Month: June 2013

Lighting Controls Association Publishes Whitepaper on Advanced Lighting Control Options for LEED v.4

The Lighting Controls Association recently published an article I wrote about advanced lighting control options that can be used to achieve Energy + Atmosphere points for LEED v.4. Version 4…

buildings3-300x179The Lighting Controls Association recently published an article I wrote about advanced lighting control options that can be used to achieve Energy + Atmosphere points for LEED v.4.

Version 4 of the popular Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) green building rating system is expected to be released at Greenbuild in November 2013.

Final balloting to approve the new LEED version is expected to occur in June, so we don’t know exactly what will be contained in the new rating system. One thing is almost certain, which is that the prerequisite for the Energy + Atmosphere section will change from the 2007 to the 2010 version of the ASHRAE/IES 90.1 energy standard, which is the national energy reference standard.

This standard is expected to be tough to beat in terms of both lighting power densities and controls. For controls, ASHRAE/IES 90.1-2010 requires automatic shutoff, bilevel lighting and daylight harvesting in a wide range of applications. These requirements are mandatory, meaning compliance translates to satisfying the LEED prerequisite.

What control options are available that can go beyond the prerequisite and earn LEED Energy + Atmosphere points?

The solution may be contained in the language of the standard.

Click here to read this article.

1 Comment on Lighting Controls Association Publishes Whitepaper on Advanced Lighting Control Options for LEED v.4

DOE Releases Feasibility Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting on the Golden Gate Bridge

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has published a technical feasibility assessment of replacing existing high-pressure sodium and low-pressure sodium roadway lighting on San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, conducted through…

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has published a technical feasibility assessment of replacing existing high-pressure sodium and low-pressure sodium roadway lighting on San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, conducted through the agency’s GATEWAY demonstration program. The goal was to identify solutions which would reduce maintenance and energy use without compromising the quantity or quality of existing illumination. However, the historic status and high efficacy of the existing luminaires—as well as their accepted color characteristics—present challenges for energy-saving alternatives.

Key findings include:

* Four luminaire types are currently used to illuminate the roadway, the two walkways, and the two towers. Although no suitable commercially-available LED retrofit kits were identified for installation within existing luminaire housings, it appears feasible to develop custom LED retrofit kits which would save energy while maintaining light levels. In doing so, issues surrounding color and color shift, thermal effects, vibration, and product weight may need to be addressed.
* Light emitted by existing luminaires is more yellow in appearance than light emitted by the alternative technologies, so mock-ups should be considered to determine whether a whiter light would be appropriate. Also, preliminary analysis suggests many of these alternative sources may appear somewhat greenish when installed in one luminaire type, an amber-lensed shoebox.
* Other options may ultimately merit evaluation, such as replacing existing luminaires with fully-integrated LED or ceramic metal halide (CMH) luminaires rather than replacing internal components. Several complete LED and CMH luminaires were found to offer energy savings, although the CMH products might increase maintenance due to the shorter rated lamp life. Alternately, the amber lenses might be reformulated to allow the use of off-the-shelf LED or CMH products.
* This analysis assumed that existing light levels must be preserved. If reduced illumination is determined to be acceptable, it could enable the use of lower wattage products, increase energy savings, and improve the feasibility of using LED technology in this application.

Click here to download the report.

1 Comment on DOE Releases Feasibility Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting on the Golden Gate Bridge

Jim Brodrick on Measuring and Perceiving the Color of Light

Republication of Postings from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Program by Jim Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy One of the panel discussions generating buzz at DOE’s tenth…

Republication of Postings from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Program

by Jim Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy

One of the panel discussions generating buzz at DOE’s tenth annual SSL R&D Workshop, held a few weeks ago in Long Beach, CA, was the one that focused on light spectrum and color perception. As you probably know, color issues are among the key obstacles to SSL adoption, which makes increasing our understanding of them critically important.

Characterizing the color of electric lighting is nothing new, but the emergence of SSL has created new controversies and raised new questions we’ve yet to resolve. One of the basic questions is how best to measure and describe the color of light and the way it renders colors. None of the existing or proposed metrics – including Color Rendering Index (CRI) and correlated color temperature (CCT) – is without limitations. And even supplementing them with additional metrics &ndash such as R9, which covers saturated red tones – doesn’t completely nail things down.

