Month: March 2017

IESNYC Selects Two Winners for Second Annual Scholarship

The New York City Section of the Illuminating Engineering Society has selected two winners – Marta Casarin, who will earn her MFA in Lighting Design at Parsons New School of…

The New York City Section of the Illuminating Engineering Society has selected two winners – Marta Casarin, who will earn her MFA in Lighting Design at Parsons New School of Design, and Evan Wilson, who will receive an MSc in Lighting from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) – for the second annual IESNYC Scholarship.

This merit-based scholarship, which is open to first-year students currently enrolled in a full-time graduate program as a degree candidate in the field of architectural lighting at an accredited college/university in New York State.

The scholarship has a monetary value of $25,000, which will be evenly distributed between the two recipients.

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Intertek Launches New Horticultural Lighting Certification Program

Intertek’s new Horticultural Lighting Certification Program addresses the unique requirements for horticultural luminaires, offering manufacturers an efficient path to launch products into this growing market. Due to the unique environments…

Intertek’s new Horticultural Lighting Certification Program addresses the unique requirements for horticultural luminaires, offering manufacturers an efficient path to launch products into this growing market.

Due to the unique environments where these products are installed, they are subject to environmental testing above and beyond general use lighting. In North America there are no safety and performance standards specific to horticultural lighting. As a result, Intertek has created a unique certification program to help manufacturers comply with current standards as well as plan for standards still in development.

Click here to learn more.

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Jim Brodrick on LED Streetlighting

Republication of Postings from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Program by Jim Brodrick, SSL Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy Last year, DOE devoted two Postings (in…

Republication of Postings from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Program by Jim Brodrick, SSL Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy

Last year, DOE devoted two Postings (in June and October) and a webinar to the topic of LED street lighting and its potential effects on human health and the environment, in order to lay out reliable information in the wake of news stories generated by the American Medical Association’s (AMA) community guidance on street lighting. The news stories have continued, and it’s clear that as discussion of these issues has become more widespread, so have many misperceptions and mischaracterizations of the technical information, with the difference between what has and hasn’t been scientifically established often blurred well beyond the squinting point.

So to redress the balance, DOE has assembled a list of helpful resources, including Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) that look at the matter in considerable depth, providing accurate and useful information to the discussion and clarifying the state of scientific understanding as it presently exists.

A quick clarification is needed from the start. We hear much discussion about the health effects of “blue” light, but reference to that particular color is really being used as simple shorthand for a broad range of wavelengths that exert varying levels of influence on health. Because the relevant wavelengths for most effects actually extend beyond any generally accepted definition of “blue” on either end of its associated spectrum, we instead favor the term “short-wavelength” light. To put a finer point on it, wavelengths, rather than specific colors, are responsible for the biological (and other) effects that are the focus of current concerns.

Present in sunlight, short-wavelength light is a fundamental component of the natural environment. Ongoing medical research has demonstrated the ability of some of these wavelengths to stimulate biological responses, such as affecting circadian rhythm (the 24-hour biological clock). Because of the rise in the use of LEDs for outdoor lighting applications, and their relatively higher content of short wavelengths compared to the high-pressure sodium (HPS) products they typically replace, the concern is that a potential for greater exposure to those wavelengths at night may ultimately be detrimental to health.

However, all light at night can potentially contribute to the biological responses and related health concerns raised by the AMA. White light sources have a greater potential ability to stimulate those responses than non-white sources, but none of the factors or concerns are unique to LEDs. At any given wavelength and intensity, there’s no difference between light emitted by an LED and that emitted by another type of light source. All nominally white light sources used for street lighting (mercury vapor, metal halide, fluorescent, induction, LED) have spectral power distributions (SPDs) with a greater proportion in short wavelengths than does the non-white HPS lighting that’s been the dominant type for street and roadway lighting for the last several decades.

What’s more, short wavelengths are a fundamental component of the visible spectrum and have their benefits, ranging from aesthetics to safety. White light sources containing short wavelengths render colors outdoors at night more naturally for human vision, aid in identification of people and objects, and improve contrast between an object and its background. Short wavelengths are also acknowledged to provide enhanced peripheral vision at the low levels of illuminance typically associated with street lighting. And it stands to reason that improved visual performance can bring associated safety benefits, which are a significant tradeoff when eliminated and often get short shrift in the ongoing debate. All this is not to say, however, that there aren’t applications where the benefits of omitting the blue wavelengths outweigh any detriments from doing so. But unlike most conventional light sources, LEDs lend themselves especially well to engineering the spectral content to precisely match the need, whatever it may be.

Another complicating factor is that SPDs with very different component wavelengths can produce the same CCT, which makes CCT only a rough gauge of the actual spectral content of a given light source. This in turn also means that CCT is only an approximate gauge of the potential health and visibility influences of a light source. Although it roughly tracks with short-wavelength content (with higher CCT usually corresponding to a higher content of short wavelengths, and vice versa), the individual SPDs of different light sources vary enough that CCT is not a reliable indicator of the specific wavelength content. For example, there are some 4000 K LED light sources that are actually lower in short-wavelength content than some 2700 K LED sources (or, for that matter, than a 2800 K incandescent source — see the FAQs). Again, the issues under discussion are associated with specific wavelengths, not with colors.

