To reduce peak demand with lighting, we can turn it off, turn it down or use it more efficiently. Since lighting is critical for productivity and safety in many indoor spaces, turning it down instead of off is usually more desirable. Dimmable lighting therefore has a strong potential role to play in demand response.

But how low can we go? Typical levels of automatic dimming, occurring in strategies such as a daylight harvesting, are unlikely to be noticed or found irritable by occupants. Researchers at NRC-IRC put this notion to the test, conducting a study to determine how far, how fast and over what period lighting can be dimmed before occupants notice and are adversely affected.

This is the subject of a new whitepaper I wrote for the Lighting Controls Association, available here.
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