Study Documents Major Job Growth from 179D Tax Deduction

As many as 77,000 new design and construction jobs would be created annually over 10 years–along with almost $7.4 billion more in annual GDP–if Congress and the Administration continue an important energy efficiency tax policy, according to an economic impact study by Regional Economic Models Inc. (REMI).

Section 179D of the tax code, also known as the Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Deduction, allows qualifying building owners and businesses to receive up to a $1.80 per square foot tax deduction for certain energy efficient improvements placed into service during all open tax years. It was originally passed by Congress as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 in direct response to broader energy usage and independence concerns.

The REMI study documents job creation and GDP growth under three scenarios that continue energy efficiency tax policies:

· Modernizing Section 179D, including increasing the deduction to $3 per square foot and making certain other reforms to strengthen it, generates significant job creation – on average 76,529 per year during its first decade.

· A long-term extension of the deduction at its current $1.80 per square foot level creates an average of almost 41,000 jobs per year over 10 years.

· A long-term extension at $1.80 per square foot, extension of the deduction to hospitals, schools, and other non-profits and to tribal community facilities, and an increase in the energy efficiency requirements creates almost 40,000 jobs per year over the next decade.

The economic growth and job creation generated by a modernized Section 179D would result in a striking GDP return of ten to one when considering the cost of the tax policy, the study finds.

The study was co-funded by the American Institute of Architects (AIA), along with Alliant Group LP, Ameresco, Blue Energy Group, Concord Energy Strategies, Energy Tax Savers, Energy Systems Group, National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and the United States Green Building Council (USGBC).

Click here to see the full study.

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