Category: Codes + Standards

LightNOW Post on New York City Energy Legislation Generating Great Debate

Some great debate and dialogue going on in my earlier post about New York City’s new legislation requiring existing buildings to upgrade their lighting. What’s your opinion? Check it out…

Some great debate and dialogue going on in my earlier post about New York City’s new legislation requiring existing buildings to upgrade their lighting.

What’s your opinion?

Check it out here.

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NEMA Publishes LSD 46-2009 Photoluminescent Exit Signage—Factual Review

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published LSD 46-2009 Photoluminescent Exit Signage—Factual Review. This new white paper, produced by NEMA’s Emergency Lighting Section, describes concerns regarding the marketing and…

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published LSD 46-2009 Photoluminescent Exit Signage—Factual Review.

This new white paper, produced by NEMA’s Emergency Lighting Section, describes concerns regarding the marketing and application recommendations common to photoluminescent exit signage in the U.S. and Canada. The section seeks to educate potential users as to the drawbacks and realities of installing, retrofitting with, and relying upon this type of emergency equipment.

LSD 46 reviews potentially erroneous claims for the signage, such as those that mention “no electricity consumption,” “no maintenance,” and “exit signs illuminate for hours without charging.” Additional topics include safety, test methods for luminance levels, energy consumption, and enforceability in the field.

Get it as a free download here.

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Liberty Building Forensics Group: Green Building Codes Present Potential Risks

Liberty Building Forensics Group has published a post on its blog here about potential downsides to coming green building codes such as ASHRAE 189.1, Standard for the Design of High…

Green BusinessLiberty Building Forensics Group has published a post on its blog here about potential downsides to coming green building codes such as ASHRAE 189.1, Standard for the Design of High Performance Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings.

Titled, “What Happens When Green Becomes Code: Do Buildings Get Better or Do Lawyers Get Richer?”, warms of the following possible risks:

* Lack of experience will increase design and construction deficiencies
* Standard of care will be elevated, increasing project risks
* Regional issues may not be not addressed

The bottom line, the blog post author argues, is that setting a higher standard does not guarantee it will be implemented correctly, while making it harder to tell the people who implement the standard correctly from those who don’t.

It’s an interesting argument. What do you think?

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More on New York Requiring Buildings to Upgrade Their Lighting

Highlights of Int. No. 973: * Lighting systems in buildings larger than 50,000 gross sq.ft. (or buildings that combined with other buildings on same tax lot in total exceed 100,000…

Highlights of Int. No. 973:

* Lighting systems in buildings larger than 50,000 gross sq.ft. (or buildings that combined with other buildings on same tax lot in total exceed 100,000 sq.ft.) must be upgraded
* Deadline for upgrade is 1/1/2025
* Upgrade defined as meeting minimum requirements of New York City Energy Conservation Code
* Code based on IECC and presents mandatory and prescriptive requirements for lighting controls (interior lighting controls, light reduction controls and automatic lighting shutoff), tandem wiring, exit signs, interior lighting power requirements and exterior lighting
* Notable exceptions such as certain dwelling units

The law says, “This local law shall take effect immediately.”

Get the text of the legislation here (click the Text tab).

Post updated with several corrections on January 16.

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NYC Adopts New Energy Code

Last Friday, we reported on new energy legislation passed in New York City here. Part of the legislation is the creation of a new energy code. NYC’s code is based…

Last Friday, we reported on new energy legislation passed in New York City here. Part of the legislation is the creation of a new energy code.

NYC’s code is based on the state energy code with amendments making it more stringent. The 2007 state code is in turn based on the 2003 IECC, with amendments, while referencing 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 as an alternative standard.

Most significant is the NYC legislation closes the loophole in the state code that allowed buildings to continue operating non-compliant systems if they complete renovations on less than half of a given building system.

Metropolis Magazine has an interesting take on it here.

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The Faces of 90.1

A. J. Glaser, president of HUNT Dimming and the Lighting Controls Association, contributed this article to Consulting-Specifying Engineer, providing an in-depth look at the ASHRAE/IES 90.1 energy standard, where it’s…

A. J. Glaser, president of HUNT Dimming and the Lighting Controls Association, contributed this article to Consulting-Specifying Engineer, providing an in-depth look at the ASHRAE/IES 90.1 energy standard, where it’s come from, and where it’s headed. Check it out here.

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NYC to Require Existing Buildings to Upgrade Their Lighting

New York City has passed significant new legislation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from existing government, commercial and residential buildings in New York City. The six-point Greener, Greater Buildings Plan,…

new york cityNew York City has passed significant new legislation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from existing government, commercial and residential buildings in New York City.

The six-point Greener, Greater Buildings Plan, introduced on Earth Day and enacted as part of PlaNYC, includes four bills that will dramatically reduce the City’s energy usage, saving consumers $700 million annually in energy costs, while creating 17,880 jobs and reducing New York City’s carbon footprint.

In addition to the four pieces of legislation, the six-point plan includes two PlaNYC programs that will train workers for the new construction-related jobs that will be created, and help finance energy-saving improvements using $16 million in federal stimulus funding.