Although some of the media coverage has given the impression that LED street lighting is the cause of the issues being raised, in fact it offers key solutions to those issues. That’s because, unlike conventional street lighting, LED systems can be adjusted to provide only the level of illumination needed at any given time, and when well-designed they also offer a high degree of control over the direction in which light is emitted, which makes it much easier to reduce glare, light trespass, and uplight. This improved control also means that an LED streetlight can often meet the illumination requirement with just half of the lumens of the conventional system it replaces. All of this offsets much of the effects from any increased short-wavelength content in the LEDs — and may even more than offset those effects. But mention of this is typically neglected in most news stories.

Lighting is an essential part of our civilization. While some of its effects are only beginning to be understood, it’s crucial that in choosing the best course of action, we be guided by science, not sound bites. That’s the purpose of the new FAQs. We think you’ll find them useful.

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LEDs Magazine Announces Sapphire Award Winners

LEDs Magazine hosted its third annual Sapphire Awards at the Strategies in Light conference in Anaheim, co-located with The LED Show and Lightspace California. This was my first pilgrimage to…

LEDs Magazine hosted its third annual Sapphire Awards at the Strategies in Light conference in Anaheim, co-located with The LED Show and Lightspace California. This was my first pilgrimage to Strategies in Light, and I found the conference fascinating and valuable, though at this stage of industry disruption, there remain more questions than answers.

A highlight of the conference was the Sapphire Awards, in which LEDs Magazine recognized innovative solid-state lighting products.

Check out the winners here.

Sculpt Accent luminaire from Axis Lighting, which won in the Indoor Ambient, Track, and Accent SSL Luminaire Design category.

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Product Monday: Fluxstream by Philips Lighting

Philips Lighting’s FluxStream family of LED linear luminaires primise high-quality, more uniform light versus fluorescents for a greater range of applications, notably commercial and light industrial. These simple striplights deliver…

Philips Lighting’s FluxStream family of LED linear luminaires primise high-quality, more uniform light versus fluorescents for a greater range of applications, notably commercial and light industrial.

These simple striplights deliver up to 133 lumens/W of general-diffuse illumination with multiple CCT 3000-5000K), 80 CRI, 120-277 or 347V, 2,000- up to 14,000-lumen packages, multiple lengths, multiple mounting methods, and standard 0-10V dimming.

Click here to learn more.

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DOE Evaluates TLED Lamps

Below is one of my contributions to the March issue of tED Magazine. Reprinted with permission. Retrofits of fluorescent luminaires using tubular LED (TLED) lamps is growing in popularity, as…

Below is one of my contributions to the March issue of tED Magazine. Reprinted with permission.

Retrofits of fluorescent luminaires using tubular LED (TLED) lamps is growing in popularity, as evidenced by a recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CALiPER report. The report reveals that TLEDs now comprise more than 10 percent of all listed products and 50 percent of all listed lamps in DOE’s Lighting Facts LED product database. More than 4,500 products.

There are several types of TLED lamps, including UL Type A, B and C in addition to hybrid approaches. Type A lamps are plug-and-play lamps that operate directly on a fluorescent ballast. Type B lamps feature an integral driver. Type C lamps feature an external driver.

TLED lamps offer the highest mean efficacy of any lamp type in the Lighting Facts database of LED products. Product performance varies, but about 90 percent of the listed TLED products have an efficacy topping 100 lumens/W, which is about the same as a bare fluorescent lamp. It’s also the minimum required to qualify for the DesignLights Consortium’s Qualified Products List, which many utilities use to qualify products for their LED rebate programs.

More than 100 products have an efficacy exceeding 150 lumen/W, including one operating at a very high 190 lumens/W. On average, TLED efficacy decreases by 3 lumens/W for every 1000K decrease in correlated color temperature. The average efficacy of a plug-and-play TLED is 113 lumens/W, TLED with an internal driver is 116 lumens/W, and TLED with an external driver is 115 lumens/W.

The Lighting Facts data reveals TLED lamps have higher efficacies than dedicated LED troffers. However, that is bare-lamp efficacy. LED troffers have greater efficacy than TLED lamps installed in fluorescent troffers. This is because of the effect of luminaire efficiency, or percentage of light exiting the luminaire. CALiPER data suggests luminaire efficiency for troffers with TLEDs installed is about 75-85 percent, which reduces efficacy for the installed solution.

The Lighting Facts data indicates TLEDs overall have somewhat higher efficacies, draw less power and emit fewer lumens than the fluorescent lamps they replace. The economic appeal is in the reduction in power that translates to cost savings. TLED lamps produce less light than their fluorescent counterparts do; the mean output of listed 4-ft. TLED lamps is about 2,100 lumens, less than a typical 4-ft. linear fluorescent lamp. However, the TLED’s directional light output improves luminaire efficiency. In some cases, this balances out to an equivalent luminaire light output; in others, a reduction in light levels must be acceptable.

