Category: Codes + Standards

New Buildings Institute Releases Model Stretch Building Code

The New Buildings Institute (NBI) recently released a model stretch building code that targets 20% better efficiency than current national building energy codes.

The New Buildings Institute (NBI) recently released a model stretch building code that targets 20% better efficiency than current national building energy codes. The new 20% Stretch Code offers jurisdictions a set of energy-saving building strategies that cover design aspects such as envelope, mechanical, water heating, lighting and plug loads.

The 20% Stretch Code is one of a set of building codes being developed by NBI that provide increasing stringency. The set gives cities and states the basis for maximizing energy savings in both commercial and residential projects over the course of several code development cycles allowing the market to prepare and gain experience with new efficiency practices and technologies.

The stretch code is designed as an “overlay” code to integrate with existing national model energy codes for residential and commercial construction, such as the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1. Cities and states can choose to adopt the entire stretch code or parts of it through their existing code review process. It generally takes legislative action, or state or local code council approval for new building codes to be adopted. State and local governments can also make stretch code adoption voluntary, and incentivize owners and builders to follow the code.

The model code was designed to exceed 90.1-2013 by 20%, but I’m not sure how it fares compared to 90.1-2016, which achieved energy savings, with a significant lighting contribution.

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ICC partnership with ASHRAE, AIA, USGBC and IES Means Higher Performing Buildings will be Easier to Achieve

A unified green building code that could become the foundation for LEED certification was created in 2011, thanks to a partnership among ASHRAE, the International Code Council (ICC), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES), and the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). That effort got a boost in August 2014, when ICC and ASHRAE agreed to align the technical requirements of ASHRAE’s Standard 189.1 for High Performance Green Buildings (189.1) with ICC’s International Green Construction Code (IgCC) into one single model code.

A unified green building code that could become the foundation for LEED certification was created in 2011, thanks to a partnership among ASHRAE, the International Code Council (ICC), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES), and the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).

That effort got a boost in August 2014, when ICC and ASHRAE agreed to align the technical requirements of ASHRAE’s Standard 189.1 for High Performance Green Buildings (189.1) with ICC’s International Green Construction Code (IgCC) into one single model code.

With that agreement, and with the subsequent definition of each organization’s roles, the ASHRAE Standard 189.1 committee continued revising the standard so it could provide technical content for the IgCC, with the ICC responsible for the administrative sections and publication.

This integrated document, coined the “IgCC powered by 189.1,” will become the 2018 version of the IgCC (2018-IgCC), due to be published in summer 2018.

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Revised SSL Standard Extends Chromaticity Range

In a revision of ANSI C78.377-2017 American National Standard for Electric Lamps—Specifications for the Chromaticity of Solid-State Lighting Products, the ANSI Accredited Standards Committee C78, Electric Lamps, establishes a range…

In a revision of ANSI C78.377-2017 American National Standard for Electric Lamps—Specifications for the Chromaticity of Solid-State Lighting Products, the ANSI Accredited Standards Committee C78, Electric Lamps, establishes a range of chromaticity for general lighting with solid-state lighting (SSL) products to ensure that product chromaticity can be communicated to consumers.

Published by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), which also serves as secretariat for the standard, ANSI C78.377 applies to LED lamps, LED light engines, and LED luminaires for general indoor lighting applications.

This revision extends the range of color points for general lighting with energy efficient SSL lighting products. It specifies chromaticity regions below the blackbody (Planckian) locus that are suitable for some lighting applications. Annex E Extended Specifications includes recent studies supporting the premise that light sources with chromaticity in the extended correlated color temperature categories are adequate for many applications.

Click here to purchase the standard.

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ASHRAE/IES 90.1-2016 Decoded

In my June contribution to ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR, I describe what’s new and other major lighting requirements in the 2016 version of the ASHRAE/IES 90.1 energy standard. The new standard focuses…

In my June contribution to ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR, I describe what’s new and other major lighting requirements in the 2016 version of the ASHRAE/IES 90.1 energy standard. The new standard focuses on energy-saving opportunities with LED technology and controls.

Check it out here.

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New Lighting Standard Outlines How to Designate LED Direct Replacement Lamps

ANSI Accredited Standards Committee C78, Electric Lamps, recently published ANSI C78.52-2017 American National Standard for Electric Lamps—LED (Light Emitting Diode) Direct Replacement Lamps—Method of Designation. The National Electrical Manufacturers Association…

ANSI Accredited Standards Committee C78, Electric Lamps, recently published ANSI C78.52-2017 American National Standard for Electric Lamps—LED (Light Emitting Diode) Direct Replacement Lamps—Method of Designation. The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) serves as secretariat for the standard.

ANSI C78.52 is a new lighting standard on how to designate LED lamps that are direct replacements for existing, ANSI-standardized, non-LED lamps. Lamps covered in this standard contain LED-based light sources.

Andrew Jackson, Manager, Corporate Regulatory & Certification Laboratory, Chair of the ANSI C78 Committee: “This new standard also provides an LED Direct Replacement Lamp Code Designation Request Form.” This form allows a manufacturer to request a direct replacement designation using lamp characteristic data.

