structured examples and hands-on exercises of each.

The cost is $575.

Click here for more information or call 610.524.7969. Click here to send them an email.

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John Wiley Publishes New Residential Lighting Book by Randall Whitehead

John Wiley & Sons has announced the publication of Residential Lighting: A Practical Guide to Beautiful and Sustainable Design, 2nd Edition by Randall Whitehead. John Wiley & Sons says: “Written…

John Wiley & Sons has announced the publication of Residential Lighting: A Practical Guide to Beautiful and Sustainable Design, 2nd Edition by Randall Whitehead.

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John Wiley & Sons says: “Written by internationally recognized lighting consultant Randall Whitehead, this popular easy-to-read lighting design guide offers a highly visual introduction to the fundamentals for illuminating the single-family home. Emphasizing the use of ‘light layering’ he advocates using a combination of lighting sources to create a cohesive and versatile lighting system. The book offers advice on design tools and room-by-room lighting strategies. This Second Edition includes a new chapter on how to implement the use of energy efficient lighting design, including updated information on LED lamps, CFL’s and daylightng. Also included are 32 pages of color plates demonstrating professional remodels of interior and exterior rooms; including contributions from interior designers, architects, landscape designers in collaboration with well integrated lighting design.”

Table of Contents:

SECTION ONE: UNDERSTANDING LIGHT.

Chapter 1: The Functions of Illumination
Chapter 2: The Color of Light
Chapter 3: Choosing the Correct Lamps
Chapter 4: Choosing the Correct Luminaires
Chapter 5: Daylighting-Integration of Natural Light for Greener Design Practices
Chapter 6: Controls
Chapter 7: Special Effects

SECTION TWO: USING LIGHT

Chapter 8: Kitchens: the New Gathering Place
Chapter 9: Entrances: Setting the Tone
Chapter 10: Living Rooms: Layering Comfort with Drama
Chapter 11: Dining Rooms: The Main Event
Chapter 12: Bedrooms: Private Sanctuaries
Chapter 13: Bathrooms: Functional Luxury
Chapter 14: Home Offices: Work Spaces that Really Work
Chapter 15: Exterior Lighting: Expanding Interior Spaces Visually
Chapter 16: Applying Lighting Techniques

Residential Lighting: A Practical Guide to Beautiful and Sustainable Design, 2nd Edition
Randall Whitehead
ISBN: 978-0-470-28483-4
Hardcover
272 pages
December 2008
US $75.00

Click here to order.

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