Month: January 2015

Jim Brodrick on Evaluating LED Luminaire Reliability

Republication of Postings from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Program by Jim Brodrick, SSL Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy Long lifetime ranks high on solid-state lighting’s…

Republication of Postings from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Program

by Jim Brodrick, SSL Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy

Long lifetime ranks high on solid-state lighting’s list of potential advantages. But accurately predicting that lifetime is no easy matter, because — unlike most other lighting technologies — SSL has many different components, each one of which can cause system failure. You may recall that in 2011, an industry working group under the auspices of DOE and the Next Generation Lighting Industry Alliance (NGLIA) published the seminal report LED Luminaire Lifetime: Recommendations for Testing and Reporting. A revised version of that report — the latest in a series on LED product performance and reliability — has just been published by the NGLIA’s LED System Reliability Consortium (LSRC), which is a spinoff of the earlier working group. Based on the considerable progress made since 2011 in the understanding of SSL failure mechanisms, the new report summarizes what’s been learned to date, suggests directions for further work, and updates the previous recommendations for describing the life and reliability of LED luminaires.

The LSRC draws on the electronics and testing expertise of RTI International, whose ongoing work on accelerated lifetime testing is focused on developing a model for predicting the lifetime of integrated SSL luminaires and led to the publication of the 2013 report Hammer Testing Findings for Solid-State Lighting Luminaires. The findings of that report not only reinforce the belief that the other luminaire components are far more likely to fail than the LEDs, but suggest that certain stress factors such as heat and humidity could accelerate those failures. Accelerated testing, once established, could greatly reduce the time and expense presently needed to evaluate product lifetime. It’s not that the luminaires would be likely to encounter high heat and humidity during real-life usage, but rather that such conditions speed up the failure rates of the various components, and that a way may be found to accurately project actual lifetime based on those speeded-up failure rates.

Because the importance of some lighting parameters is dependent on the particular application, the LSRC recommends that LED lighting products be classified into three reliability categories — lamp-replacement grade, standard grade, and specification grade — that cut across all market segments and apply to a range of parameters, from color stability to light output. The idea here is to keep costs down by enabling manufacturers to tailor stringency to actual needs, rather than force them to take an over-engineered and over-tested one-size-fits-all approach.

Color shift has been added to the LSRC’s new recommendations as a consideration in defining lifetime — but only for those applications where color stability is important. The color of general-illumination lighting products doesn’t shift steadily, but runs in all directions — which means that the best one can do is describe the magnitude of the shift over a given interval. There may be several different mechanisms that come into play — involving changes in the phosphors, changes in the LEDs themselves, and mechanical changes. But right now it’s not clear what those changes are, so there’s a need to unravel the underlying mechanisms to get a better handle on them. For those applications where color stability is an important consideration, it may be advisable for the customer and manufacturer to negotiate with one another; some manufacturers even claim to have proprietary means of predicting the color stability of their own products.

The new recommendations are an important step toward consistent, industrywide understanding of this complex topic. Gaining a better understanding of SSL reliability will help increase consumer confidence — which, in turn, will accelerate adoption of this energy-saving technology.

The new recommendations can be found online.

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GE Announces Lighting Institute Course Offering for 2015

GE recently announced for 2015 the public offered courses at the GE Lighting Institute at Nela Park in Cleveland, Ohio: 2/3-5 Fundamentals of Lighting – 1.5 CEU 2/17-19 Lighting Retrofits…

GE recently announced for 2015 the public offered courses at the GE Lighting Institute at Nela Park in Cleveland, Ohio:

2/3-5 Fundamentals of Lighting – 1.5 CEU
2/17-19 Lighting Retrofits – 1.0 CEU

3/10-12 Lighting Essentials for Distributors – 1.0 CEU
3/17-18 Lighting for Commercial Properties – 1.0 CEU
3/25-27 Advanced Selling Tools for LED Solutions – 1.5 CEU

4/7-8 LED Outdoor Lighting – 1.0 CEU
4/28-30 Fundamentals of Lighting – 1.5 CEU

5/12-14 Lighting Retrofits – 1.0 CEU
5/27-28 Intermediate Lighting – 1.0 CEU

6/2-4 Advanced Selling Tools for LED Solutions – 1.5 CEU
6/16-17 Lighting for Colleges and Universities – 1.0 CEU
6/25-26 Lighting for Healthcare Facilities – 1.0 CEU

7/14-15 Retail Lighting Forum – 1.0 CEU
7/21-23 Lighting Retrofits – 1.0 CEU
7/28-30 Fundamentals of Lighting – 1.5 CEU

