Category: Codes + Standards

NEMA Publishes LE 6-2009 Procedure for Determining Target Efficacy Ratings for Commercial, Industrial and Residential Luminaires

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published LE 6-2009 Procedure for Determining Target Efficacy Ratings for Commercial, Industrial and Residential Luminaires. The document, produced by NEMA’s Luminaire Section, was…

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published LE 6-2009 Procedure for Determining Target Efficacy Ratings for Commercial, Industrial and Residential Luminaires. The document, produced by NEMA’s Luminaire Section, was last published in 2008.

LE 6 provides a procedure for the determination of the target efficacy rating (TER) for light fixtures under laboratory test conditions and describes categories or types of products used in common indoor and outdoor lighting applications. It does not apply to fixtures for specialized applications such as products intended to be aimed, accent luminaires, rough or hazardous use luminaires or emergency lighting. It is recommended to be used only as a guide to help in the selection of luminaires since TER does not address application characteristics such as color, uniformity, glare, or other important considerations.

The 2009 revision includes updates to the calculation of the energy effectiveness factor and clarifications to the luminaire types and classifications.

LE 6 may be downloaded free here.

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ASHRAE’s Green Building Standard Draws Nearer to Publication

The total building sustainability package, addressing everything from design and commissioning to plans for high-performance operation, is covered in a proposed green building standard currently open for public review. Proposed…

Green BusinessThe total building sustainability package, addressing everything from design and commissioning to plans for high-performance operation, is covered in a proposed green building standard currently open for public review.

Proposed Standard 189.1, Standard for the Design of High Performance, Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, is being developed by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) in conjunction with the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) and the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). The standard is slated to be the first code-intended commercial green building standard in the United States.

It is expected to be published in early 2010.

The proposed standard is currently open for a fourth public review. It is an independent substantive change review so only changes from the third public review, which ended in June 2009, are open for comment. The public comment period started September 18 and remains open until November 2, 2009.

Among the biggest proposed changes is in the exterior light pollution section, including elimination of the Total Site Lumen approach. The draft of the standard that went out for a third public review earlier this year required users to limit exterior lighting according to one of three methods for determining total initial lamp lumens, or light output, for all outdoor lighting. While site lumen limits are being explored in other model lighting pollution efforts, it complicates application and enforcement significantly, says Nick Ferzacca, vice chair of the committee and IES representative. The current draft maintains the use of Backlight, Uplight and Glare ratings from the IES Luminaire Classification System for Outdoor Luminaires (IESNA TM-15-07). Also, exterior lighting power densities and lighting zone definitions were modified to align with recent ASHRAE 90.1 addenda.

To view a copy of the public review draft, click here. Copies of public review drafts are only available during public review periods.

2 Comments on ASHRAE’s Green Building Standard Draws Nearer to Publication

IES Hartford Section to Host Model Lighting Ordinance Seminar on October 29, 2009

This month, the IES Hartford Section is presenting the Fall 2009 update and final draft of the Model Lighting Ordinance, sometimes called the “Dark Sky regulations.” The guest speaker is…

This month, the IES Hartford Section is presenting the Fall 2009 update and final draft of the Model Lighting Ordinance, sometimes called the “Dark Sky regulations.” The guest speaker is Leo Smith (Northeast Regional Director of the International Dark Sky Association), who served on the IDA/IESNA joint task force that developed the current MLO.

To register, click here.

October 29th IESNA Event Type Final

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NEMA Publishes Two Solid-State Lighting Standards

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published LSD 45-2009 Recommendations for Solid-State Lighting Sub-Assembly Interfaces for Luminaires. This new white paper, prepared by the NEMA Solid State Lighting Section,…

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published LSD 45-2009 Recommendations for Solid-State Lighting Sub-Assembly Interfaces for Luminaires.

This new white paper, prepared by the NEMA Solid State Lighting Section, covers the design and construction of interconnects for solid-state lighting applications. It compiles the latest industry information regarding mechanical, electrical, and thermal connections and documents existing industry best practices.

Download it free here.

NEMA has also published LSD 51-2009 Solid-State Lighting—Definitions for Functional and Decorative Applications.

This new white paper illustrates and clarifies the differences between functional and decorative SSL luminaires and provides guidelines for the specification of the major characteristics, performance criteria, and evaluation process needed for these products. It is designed to provide useful information to the public, and may also assist the government and other groups in SSL specification development.

LSD 51-2009 was prepared by the NEMA Next Generation Lighting Alliance (NGLIA), the NEMA Solid State Lighting Section, and the American Lighting Association.

Download it free here.

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ASHRAE/USGBC/IES Standard 189.1P Public Review Draft Available for Public Comment Through November 2, 2009

BSR/ASHRAE/USGBC/IES Standard 189.1P, Standard for the Design of High-Performance Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings is now in its fourth review draft and available for public review. This standard provides…

BSR/ASHRAE/USGBC/IES Standard 189.1P, Standard for the Design of High-Performance Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings is now in its fourth review draft and available for public review.

This standard provides minimum criteria that apply to new buildings and major renovation projects (new portions of buildings and their systems) and cover sustainable sites, water use efficiency, energy efficiency, the building’s impact on the atmosphere, materials and resources, and indoor environmental quality.

Download it here from the ASHRAE website. The current public review period expires November 2, 2009.

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NEMA Publishes LL 9-2009 Dimming of T8 Fluorescent Lighting Systems

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published LL 9-2009 Dimming of T8 Fluorescent Lighting Systems. This new standard is the first coordinated guidance from industry on the dimming of…

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published LL 9-2009 Dimming of T8 Fluorescent Lighting Systems.