ANSI C78.52-2017 can be purchased for $350 in hard copy or as an electronic download on the NEMA website. Click here to learn more.

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NEMA Publishes Standard on Test Methods for Temporal Light Artifacts

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) recently published NEMA 77-2017 Temporal Light Artifacts: Test Methods and Guidance for Acceptance Criteria. Temporal Light Artifacts (TLA) are undesired changes in visual perception…

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) recently published NEMA 77-2017 Temporal Light Artifacts: Test Methods and Guidance for Acceptance Criteria.

Temporal Light Artifacts (TLA) are undesired changes in visual perception induced by a light stimulus whose luminance or spectral distribution fluctuates with time, such as flicker and stroboscopic effect.

This new lighting standard makes recommendations on methods of quantifying the visibility of TLA, and initial, broad application-dependent limits on TLA.

“Besides adjusting visible light output, many dimmer designs can react with LED light engines to produce additional light modulation in the form of TLA,” said Jim Gaines, PhD, of Philips Lighting and chair of the NEMA 77 working group. “NEMA 77 provides a method to quantify the likelihood that a given light modulation might produce observable TLA, and employs a measurement framework that allows for further refinement to develop application-specific guidelines.”

NEMA 77-2017 is available for $265 in hard copy and as an electronic download on the NEMA website. Click here to learn more.

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CLTC Publishes Nonresidential Lighting and Electrical Power Distribution Guide for 2016 Title 24

The California Lighting Technology Center’s Nonresidential Lighting and Electrical Power Distribution Guide for the 2016 Building Energy Efficiency Standards is now available. The guide was written to help builders and…

The California Lighting Technology Center’s Nonresidential Lighting and Electrical Power Distribution Guide for the 2016 Building Energy Efficiency Standards is now available.

The guide was written to help builders and lighting industry professionals navigate the nonresidential lighting and electrical power distribution portions of California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24, Part 6). The updated Energy Standards took effect on January 1, 2017. The guide is sponsored by Energy Code Ace and developed in collaboration with the California Energy Commission.

Get it here.

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NEMA Publishes Standard on Test Methods for Temporal Light Artifacts

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) recently published NEMA 77-2017 Temporal Light Artifacts: Test Methods and Guidance for Acceptance Criteria. Temporal Light Artifacts (TLA) are undesired changes in visual perception…

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) recently published NEMA 77-2017 Temporal Light Artifacts: Test Methods and Guidance for Acceptance Criteria.

Temporal Light Artifacts (TLA) are undesired changes in visual perception induced by a light stimulus whose luminance or spectral distribution fluctuates with time, such as flicker and stroboscopic effect. This new lighting standard makes recommendations on methods of quantifying the visibility of TLA, and initial, broad application-dependent limits on TLA.

“Besides adjusting visible light output, many dimmer designs can react with LED light engines to produce additional light modulation in the form of TLA,” said Jim Gaines, PhD, of Philips Lighting and chair of the NEMA 77 working group. “NEMA 77 provides a method to quantify the likelihood that a given light modulation might produce observable TLA, and employs a measurement framework that allows for further refinement to develop application-specific guidelines.”

Click here to learn more.

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Lighting Standards Introduce Lamp Base and Holder for TLED Lamps

The ANSI Accredited Standards Committee C81 recently revised two standards for the lighting industry: ANSI C81.61-2017 American National Standard for Electric Lamp Bases—Specifications for Bases (Caps) for Electric Lamps and…

The ANSI Accredited Standards Committee C81 recently revised two standards for the lighting industry: ANSI C81.61-2017 American National Standard for Electric Lamp Bases—Specifications for Bases (Caps) for Electric Lamps and ANSI C81.62-2017 American National Standard for Electric Lampholders. These standards present specifications for lamp bases and holders, and now include G6.6 designations.

“The tubular LED (T-LED) industry has a new connector system designed to mechanically hold and power T-LED lamps across a wide range of voltages,” said Mike May, CEO of Deltavation and ASC C81 committee member. “These revisions include the T-LED Snap-Fit design (G6.6 designation)—a base with two internal power pins and an additional ground pin that mates to an accompanying lamp holder.”

May explained that the Snap-Fit system provides differentiation between fluorescent and LED lighting. “This is a departure from the legacy external bi-pin system used for fluorescent tube lamps,” he said. “These standards now provide the marketplace with a base and lamp holder specifically designed for the T-LED industry.”

Click here to learn more about ANSI C81.61-2017 (lamp bases) and here to learn more about ANSI C81.62-2017 (lampholders).

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Proposing a Redefined Lumen Instead of CRI as a Basis for Regulation

In this article published in LEDs Magazine, Mark Rea, Director of the Lighting Research Center, and Jean Paul Freyssinier, Senior Research Scientist for the LRC, propose a new definition for…

reaIn this article published in LEDs Magazine, Mark Rea, Director of the Lighting Research Center, and Jean Paul Freyssinier, Senior Research Scientist for the LRC, propose a new definition for the lumen. This lumen should be used in product regulations instead of CRI, as CRI arguably does not align to consumer preferences for color rendering.

Rea and Freyssinier make their case here.

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