Category: Education + Resources

Lighting and the Visual Environment for Seniors and the Low Vision Population (ANSI/IES RP-28-16)

Seniors represent the fastest-growing segment of the population with over 40 million Americans over 65 (U.S. Census Bureau, The Older Population. 2010), with over 10,000 Baby Boomers turning 65 every…

Seniors represent the fastest-growing segment of the population with over 40 million Americans over 65 (U.S. Census Bureau, The Older Population. 2010), with over 10,000 Baby Boomers turning 65 every day. The over-40 population represents approximately 89 million people and of those, 63% have vision problems (National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health 2010).

Published by the Illuminating Engineering Society, Lighting and the Visual Environment for Seniors and the Low-Vision Population (RP-28-16) is intended to increase designers’ understanding of age-related vision loss and the importance of their design decisions that could impact the safety and independence of this growing sector of the population.

In the 2007 edition, applications were primarily directed at housing and senior care facilities, but in the 2016 edition, coverage has been expanded to new areas of interest including offices, hospitality, healthcare, commercial and places of assembly. RP-28-16 has also been revised to serve a wider range of users, including individuals, design professionals, owners/managers of commercial buildings, code and regulatory agencies and legislative bodies.

It is well understood that healthcare costs will increase as our elderly population ages. As the United States braces for this huge economic impact, appropriate lighting and a supportive visual environment should be considered as a preventive measure to reduce the risk of falls, sleep disorders and long-term care, and therefore given a top priority by all code officials, governmental agencies and the tax-paying public.

Click here to order RP-28-16.

No Comments on Lighting and the Visual Environment for Seniors and the Low Vision Population (ANSI/IES RP-28-16)

Eaton Announces 2017 SOURCE Education Schedule

Eaton recently announced its 2017 calendar of classes available at its SOURCE Lighting Education Center. The facility, which has educated more than 163,000 professionals and students, offers a wide variety…

Eaton recently announced its 2017 calendar of classes available at its SOURCE Lighting Education Center. The facility, which has educated more than 163,000 professionals and students, offers a wide variety of continuing education-accredited classes designed to broaden the understanding of lighting, controls and its applications. This year, the SOURCE curriculum includes new lighting controls classes ranging from fundamentals to advanced energy-saving controls strategies and classes on commissioning.

Current available seminars/workshops for 2017 are:

March 29 – 31: Lighting Fundamentals/Lighting Basics

May 3 – 5: Lighting Fundamentals/Lighting Basics

May 23 – 26: Controls Specialist

June 14 – 16: LEDs, Controls and Energy Solutions

June 28 – 30: Lighting Fundamentals/Lighting Basics

July 13 – 14: Healthcare Lighting Solutions Workshop

July 19 – 21: Lighting Fundamentals/Lighting Basics

August 16 – 18: Lighting Fundamentals/Lighting Basics

August 22 – 25: Controls Specialist

September 20 – 21: Controls Fundamentals

September 20 – 23: Lighting Fundamentals/Lighting Basics

October 4 – 6: LEDs, Controls and Energy Solutions

October 12 – 13: LED & New Technology for Residential Lighting

November 7 – 10: Controls Specialist

November 9 – 10: LED Exterior Lighting Solutions

December 13 – 15: Lighting Fundamentals/Lighting Basics

Click here to see course descriptions and additional information and to register.

No Comments on Eaton Announces 2017 SOURCE Education Schedule

Lighting Controls Association Expands Energy Codes Online Course

The Lighting Controls Association (LCA) has published a new course to enhance its Education Express program: EE203: Lighting and Commercial Energy Codes, Part 2: ASHRAE/IES 90.1-2013 and IECC 2015. Complying…

The Lighting Controls Association (LCA) has published a new course to enhance its Education Express program: EE203: Lighting and Commercial Energy Codes, Part 2: ASHRAE/IES 90.1-2013 and IECC 2015.

Complying with a Department of Energy mandate, a growing number of states are adopting commercial building energy codes at least as stringent as ASHRAE/IES 90.1-2013 and the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Authored by Craig DiLouie, LC, CLCP, IES, EE203 Part 2 provides a lighting controls compliance roadmap. The course identifies all sections of the energy standards, describes the requirements, and provides decision trees to simplify understanding and compliance.

EE203 Part 2 is registered with the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Continuing Education System (CES), which recognizes 3.0 Learning Units (LU)/Health, Safety, Welfare (HSW) credits; and the National Council on Quality in the Lighting Professions (NCQLP), which recognizes 3.0 LEUs towards maintenance of the Lighting Certified (LC) certification.

EE203 is published as Part 2 of the Lighting and Commercial Energy Codes course. Part 1 covers the previous standards, ASHRAE/IES 90.1-2010 and IECC 2012.

To register and take this course, visit the LCA web site at www.LightingControlsAssociation.org and click the Education Express button.

1 Comment on Lighting Controls Association Expands Energy Codes Online Course

CLUE Announces Third Competition

The third Community Lighting for the Urban Environment (CLUE) competition, sponsored by Philips Lighting University, is now welcoming submissions. This year’s CLUE competition carries the general theme, “One for Light,…

The third Community Lighting for the Urban Environment (CLUE) competition, sponsored by Philips Lighting University, is now welcoming submissions.