8/11-12 Hospitality Lighting – 1.0 CEU
8/18-19 Lighting for Manufacturing Facilities – 1.0 CEU
8/25-27 Advanced Selling Tools for LED Solutions – 1.5 CEU

9/15-17 Lighting Essentials for Distributors – 1.0 CEU
9/22-24 LC Exam Prep Course – 1.5 CEU
9/29-10/1 Lighting Retrofits – 1.0 CEU

10/14-15 Intermediate Lighting – 1.0 CEU
10/27-28 LED Outdoor Lighting – 1.0 CEU

11/17-19 Advanced Selling Tools for LED Solutions – 1.5 CEU

12/8-10 Fundamentals of Lighting – 1.5 CEU

Click here to learn more and enroll.

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NEMA Publishes Standard for Harmonic Emission Limits and Related Power Quality Requirements

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published ANSI C82.77-10-2014 American National Standard for Lighting Equipment—Harmonic Emission Limits—Related Power Quality Requirements. This standard specifies harmonic limits, their methods of measurement,…

The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published ANSI C82.77-10-2014 American National Standard for Lighting Equipment—Harmonic Emission Limits—Related Power Quality Requirements.

This standard specifies harmonic limits, their methods of measurement, and power factor for lighting equipment. With the increased use of sensitive electronic equipment, harmonic distortion on power lines is an ever-increasing issue for residential, commercial and industrial users.

Developing a standard that specifies the limits of total harmonic distortion helps ensure that a manufacturer’s equipment meets industry guidelines and protects the overall quality of the power system.

ANSI C82.77-10-2014 may be purchased for $69 in electronic or hardcopy format here.

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Kevin Willmorth Revisits 52 in 52

In 2010, Kevin Willmorth embarked on an extraordinary task–create 52 LED lighting products in 52 weeks. In honor of 2015 being the International Year of Light, he’s doing it again….

willmorthIn 2010, Kevin Willmorth embarked on an extraordinary task–create 52 LED lighting products in 52 weeks. In honor of 2015 being the International Year of Light, he’s doing it again. Check out his interesting creations here.

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Product Monday: LED Pendants and Sconces by Winona

The Canoe LED Pendant and Sconce Collection from Winona Lighting features an elegant slim profile and even indirect illumination. The Canoe family is offered in three styles: vertical wall mount,…

The Canoe LED Pendant and Sconce Collection from Winona Lighting features an elegant slim profile and even indirect illumination.

The Canoe family is offered in three styles: vertical wall mount, horizontal wall mount and horizontal pendant. Luminaires range from 30 to 54 inches in length depending on mount application.

The solid aluminum housing is available in five standard finishes. Available color temperatures include 3000K, 3500K and 4000K with 2,100 or 4,100 lumen output options.

Click here to learn more.

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DOE Releases Report on SSL Adoption in Museums

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has released a new GATEWAY report that summarizes the results of a survey regarding conversions to solid-state lighting in museums. The survey was sent…

dunedin-thumbThe U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has released a new GATEWAY report that summarizes the results of a survey regarding conversions to solid-state lighting in museums. The survey was sent to members of the museum community who had requested a copy of “The Guidelines for Assessing Solid-State Lighting for Museums,” the pivotal resource co-authored by Jim Druzik and Stefan Michalski in 2011.

Among the results:

• From “almost none” in 2009, LED is now the principal lighting type in 40% of museum workplaces, versus 51% for incandescent, 13% for compact fluorescent, 11% for linear fluorescent, and 22% for “other,” which includes metal halide, halogen, and daylight.
• Of those using LED, 71% indicated that they would consider and implement another LED installation, 32% already had, and only 6% would not.
• Main considerations in lamp selection included color, spectral power distribution (SPD) and damage potential, with lamp efficacy, initial cost and form factor following.
• While 75% of respondents experienced early LED product failures, the maximum failure rate reported was only 2.5% of the installed lamps or fixtures.
• Perceived barriers to adoption included potential high cost; a selection process made confusing by the variety of products and rapid technology advances; resistance to change; and technology limitations, such as poor dimming performance.
• In color evaluation, almost all respondents considered color rendering index, with target values greater than 85; two-thirds considered correlated color temperature (CCT), with target values between 2700 and 3000K; and 60% evaluated the light source SPD.