According to workshop panelist Jean Paul Freyssinier of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Lighting Research Center (LRC), no one metric can characterize color rendering with any degree of accuracy. The LRC advocates using CRI in combination with the gamut area index, which evaluates the relative area enclosed by sample colors on a chromaticity diagram when rendered by the source. Fellow panelist Cameron Miller of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) described an alternative metric, the Color Quality Scale, which was developed by NIST and addresses many of CRI’s limitations.

Miller’s main thrust, though, involved the potential advantages of discrete-spectrum light sources over continuous-spectrum sources. He explained that because of phosphor-conversion losses and the emission of light that’s not detectable by the human eye, broadband phosphor-converted white LEDs (pc-LEDs) are theoretically less energy-efficient than narrow-band LEDs, which have the potential to render colors equally well. Miller provided evidence that with three or four colors in discrete spectra that are properly tuned, high efficacy and excellent color rendering could both be achieved. But until all of the discrete emitters become efficient enough to make this practical, a hybrid approach that combines suitable pc-LEDs with discrete red emitters can serve as an interim solution.

Freyssinier questioned some of our most basic assumptions in rethinking how we define white light. The color-related standards for LEDs, fluorescent lamps, and many other types of light sources are based on the black-body curve (BBC), which he suggested is not the most suitable reference to use for white light. As an alternative, Freyssinier described a reference he and his colleagues at the LRC developed. Called the white-body curve, it’s slightly above the BBC at high color temperatures and below it at low color temperatures, and he cited studies showing that it corresponds to human perception of what is “white” light.

The color of light also affects us physiologically, which was the basis for the talk on spectrally enhanced lighting (SEL) given by panelist Brian Liebel of the Lighting Partnership. A design method for interior lighting applications, SEL is based on the principle that increasing the amount of short-wavelength energy (i.e., blue) within the light improves visual acuity by causing the pupils to narrow, which enhances one’s efficiency at performing detailed visual tasks. Liebel explained that this can save considerable energy by allowing for equivalent visual efficiency at lower light levels. Acknowledging the widespread industry belief that warm-white light is generally preferred over cool-white light, he cited studies suggesting that in a work environment – which is primarily where SEL is intended to be used – the majority of people have no real preference either way. A new technical memorandum on SEL, TM-24, is expected soon from the Illuminating Engineering Society.

Our understanding of the issues surrounding the color of light is far from complete, which may be limiting the adoption of energy-efficient SSL for some applications. Lively discussions like the one we had in Long Beach put a spotlight on the issues (pun intended), helping to pave the way for a broad-based understanding.

No Comments on Jim Brodrick on Measuring and Perceiving the Color of Light

Harvard Engineering and Venture Lighting Sign Distribution Agreement

Venture Lighting International, a manufacturer of metal halide lighting systems, recently announced that Harvard Engineering, a manufacturer of LED drivers and control products for the lighting industry, has signed a…

The Venture Lighting and Harvard Engineering teams celebrating their new agreement

The Venture Lighting and Harvard Engineering
teams celebrating their new agreement

Venture Lighting International, a manufacturer of metal halide lighting systems, recently announced that Harvard Engineering, a manufacturer of LED drivers and control products for the lighting industry, has signed a sole agreement with Venture.

The agreement, which is for the distribution and sale of Harvard’s LeafNut solution in the USA and Canada, cements a longstanding working relationship between the two companies. LeafNut is an advanced wireless control, management and reporting system for large deployments of outdoor lighting. The system uses a Central Management System (CMS) technology to remotely monitor and control each individual light.