This year’s CLUE competition carries the general theme, “One for Light, Light for All.” Industry-college and university students as well as young professionals are invited to propose innovative lighting solutions around the specific theme of extending personalization of private spaces into the personalization of public spaces.

The deadline for submissions is January 31, 2017.

A jury will pick winning submissions, who will receive one of three grants totaling $8,500 in addition to a trip to LIGHTFAIR 2017.

Click here to learn more.

No Comments on CLUE Announces Third Competition

Lighting Research Center Expands M.S. in Lighting Program, Offering Paid Externships

The Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has recently expanded its M.S. in Lighting degree program to include a paid career externship at a leading lighting manufacturer, design…

lrcThe Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has recently expanded its M.S. in Lighting degree program to include a paid career externship at a leading lighting manufacturer, design firm, or government organization. Upon graduation, students now have the opportunity to participate in a paid externship for three months or more with one of many lighting organizations that have agreed to host LRC students, including Current by GE, OSRAM, Philips Lighting, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Bridgelux, Hubbell Lighting, Ketra, USAI Lighting, and numerous others.

In 1990, the LRC became the first university research center to offer graduate degrees in lighting and today, offers a M.S. in lighting and a Ph.D. to educate future leaders in lighting. The LRC is part of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, America’s first technological research university, founded in 1824. With more than 35 faculty and staff working closely with 15 select graduate students, and a 30,000 sq. ft. laboratory space, the LRC is the largest university-based lighting research and education organization in the world.

The M.S. in Lighting program at Rensselaer is a master’s level graduate degree offered in the field of lighting, focusing on lighting technology, design, human factors, and applications. This 9-month degree program allows students to engage with world-class faculty experts in architecture, engineering, design, and biosciences. Students enrolled in the LRC’s M.S. in Lighting program explore emerging trends in customization and data analytics, in areas such as the Internet of Things (IoT) and networked/connected lighting, 3D printing of lighting components, lighting for circadian health and wellbeing, lighting for plant health, aviation and automotive lighting, and other topics in lighting technology, application and design. The LRC attracts students with undergraduate degrees in engineering, physics, biology, psychology, architecture, and design.

The program culminates in a master’s project in the second semester during which each student focuses on a particular area of interest under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Some examples of recent student projects include: remote monitoring of LED lighting system performance, designing a portfolio of lighting patterns to support circadian health and wellbeing, studying the impact of lighting on performance, and evaluating OLED and edge-lit LED lighting panels.

The application deadline for Fall 2017 is January 2, 2017.

Click here to learn more.

No Comments on Lighting Research Center Expands M.S. in Lighting Program, Offering Paid Externships

Dawn De Grazio Appointed Technical Editor at IES

The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) recently appointed Dawn De Grazio as Technical Editor, effective October 3. This newly created staff position will assist technical committees and IES…

dawn-degrazioThe Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) recently appointed Dawn De Grazio as Technical Editor, effective October 3.

This newly created staff position will assist technical committees and IES Staff with editing IES standards, documents, and articles for accuracy and consistency. The position requires a high level of lighting technical knowledge and the ability to accurately describe, in both verbal and written communications, the intent of IES Standards to a broad audience. De Grazio reports to the Technical Director of Standards, Brian Liebel.

Prior to being appointed Technical Editor, De Grazio was elected by members of the IES as an At-Large Director on the IES Board of Directors. She previously was employed as the Director of Customer Education for Lighting Analysts in Littleton, Colorado. She has served as a member of the several IES technical committees, including Roadway Lighting Committee, Outdoor Environmental Lighting Committee, and Marks Award Committee, and was Secretary of the Visual Effects of Lamp Spectral Distribution Committee. She also contributed to several IES publications and received the IES Distinguished Service Award in 2012. De Grazio graduated from the Architectural Engineering program at the University of Colorado Boulder.

I’ve known Dawn for a number of years, and consider her one of the most knowledgeable and dedicated professionals in our industry. This is a great move for IES and for Dawn as well. Congratulations, Dawn!

1 Comment on Dawn De Grazio Appointed Technical Editor at IES

Peter Ngai on OLED Lighting

Earlier this year, the OLED Coalition and the California Lighting Technology Center hosted the OLED Lighting Workshop. Peter Ngai of Acuity Brands kicked off the event with a keynote. Click…

Earlier this year, the OLED Coalition and the California Lighting Technology Center hosted the OLED Lighting Workshop. Peter Ngai of Acuity Brands kicked off the event with a keynote.

