Month: July 2016

LiFi to be Implemented in Paris Metro

Paris-based Oledcomm has won a contract from Transport Paris (RATP) to install LiFi-capable LED lighting in the Paris Metro, serving more than 2 million daily commuters. Installation has already occurred…

parisParis-based Oledcomm has won a contract from Transport Paris (RATP) to install LiFi-capable LED lighting in the Paris Metro, serving more than 2 million daily commuters. Installation has already occurred at La Defense Station following a test application.

LiFi is visible light communication that uses rapidly modulated LED light emission to transmit complex communications.

LUX has the story here.

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Minecraft Lighting Tutorial

My kids are crazy about Minecraft. If yours are too, this tutorial, courtesy of a budding lighting designer, teaches them various lighting techniques that can be implemented in the game.

My kids are crazy about Minecraft. If yours are too, this tutorial, courtesy of a budding lighting designer, teaches them various lighting techniques that can be implemented in the game.

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Google Tilt Brush Allows 3D Painting with Color and Light

Google has introduced a new way to create and engage with immersive artworks. The solution uses a digital brush and connected HTC Vive headset. The user can then paint strokes…

Google has introduced a new way to create and engage with immersive artworks. The solution uses a digital brush and connected HTC Vive headset. The user can then paint strokes in air to create just about anything.

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Product Monday: Cynch by Amerlux

Amerlux’s LED Cynch is a small, simply styled accent luminaire that operates as a pendant, surface mount, and semi-recessed or recessed on its own or in a recessed multiple. It…

amerluxAmerlux’s LED Cynch is a small, simply styled accent luminaire that operates as a pendant, surface mount, and semi-recessed or recessed on its own or in a recessed multiple. It can also be used as an accent installed within a linear trough or pendant. Engineered with an integral 12V LED driver for 120/277V systems, the luminaire installs with a magnetic connection.

The luminaire is 1.5 inches in diameter and 3-7/16 inches tall. Drawing 6W, Cynch delivers up to 375 lumens and 58 lumens/W, with a CBCP of up to 4,633. Beam spreads range from 13° to 28°, with 0 to 90° vertical tilt and 360° rotation. CCTs are offered in 2700K, 3000K, 3500K and 4000K; a high CRI is delivered up to 92 in 2700K and 3000K color temperatures.

The LED Cynch is crafted with a complete die-cast optical head and no exposed wires. The luminaire also features stamped steel mounting frame with integral mounting bars and a steep upper and driver housing with laser-cut trim.

Finishes includes matte white, matte black and matte silver.

Click here to learn more.

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Using Light to Create Dancing Figures

For the 2016 Spiral Independent Creators Festival, Akinori Goto created a wire wheel that creates dancing figures when illuminated. The project won Runner-up Grand Prix and the Audience Award.

For the 2016 Spiral Independent Creators Festival, Akinori Goto created a wire wheel that creates dancing figures when illuminated. The project won Runner-up Grand Prix and the Audience Award.

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Lighting Energy Consumption Falls 46% from 2003 to 2012

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration has released summary tables providing energy consumption estimates from the 2012 CBECS. The data show that despite a 14% increase in total…

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration has released summary tables providing energy consumption estimates from the 2012 CBECS.

The data show that despite a 14% increase in total buildings and a 22% increase in total floorspace since 2003, energy use in the estimated 5.6 million U.S. commercial buildings was up just 7% during the same period. Slower growth in commercial building energy demand since 2003 is explained in part by newer construction that is built to higher energy performance standards, occupied by less energy-intensive building activities, and more often built in temperate regions. The improved efficiency of key energy-consuming equipment is also decreasing demand. Since 2003, for example, space heating and lighting are each down by 11 percentage points in their share of energy use in buildings.

Electricity consumption, however, has increased significantly, driven by new electricity-using equipment. Electricity increased its share of total energy consumed from 38% in 1979 to 61% in 2012 in commercial buildings. But not for lighting. The total amount of energy used for lighting decreased 46% from 2003 to 2012, driven by energy codes and more-efficient technology.

Click here to read the summary report.

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NEMA Publishes NEMA LSD 74-2016 Considerations of Field LED Driver Replacement

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published NEMA LSD 74-2016 Considerations of Field LED Driver Replacement. This whitepaper discusses issues related to the field replacement of drivers in LED…

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published NEMA LSD 74-2016 Considerations of Field LED Driver Replacement.