This new standard is the first coordinated guidance from industry on the dimming of T8 fluorescent lighting systems; LL 9 covers ranges between 100% and approximately 35% output (60mA lamp current). The publication was a result of discussions between numerous manufacturers and end-users as well as years of data gathering, testing, and analysis.

LL 9 may be downloaded at no charge, or a hardcopy purchased for $36, by visiting
www.nema.org/stds/ll9.cfm, or by contacting IHS at 800-854-7179 (within the U.S.), 303-397-7956
(international), 303-397-2740 (fax), or global.ihs.com.

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2009 IECC Requires 50% of Lamps in Home to be High-Efficacy

Here’s an article I wrote for the July issue of Electrical Contractor Magazine on the topic of a new residential lighting provision in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC),…

home-buildingHere’s an article I wrote for the July issue of Electrical Contractor Magazine on the topic of a new residential lighting provision in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), used by most states as the basis of their residential energy codes, that requires 50% of lamps in newly built homes to be “high efficacy”–that is, fluorescent, at least at this point.

The approach has its critics. What do you think?

Check out the article here.

1 Comment on 2009 IECC Requires 50% of Lamps in Home to be High-Efficacy

ICC Plans Green Construction Code

The International Code Council recently announced that it has launched the International Green Construction Code (IGCC) initiative, which will reduce energy usage and the carbon footprint of commercial buildings. Entitled…

buildingsThe International Code Council recently announced that it has launched the International Green Construction Code (IGCC) initiative, which will reduce energy usage and the carbon footprint of commercial buildings. Entitled “IGCC: Safe and Sustainable by the Book,” the initiative is committed to develop a model code focused on new and existing commercial buildings. It will focus on building design and performance.

Just as there is now the IECC from ICC and 90.1 from ASHRAE for commercial energy codes, it seems we will have competing green construction codes as well (IGCC and ASHRAE’s Standard 189, in the works for some time now).

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New Energy Bill Would Require 30% Reduction Over Today’s Baseline Energy Codes

The passage by the U.S. House of Representatives of the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (ACES 2009) has been highly publicized for its Cap and Trade Program,…

The passage by the U.S. House of Representatives of the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (ACES 2009) has been highly publicized for its Cap and Trade Program, but there’s another provision that is of significant interest to the lighting community: the requirement that national building energy codes for residential and commercial buildings be created that would take precedence over state and local codes if equally or more stringent. The national code would have to achieve a 30% reduction in energy consumption compared to today’s codes. By January 1, 2014 (residential buildings) and January 1, 2015 (commercial buildings), a 50% reduction requirement would have to be reached. Then, by January 1, 2017 (residential) and January 1, 2018 (commercial), and after three years thereafter respectively through January 1, 2029 and January 1, 2030, a 5% additional energy reduction would have to be achieved per year.

capitolhill

Currently, there is no “national code” per se although the Department of Energy recognizes ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as the current national energy standard. In 2004, all states had to either put a commercial energy code in place as stringent as 90.1-1999 or justify why they could not comply. Recently, DOE recognized 90.1-2004 as the new national energy standard, with all states having to comply by 2011. Meanwhile, the Stimulus is pushing adoption and enforcement of 90.1-2007. It’s starting to get even more confusing than it usually is with so many different codes and versions. Meanwhile, if the bill passes, it will mark the first time that a national residential energy standard would be created.

Is this going to be achievable? The folks who bring you 90.1 are working towards a 30% energy reduction goal with the 2010 version of the Standard. They may or may not meet it, is what I hear (daylighting control and other elements will be part of the mix), and they haven’t even thought about the 50% goal. Like the 30% goal, the whole 50% won’t have to come from lighting, but it sounds like policymakers are being optimistic about what’s achievable, such as what LED lighting is going to be able to deliver.

Meanwhile, we keep making energy codes stricter and more complicated, limiting choice, to add to a building stock that is replaced at a rate of about 2% per year, meaning today’s most efficient building could be around for the next 50 years. They’re squeezing design out of design to save energy, while pretty much ignoring the thousands of buildings already constructed, many of them decades old, and most of them using lighting technology considered heavily obsolete by today’s standard.

3 Comments on New Energy Bill Would Require 303 Reduction Over Today’s Baseline Energy Codes

NEMA Publishes Two Roadway and Area Lighting Equipment Standards

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published two new roadway and area lighting equipment standards, ANSI C136.25-2009 Ingress Protection (Resistance to Dust, Solid Objects, and Moisture) for Luminaire Enclosures…

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published two new roadway and area lighting equipment standards, ANSI C136.25-2009 Ingress
Protection (Resistance to Dust, Solid Objects, and Moisture) for Luminaire Enclosures and ANSI C136.35-2009 Luminaire Electrical Ancillary Devices (LEAD).

street-lighting

ANSI C136.25-2009 provides guidance for protecting luminaires from ingress based on the anticipated environment and explains how to describe the enclosure’s degree of protection. The standard also includes suggested ratings for ANSI C136 equipment. The contents and scope of C136.25 may be viewed, or a hardcopy or electronic copy purchased for $48, here.

ANSI C136.35-2009 presents information on the electrical and mechanical interchangeability of electrical devices mounted on or in luminaires, brackets, or remotely mounted on the support structure of the luminaire and that may draw power from the luminaire. The contents and scope of C136.35 may be viewed, or a hardcopy or electronic copy purchased for $36, here.

“These two additions to the ANSI C136 series meet important needs for utilities and area lighting planners looking to protect lighting systems from the environment or effectively use ancillary devices,” said Becky Rainer, chair of the Roadway and Area Lighting Committee that produced the standard.

Both may also be purchased by contacting IHS at 800-854-7179 (within the U.S.), 303-397-7956 (international), 303-397-2740 (fax), or here.

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