Click here to download the presentation.

oled

No Comments on Peter Ngai on OLED Lighting

DOE Hosts Webinars on Healthcare Lighting

DOE is offering a series of webinars on healthcare lighting. Both start at 1:00 PM EST and last for 60 minutes: Tuesday, October 4: Evidence-Based Design for Healthcare Lighting: Where’s…

DOE is offering a series of webinars on healthcare lighting. Both start at 1:00 PM EST and last for 60 minutes:

Tuesday, October 4: Evidence-Based Design for Healthcare Lighting: Where’s the Evidence?
Presenters: Anjali Joseph, Clemson University, Robert Davis and Andrea Wilkerson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

The nonvisual effects of light have captured a lot of interest lately, as important new research on the topic emerges. But beyond the nonvisual effects of light, architectural lighting supports other important outcomes for caregivers and patients, addressing visual task needs and providing for overall comfort and wellbeing. This webinar will present results from a major literature review summarizing published evidence for the benefits of high-quality healthcare lighting reported in recent research. It will also discuss how future research can provide even stronger evidence to link the design of healthcare facilities to a holistic set of human needs. The presenters will describe the major findings from recent research related to lighting for healthcare applications, explain how research methodology can be improved for future application to healthcare design, evaluate how the principles derived from recent research can be applied to an evidence-based design process that addresses a holistic set of visual and nonvisual human needs, and compare the benefits and drawbacks of emerging SSL technologies for addressing the needs of patients and caregivers in healthcare applications.

Click here to learn more or register.

Tuesday, October 18: Tuning the Light in Senior Care
Presenters: Connie Samla, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Robert Davis and Andrea Wilkerson, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

DOE collaborated with the Sacramento (CA) Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and the ACC Care Center in Sacramento to evaluate a trial installation of LED lighting systems, in preparation for a planned expansion and renovation at ACC. New LED lighting systems, including white-tunable luminaires and amber night lighting, were installed in two patient rooms, a central nurse station, corridor, family room, and administrative office. The systems were compared to the existing fluorescent systems in terms of their photometric performance and estimated energy use, and the ACC staff tracked behavioral and health measures before and after the installation. This webinar will share the results of the initial pilot study and how this has affected ACC’s future plans. The presenters will evaluate the results of the trial lighting systems (including energy, photometry, patient behavioral measures, and feedback from patients and caregivers), analyze several techniques for implementing amber LED lighting for nighttime navigation, describe the control scripts used for tuning the LED lighting spectrum and output based on the desired sleep cycle effects at different times of the day, and explain the challenges faced when installing these solutions in existing buildings.

Click here to learn more or register.

No Comments on DOE Hosts Webinars on Healthcare Lighting

DOE Provides Three Tools to Aid Use of IES TM30 Color Evaluation Method

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) offers three new resources to help lighting professionals understand IES TM-30-15, which describes a new method for evaluating light-source color rendition. Created by an…

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) offers three new resources to help lighting professionals understand IES TM-30-15, which describes a new method for evaluating light-source color rendition.

Created by an Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) task group to address the widely acknowledged limitations of CRI, which is simpler to use but less accurate, TM-30 encompasses several individual measures and graphics that complement one another and, together, provide a comprehensive characterization of how the light will affect the color appearance of objects.

TM-30 uses 99 color samples that come in all hues, both saturated and unsaturated, and were chosen to cover the range found in common consumer goods and natural objects. The three highest-level components of TM-30 are the Fidelity Index (Rf), the Gamut Index (Rg), and the Color Vector Graphic. Numerous sub-indices can provide more-detailed information about such things as the color fidelity of reds, the chroma shift of reds, and the fidelity of skin tones.

The new DOE resources on TM-30 include:

• A fact sheet, “Evaluating Color Rendition Using IES TM-30-15”
• A video featuring Michael Royer of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who chaired the IES TM-30 task group
• An extensive list of FAQs on TM-30, featuring the answers to 65 questions related to its development, measures, application and data

Click here to access these resources.

2 Comments on DOE Provides Three Tools to Aid Use of IES TM30 Color Evaluation Method

IESNYC Announces 2016 Thesis Prizes

The Illuminating Engineering Society New York City Section (IESNYC) awarded its annual Thesis Prizes to Aditi Govil, MFA Lighting Design, Parsons School of Design and to Ukwatte L. Indika U….

The Illuminating Engineering Society New York City Section (IESNYC) awarded its annual Thesis Prizes to Aditi Govil, MFA Lighting Design, Parsons School of Design and to Ukwatte L. Indika U. Perera, Ph.D., a research scientist at The Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI).

The Thesis Prize recognizes degree candidates of graduate-level lighting programs in New York State. The winners presented their projects on May 19, 2016 and received a cash award of $1,000.

thesis

Aditi Govil’s thesis is titled, “A Walk in a Woman’s Shoes: Re-thinking Lighting in Urban Nightscapes.” She argues that the female urban experience is very different than the male experience. While danger can’t be eliminated by changing just one factor, perception of fear can be influenced by lighting.

Click here to download it.

thesis2

Ukwatte L. Indika U. Perera, PhD’s thesis is titled, “Thermal Analysis of LED Phosphor Layer.” LED white light is commonly produced by combining LED emission with the re-mission from an excited phosphor layer. In this dissertation, a theoretical model demonstrating both light and heat transfer in the phosphor helps identify factors influencing heat generation. An experiment was conducted to validate the utility of a dedicated phosphor layer heat sink design to improve product life.

Click here to download it.

No Comments on IESNYC Announces 2016 Thesis Prizes

Type on the field below and hit Enter/Return to search