This whitepaper discusses issues related to the field replacement of drivers in LED luminaires and how several aspects must be considered to ensure that the replacement driver will function the same as the original driver.

Developed by the NEMA Ballast Section Technical Committee, NEMA LSD 74 is available at no cost here.

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“Going Beyond the Lumen?” by Jim Brodrick

Republication of Postings from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Program by Jim Brodrick, SSL Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy Light sources are typically evaluated in terms…

Republication of Postings from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Program by Jim Brodrick, SSL Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy

Light sources are typically evaluated in terms of how much light they produce (in lumens) relative to how much power they draw (in watts). From lighting designers to building owners to consumers, we’re encouraged to choose the most efficacious light sources appropriate for the task at hand — those with the highest lumens per watt (lm/W). The numerator of that expression is a measure of light output, based on human visual sensitivity under standard viewing conditions. That makes sense: we want to know how much light the source is producing that will help humans to see and function in the world.

But what we’re also starting to understand is that light has other impacts — and potentially great benefits — that are unrelated to human visual sensitivity. In fact, these other benefits, such as improving productivity, have been receiving an increasing amount of attention. But many potential benefits, especially those that depend on the ability to tune the spectrum of SSL products, can’t be accurately conveyed solely in terms of lumens — which means that we may end up needing additional metrics in order to do them justice.

That’s because the lumen is a measure of light output, where emitted light of various wavelengths is weighted in accordance with humans’ visual sensitivity to those wavelengths. But as we’re still learning, the effect of light on humans (and other living creatures) extends well beyond enabling us to see. Researchers have discovered that the human eye contains at least five different types of nonvisual photoreceptor cells — that is, cells that detect light but that play no role whatsoever in visual perception. We’re still learning about the various functions of such cells, but we know that one thing they do is help regulate the production of melatonin, a hormone that plays a key role in regulating the sleep-wake cycle and affects our health in many other ways as well.

We also know that the peak sensitivity for melatonin suppression is for light at around 464 nm, which is in the blue range. And because LEDs — far more than other light sources — are highly tunable, they can be carefully tailored to adjust their emission around 464 nm, or in any other portions of the spectrum the manufacturer desires. They can also be made to be tunable by the user, so that the spectral power distribution can change with the turn of a dial or the touch of a keypad, in accordance with whatever effect is desired.

While much more research is needed to understand how this spectral flexibility can best be used, the potential benefits range from normalizing our circadian rhythm, to promoting relaxation, to improving mood and concentration, to speeding convalescence, to promoting the optimal growth of plants and animals. Further, spectrally adjusted light can help protect sensitive wildlife that live in areas where outdoor lighting is used. And all of this is to say nothing about visual value that’s not captured by the photopic lumen — such as tuning the spectrum to emphasize certain colors or provide contrast for retail, inspection, and high-value fine-manual work applications such as surgery.

Given that we now have a type of light source that can be spectrally tailored to suit our needs, wants, and whims — visual and otherwise — and given that our knowledge of the nonvisual functions is growing by leaps and bounds, it stands to reason that we may need to more carefully consider additional metrics to capture the full range of gifts SSL has to offer, and develop new metrics as science advances.

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Product Monday: Cree Expands LED Troffer Portfolio

Cree’s ZR FD LED Series, a commercial spec-grade troffer that delivers superior energy efficiency of 130 lumens per watt, expands the company’s ZR series of LED troffers. This provides customers…

Cree’s ZR FD LED Series, a commercial spec-grade troffer that delivers superior energy efficiency of 130 lumens per watt, expands the company’s ZR series of LED troffers. This provides customers a choice: ZR Series offering 90+ CRI and 90 lumens/W or the new ZR FD Series offering 80+ CRI and 130 lumens/W.

The full family of ZR FD Series products is available in 2’x4’, 2’x2’ and 1’x4’ sizes and packages of 3300 and 4000 lumens at CCTs of 3500K or 4000K at 80+ CRI. The troffers feature a new matte reflector finish for improved product aesthetics, reduced glare and uniform illumination. An emergency backup option is also available.

Backed by a 10-year warranty, the product has a projected 75,000-hour lifetime at 35°C. Additionally, future SmartCast Technology-enabled options are planned, which will amplify energy savings and provide a more personalized light experience without the added complexity of traditional controls.

Click here to learn more.

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