Linear or tubular LED lamps (TLEDs) typically draw about 60% of the power of linear fluorescents and have become a viable retrofit option. DOE’s CALiPER program has released a new Snapshot report on TLEDs that’s based on LED Lighting Facts data.

Among the key findings:

• TLEDs now comprise more than 50% of all lamps listed with LED Lighting Facts, and more than 10% of all listed products.
• TLEDs offer the highest mean efficacy of any lamp type, and also include the listed product with the highest efficacy (190 lm/W).
• In aggregate, TLED efficacy decreases by 3 lm/W for every 1000K decrease in CCT.
• While the raw efficacy of TLEDs exceeds that of dedicated LED troffers, the reverse is true if TLED efficacy is adjusted to account for luminaire efficiency. In other words, dedicated LED troffers tend to exceed the efficacy of troffers fitted with TLEDs.
• Almost all (98%) of the listed TLEDs have a CRI in the 80s, with most between 80 and 85.
• A vast majority (97%) of TLEDs that are currently listed by LED Lighting Facts (and that report this optional metric) have a power factor of 0.90 or greater.
• Nearly 90% of the currently listed TLEDs (which include 2′- and 4′-long products) emit between 1,000 and 3,000 lumens. This is generally less than the emission of a typical 4′ linear fluorescent lamp. Of the more than two-thirds of TLED products that are identified as having a 4′ length, the mean output is 2,094 lumens.

Viable TLED options are increasingly available, which was not the case a few years ago. As they push the efficacy limits for LED products, TLEDs can be compelling replacements for fluorescent tubes, as long as other tradeoffs are appropriately accounted for. When evaluating TLEDs, it’s critical to examine the expected performance of the complete lamp and luminaire system, understand the complexities of installation, and be cautious in considering long-term performance.

Click here to get the report.

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