Although the energy savings from LED conversion are well known, lower damage potential to artwork and sensitive artifacts and increased possibility for controls are other incentives for museum adoption. In general, white LEDs pose no special issues in color rendering or increased damage potential for works of art, compared to an equivalent CCT halogen or fluorescent source. Lighting controls can increase energy savings and would enable the museum lighting designer to specify lighting exposure (illuminance, spectrum, time) to minimize damage while providing optimal viewing conditions.

Click here to get the report.

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LRC Examines Mogul Base LED Replacement Lamps, Authors New Report

HID lamps represent 2% of all installed lamps but 26% of national lighting energy consumption. Mogul-base LED replacement lamps are now being marketed as energy-saving equivalents. In response to a…

HID lamps represent 2% of all installed lamps but 26% of national lighting energy consumption. Mogul-base LED replacement lamps are now being marketed as energy-saving equivalents.

In response to a need to objectively evaluate available options, the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute began characterizing the market for and performance testing of mogul-base LED lamps designed as a retrofit option for multiple types of lighting applications, from high bay and post top to wall pack, yard light and cobra head.

LRC recently completed Phase 1 of the project, authoring a new report that provides details of the market characterization and pilot photometric testing of 18 representative mogul-base LED lamps alone and in luminaires. LRC also conducted a comprehensive survey of specifiers to identify key considerations for lamp selection and relevant luminaire performance characteristics for various lighting applications (e.g., light output, intensity distribution, size), to support the development of a performance testing plan, the results of which are also included in the report. Phase 2 is now underway, consisting of additional performance testing of mogul base LED lamps in representative luminaire types. The results of Phase 2 testing will be released as they become available.

LRC found that only 4 of the 18 lamps met the minimum DesignLights Consortium Qualified Products List criteria for retrofit kits when the lamps were placed in area lighting and roadway luminaires. The lamps tested in wall pack and high bay luminaires did not meet the applicable minimum efficacy criteria for retrofit kits.

Click here to download this free report.

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2015 Lighting for Tomorrow Competition Call for Submissions

Lighting for Tomorrow, the energy-efficient residential lighting product awards competition, is now accepting submissions. This includes energy-efficient lamps and luminaires as well as controls. The deadline for Intent to Submit…

lightingfortomorrowLighting for Tomorrow, the energy-efficient residential lighting product awards competition, is now accepting submissions. This includes energy-efficient lamps and luminaires as well as controls.

The deadline for Intent to Submit is April 24, 2015. For complete guidelines and rules, click here.

Winners will be announced during an award ceremony at the ALA Conference in October 2015, in Huntington Beach, California. Award recipients will be eligible to be promoted by energy efficiency programs across the US and Canada during the following year.

Launched in 2002, Lighting for Tomorrow is organized by the American Lighting Association (ALA), the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) and Underwriters Laboratories (UL). Approximately two dozen energy efficiency organizations in the US and Canada participate in supporting this competition.

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DOE Announces New Fluorescent Lamp Energy Standards

On the last day of 2014, the Department of Energy (DOE) completed new standards for general-service fluorescent lamps. You can see the complete regulations here. After a first read-through, the…

On the last day of 2014, the Department of Energy (DOE) completed new standards for general-service fluorescent lamps.

You can see the complete regulations here.

After a first read-through, the regulations appear to strengthen existing lamp standards with a majority of covered lamp types.

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I’m currently working on a detailed write-up of the new standards, which I’ll share soon.

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Product Monday: APlus by Edison Price

The APlus product line, which includes the APlus WhiteLight and the dim-to-warm APlus Sunset, provide LED combination downlight/wallwashers. The APlus product line is powered by Cree’s diffuse dome LED module…

The APlus product line, which includes the APlus WhiteLight and the dim-to-warm APlus Sunset, provide LED combination downlight/wallwashers.

The APlus product line is powered by Cree’s diffuse dome LED module (90+ CRI). Downlight reflectors provide a wide distribution with a 0.9 spacing ratio, a 40° shielding angle and low brightness at normal viewing angles.

The APlus includes three sets of combination downlight/wallwash reflectors, offering 1) standard wallwashing, 2) corner wallwashing for inside corners, and 3) double wallwashing for corridors.

The APlus WhiteLight is available in a 5” or 6” aperture, and 3000K, 3500K and 4000K. Lumen options range from 850 to 4000 lumens, and luminaire efficacies range from 55 to 74.

The APlus Sunset dim smoothly from 2700K to 1800K, providing an incandescent-style experience desired in residences and hospitality spaces. Available in 5” and 6” apertures, and 850, 1250, and 2000 lumens.

Click here to learn more.

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