No Comments on Harvard Engineering and Venture Lighting Sign Distribution Agreement

Product Monday: Theory by Focal Point

Focal Point’s Theory LED pendant, first introduced as a concept luminaire at LIGHTFAIR in 2008, is now a reality. Designed by Focal Point product designer Graeme Watt, Theory possesses a…

Focal Point’s Theory LED pendant, first introduced as a concept luminaire at LIGHTFAIR in 2008, is now a reality. Designed by Focal Point product designer Graeme Watt, Theory possesses a striking elliptical form that allows the LEDs to be integrated and concealed, illuminating both inside and outside surfaces. Low-voltage power is delivered via the aircraft cable suspensions.

focal-point-3

focal-point-1

focal-point-2

No Comments on Product Monday: Theory by Focal Point

BD+C Magazine Publishes Special LED Section

I recently produced a special section on LED lighting for the April issue of BUILDING DESIGN + CONSTRUCTION Magazine. Check it out in BD+C’s digital edition here (LF4-LF24, an insert…

bdcI recently produced a special section on LED lighting for the April issue of BUILDING DESIGN + CONSTRUCTION Magazine.

Check it out in BD+C’s digital edition here (LF4-LF24, an insert between PP. 42-43).

No Comments on BD+C Magazine Publishes Special LED Section

Lighting Controls Association Publishes Whitepaper on Importance of Commissioning

I recently authored an article for the Lighting Controls Association about a recent Energy Center of Wisconsin study demonstrating that proper commissioning of daylight harvesting lighting controls can lead to…

0.5-300x191I recently authored an article for the Lighting Controls Association about a recent Energy Center of Wisconsin study demonstrating that proper commissioning of daylight harvesting lighting controls can lead to higher energy savings. But an even bigger lesson, I believe, can be found in commissioning all automatic lighting control systems.

Read it here.

No Comments on Lighting Controls Association Publishes Whitepaper on Importance of Commissioning

Precision-Paragon [P2] Announces Results of 2012 Energy-Efficient Lighting Industry Survey

Precision-Paragon [P2] recently published the results of its Energy-Efficient Lighting Industry survey, distributed to more than 4,000 energy efficiency professionals. The survey results show that 77% of survey respondents expect…

Precision-Paragon [P2] recently published the results of its Energy-Efficient Lighting Industry survey, distributed to more than 4,000 energy efficiency professionals.

The survey results show that 77% of survey respondents expect their energy-efficient lighting revenue to grow in 2013.

The survey also suggests that automated lighting controls, such as occupancy sensors, are being specified in nearly half of all retrofits. Survey takers indicated that, on average, 48% of their energy-efficient lighting retrofits use automated lighting controls.

In terms of energy-efficient lighting technology, the survey predicts that fluorescent lighting will continue to be the predominant technology installed in 2013. 68% of survey takers expect that linear fluorescent will represent the primary lighting technology they install in 2013.

No Comments on Precision-Paragon [P2] Announces Results of 2012 Energy-Efficient Lighting Industry Survey

Product Monday: Lumalux Plus XL Ecologic Lamps by OSRAM SYLVANIA

OSRAM SYLVANIA’s LUMALUX PLUS XL ECOLOGIC high pressure sodium (HPS) lamp offers a rated life of 80,000 hours, over three times that of standard 24,000-hour HPS lamps. SYLVANIA LUMALUX PLUS…

OSRAM SYLVANIA’s LUMALUX PLUS XL ECOLOGIC high pressure sodium (HPS) lamp offers a rated life of 80,000 hours, over three times that of standard 24,000-hour HPS lamps. SYLVANIA LUMALUX PLUS XL lamps are the first to combine non-cycling and instant hot restrike features into one lamp and are made in the United States.

The non-cycling feature provides maintenance cost savings since the lamps remain off at end-of-life, eliminating repeat trips to the pole to replace outages. With the hot restrike feature, LUMALUX PLUS XL lamps instantly relight after a disruption of power, providing continued illumination which supports a safer outdoor environment. This high performing, longer life lamp is an economical alternative to current HPS lamps and LED technologies. Available in 100W and 150W, LUMALUX PLUS XL lamps are ideal for use in cobrahead, shoebox, wall pack, high and low bay fixtures in security, parking, tunnel, street and roadway lighting applications.

1 Comment on Product Monday: Lumalux Plus XL Ecologic Lamps by OSRAM SYLVANIA

Type on the field below and hit Enter/Return to search