Otherwise, color and power quality characteristics are fairly consistent across products, with color rendering index (CRI) in the low 80s; a choice of 3000K, 4000K or 5000K correlated color temperature; and power factor exceeding 0.90.

TLED lamps offer higher efficacy and potentially lower installed cost than LED retrofit kits and luminaires. However, when considering TLED lamps, tradeoffs such as luminaire efficiency, light levels, light level uniformity, aesthetics, ballast efficiency and remaining life (in the case of plug-and-play TLED lamps), and electrical/safety factors should be considered prior to commitment.

Download the report here.

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Philips Lighting Creates Partner Ecosystem for Indoor Positioning

Philips Lighting recently announced its Location Lab partner program, comprised of companies developing innovative applications for its highly accurate indoor positioning system. The Location Lab partner program enables collaboration with…

Philips Lighting recently announced its Location Lab partner program, comprised of companies developing innovative applications for its highly accurate indoor positioning system.

The Location Lab partner program enables collaboration with industry leaders and start-ups to explore novel uses of the Philips’ indoor positioning system that appeal to innovation leaders in retail, malls, offices and other industries.

First partners to join include leaders in IT and system integration such as SAP1, Microsoft, and Capgemini, strategic enterprise technology advisors and market leaders in handheld computers and electronic shelf labels such as Zebra Technologies and SES-imagotag, location based service software providers such as Favendo, Adactive, Vipera, Nakko and Mapiq, and parties active in robotics such as Blue Jay.

The announcement of the Location Lab partner program builds on Philips Lighting’s previously announced partnership with product mapping and search provider Aisle411 and the YellowDot program to open the technology to other lighting OEMs. Partners in the Location Lab program get access to Philips’ indoor positioning software development kit and an evaluation kit comprised of indoor positioning LED lights. This allows them to easily gain familiarity with the indoor positioning technology and explore innovative use cases.

Philips Lighting utilizes a combination of its Visible Light Communication technology, Bluetooth, and the smartphone’s inertial sensors to deliver an indoor positioning system that offers 30 cm accuracy plus orientation, in-pocket notifications, and analytics. Visible Light Communication works by individual light points transmitting their location through modulation of light that can be detected by a smart phone camera but not by the human eye. The data stream is one-way and no personal data is collected by the lighting system.

This is a fascinating technology with a lot of potential. I’m looking forward to seeing where visible light communication will take us.

LEDs Magazine has more here.

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Lighting Research Center Expands Lighting Institute

The Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is offering the next LED Lighting Institute on April 25-27, 2017. This popular hands-on seminar covers the latest advances in solid-state lighting,…

The Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is offering the next LED Lighting Institute on April 25-27, 2017.

This popular hands-on seminar covers the latest advances in solid-state lighting, Internet of Things (IoT) and manufacturing. The program culminates with participants designing, building, and evaluating their own luminaires, now including custom 3D printed components.

Click here to learn more.

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Product Monday: AC-Powered LED Grazing Light by Acclaim

Acclaim Lighting’s AL Graze AC is a high-output, low-profile, AC-powered luminaire for outdoor and indoor linear grazing applications. IP66-rated for wet and dry locations, AL Graze AC contains an onboard…

Acclaim Lighting’s AL Graze AC is a high-output, low-profile, AC-powered luminaire for outdoor and indoor linear grazing applications.

IP66-rated for wet and dry locations, AL Graze AC contains an onboard AC+DMX driver with RDM addressing for internal control. The linear LED luminaire offers CCTs of 2700K, 3000K, 3500K or 4000K along with RGB, RGBW RGBA and Dynamic White (2400K-5500K). Beam angles can be set at 10º x 60º, 30º x 60º, 10º x 10º, 60º x 60º for maximum reach. Mounting 30º swivel mount and fixed flat mount are included with the unit for a wide range of applications.

Available in 1- and 4- foot sections with a linkable cable system for multiple configurations, AL Graze AC draws 9W per linear foot while operating at 100-277VAC. The AC-powered unit maintains 70% lumens at 150,000 hours and provides approximately 419 lumens/ft (4000K, 30º x 60º). This high-output luminaire operates at temperatures of -4°F to 123°F (-20°C to 50°C). Five-year warranty.

Click here to learn more.

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IES 2017 Conference Call for Speakers

Authors of papers related to the art, science and practice of illumination are invited to submit abstracts for papers and posters to be considered for presentation in either a paper…

Authors of papers related to the art, science and practice of illumination are invited to submit abstracts for papers and posters to be considered for presentation in either a paper or poster session at the 2017 IES Annual Conference, to be held in Portland, OR from August 10-12, 2017.

The procedure for accepting papers and posters related to both research and application will involve a review of extended abstracts, which are due May 1, 2017 (papers) and May 22, 2017 (posters). Acceptance decisions will be based on the potential technical quality, originality, impact and relevance to the conference audience.

Authors will be informed of the acceptance of papers and posters during the first week of June.

Click here to learn more.

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