While New York currently has the lowest per capita carbon footprint of any major city in America, about 80% of its carbon footprint comes from energy consumption by its more than 1 million buildings. As 85% of the buildings that exist today will be in use in 2030, increasing efficiency in existing buildings is critical to meeting the PlaNYC goal of a 30% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. Once implemented, the legislation will reduce citywide greenhouse gas emissions by 4.75%, the largest reduction achieved by a single program.

The four bills, which passed in December 2009, include:

Int. No. 973-A: Legislation that requires large commercial buildings (over 50,000 square feet) to upgrade their lighting, and also sub-meter tenant spaces over 10,000 square feet;

Int. No. 564-A: Legislation that creates a New York City Energy Code that existing buildings will have to meet whenever they make renovations (closing the loophole that allows buildings to perpetuate non-compliant systems if they perform renovations on less than half of a given building system);

Int. No. 476-A: Legislation that requires large buildings owners to make an annual benchmark analysis of energy consumption so that owners, tenants, and potential tenants can compare buildings’ energy consumption; and

Int. No. 967-A: Legislation that requires large private buildings to conduct energy audits once every decade and implement energy efficient maintenance practices. Also, all city-owned buildings over 10,000 sq ft will be required to conduct audits and complete energy retrofits that pay for themselves within 7-years.

In addition to the legislation, the Greener, Greater Buildings Plan includes two other initiatives: A workforce development working group of real estate, labor, and others that will identify the skills needed and ensure that sufficient training opportunities exist to fill the estimated 17,880 construction and building-related jobs the legislation will create.

Check out this video describing the new legislation here.

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AIA Report: Green Building Programs Increase 50% Since 2007

In the wake of an extended global economic slump, local communities are pushing ahead and expanding their green building programs. More than one in five U.S. cities with populations greater…

Green BusinessIn the wake of an extended global economic slump, local communities are pushing ahead and expanding their green building programs. More than one in five U.S. cities with populations greater than 50,000 surveyed by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) report having a policy to promote green buildings, accounting for more than 53 million people. The AIA initially conducted this survey in 2007 for a Local Leaders in Sustainability report that has just been updated. The new report, Green Building Policy in a Changing Economic Environment, is an inventory of policies and best practices intended to help policymakers advance a more sustainable legislative agenda for growth and development.

Highlights from the report:

* 138 cities have green building programs, compared with 92 cities in 2007
* 24 of the 25 most populated metropolitan regions in the United States are built around cities with a green building policy
* The Western region has the most green building programs with 56 cities in just six states
* The Mountain region is second in the percentage of cities with green building programs, with 24 percent of residents living in those cities
* The Eastern region has seen a 75 percent rise in green building programs since 2007
* The central region has 21 cities with green building programs

Click here to read this report.

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New Energy Standards for Lighting

Chain Store Age’s Marianne Wilson produced a very well-written story about the new DOE energy standards for general-service fluorescent and incandescent reflector lamps and how these standards will affect retailers….

Chain Store Age’s Marianne Wilson produced a very well-written story about the new DOE energy standards for general-service fluorescent and incandescent reflector lamps and how these standards will affect retailers. I was pleased to represent the Lighting Controls Association in the article and give my two cents.

Check it out here.

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CSI and CSC to End Support of MasterFormat 95 on December 31, 2009

The Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) announced that the organization will cease to license and support MasterFormat 95 as of December 31, 2009. The CSI Board of Directors voted to stop…

The Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) announced that the organization will cease to license and support MasterFormat 95 as of December 31, 2009.

The CSI Board of Directors voted to stop licensing and supporting MasterFormat 95 during its June 16, 2009, meeting at the CSI Annual Convention in Indianapolis. As a result, CSI and Construction Specifications Canada (CSC) will no longer support MasterFormat 95 after December 31, 2009.

In 2004, CSI and CSC introduced the most significant updates to MasterFormat since the standard was introduced in the 1960s. To meet the industry’s changing needs, MasterFormat™ 2004 edition features an expanded structure, increasing the number of divisions from 16 to 50, and replaces the five-digit system from previous editions with a six-digit system. It was expanded to accommodate the many new technologies and building practices introduced since its inception and to provide more complete coverage for all types of construction projects.

MasterFormat™ has long been recognized as a standard in the construction industry to organize project manuals and detailed cost information, and to relate drawing notes to specifications. It aids project delivery by facilitating communication among architects, engineers, specifiers, contractors, suppliers and other consultants, which helps them meet building owners’ requirements, timelines and budgets. By fostering fuller and more detailed construction specifications, MasterFormat is designed to reduce costly changes or delays in projects due to incomplete, misplaced or missing information.

Many high-profile public agencies, companies, A/E firms, consultants and others have made the switch to the latest edition of MasterFormat, but there are still organizations that have not made the transition. Using two different versions of MasterFormat makes it difficult to correctly classify work results and communicate project information. The continued use of MasterFormat 95 and earlier versions also hinders industry standardization and works contrary to interoperability. CSI and CSC are working with the MasterFormat Sponsors to communicate the decision to the industry, promote the benefits of using to the latest version through a communication campaign and to transition their products that use MasterFormat.

For more information on MasterFormat, click here.

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